74

First the orange is dirty. You solve that, and only then the orange has pesticides. You solve that, and only then does the orange cause allergies. You can bet that if you proved that oranges are hypoallergenic, there would have been another objection. Your wife does not have a problem with the orange. Something else is going on.


38

This is an almost universal dispute between mothers and children. Children are terrible judges of appropriate clothing; they frequently resist bringing adequate layers. My policy is to let them make that bad choice a few times, and they will naturally self-correct after being cold and miserable. Update Don't overthink it everyone. Yes, child can get ...


23

I agree with the answers given, for the most part. At 8, the child is probably not under-dressing to make a fashion statement. The worst thing that might happen is someone is left lugging around an extra layer (isn't that partly what parents are for? ;)) and everyone learns. Eventually stop lugging around the layers. It's important to respect a child's ...


22

You should buy an organic orange - many citrus fruit are treated with fungicudes etc. to prevent mold in stores and during transport (we consumers benefit only by accident). There is a question over at Seasoned Advice that discusses whether they may be washed off. That said, if you give your child a washed organic orange - under supervision, of course - I ...


14

Based on the additional information provided in the comments and to paraphrase the question: You are concerned that an unknown male parent in a public park and with their own child of a similar age might abduct/harm your child from right under your nose while you are watching them play a game that has no inappropriate content whatsoever. All this while ...


14

If you ask me, except if taken out of the dustbin, or if it rolled on a dirty floor, or if you are travelling in a country with different bacteria, oranges are ok to play with and even touch with mouth. If there is a little doubt or objection from the mother, rinsing it should be enough. Also, there is an elephant in the room here, or two. Firstly, you ...


12

I used to get into this argument with my 8 year old, especially when dressing for school. My argument was, "Just take the coat. If you don't need it, you don't have to wear it." Under cross-examination, it emerged that the school had a policy of requiring the children to wear any outdoor clothing they brought with them. This caused the children to underdress ...


11

Generally speaking anywhere that you can go, your 10-month-old can go too. So really it's about weighing up risk and reward, a task which absolutely lacks black and white distinctions. Obviously if you're letting them explore at all then you need to be aware of your surroundings and your child's capabilities; for example if there are any trip hazards or ...


6

The rule at my house was "You don't have to wear them, but you have to bring them with you." This started in grade one or two. My boys abided by this, and often changed their minds about wearing them en route. This was a low consequence decision that set the standard for snow pants, touques, winter boots, etc.


5

I would try to find physical activities that she does enjoy and if possible, ones she can share with you. Roll down a hill, dance, jump, run races, walk, swing, soccer/football -- anything you can do that you both/all enjoy. When we got home from work and before we made dinner, the entire family would crank up some music and have a dance party. We generally ...


5

I think this is a great idea. Although I'm not near a national park, generally speaking it's not much different than letting them play in the backyard. Doctor's typically recommend a certain amount of sun exposure for infants anyway, vitamin D, etc. If you're going to supervise her, which of course you will, then let her have a ball. I wouldn't recommend ...


4

In short: from the time that your child can argue "Putting on more clothes makes me feel discomfort ". As long as the argument is only of the category "I cannot be bothered" your concern for their well-being trumps their argument that they "just dont wanna". But from the time they say "Seriously mom/dad, I'm overheating and sweat because of all this!", ...


4

We started taking our daughter on hikes when she was about 3 months old. Seriously, the most danger is the drive to/from the park and sun burn (getting a kid to wear sunglasses is hard, but a very good idea--essential if you are at elevation, along with a hat). A child w/o sunglasses can burn their cornea in a half hour of playing in the snow at 6,000' ...


4

I happened to come across this thread and wanted to provide some information that I think would be helpful. I am a parent, licensed landscape architect, and certified playground safety inspector. It's important that you know that there are already many guidelines and regulations surrounding public playgrounds that should be adhered to. These standards ...


3

Just do a risk-reward analysis. What is the risk of your daughter playing with one orange once and what is the added benefit of fun and learning with playing with an orange? Many people are ignorant of the chemicals (scary) that are used as pesticides. Even if they are toxic or carcinogenic, they often degrade very quickly, and don't forget the dose makes ...


3

Citrus fruit are commonly waxed in order to extend their transport and shelf life. For baking recipes calling for orange peels or grated lemon skin, you need to specifically buy unwaxed fruit. So that's the most likely agent to get into your baby's mouth. Of course, they cannot really use known poisons here, and the wax tends to be bitter and will stop ...


2

Your wife is correct to be concerned about the pesticides and other filth on the skins of oranges. Sadly, most food these days is produced on large corporate-industrial plantations that use enormous amounts of chemicals and store/transport foods in rat-infested, disgusting conditions. You should validate her concerns about health, instead of telling her that ...


2

I don't have any specific data, other than playing at about 10,000,000 parks in the last few years with my toddlers. (Numbers may be slightly exaggerated.) However, my experience: Rubber (or similar plastics) of the sort that is one giant rubber mat (ie, completely solid, nothing that comes off) is our favorite surface by far. Safe if you fall relative ...


2

I would play the situation through with her, so she can start thinking about how she might process this kind of thing. Say what you would have done or thought. "Hey stop hitting me! What's wrong with you? You want a piece of me?!" Or have your spouse hit you out of nowhere and then model what you would want her to do. Be silly, with a hint of serious. Attack ...


2

Backing your wife up is much more significant than whether your child wears a coat. Be a team. Don't set yourselves up as alternative sources of truth. Your wife may be right or wrong about whether the child needs more clothes, but since it's not life-or-death, once she's voiced the opinion the best thing you can do is to back her up. Say to the child "I ...


2

A combination of both DIY and pre fab would best suit you. Things like slides you may want to replace as your children grow, so I wouldn't got for anything fixed while they are small. Sandpits are relatively easy to construct yourself. If you have grass you can dig out a measured patch, use a weed liner in the bottom. Sleepers can be cut and screwed ...


2

Even as an adult, I find it hard to select the right amount to wear outside, especially if I take a long walk. Even in cold weather, I can go out for a few minutes to take out the trash, for example, without starting to get cold. When I go out for a long walk on a cold day I may be comfortable at first in warm outerwear and then after a while start to ...


1

First off all you should consult a doctor. 

Secondly you will have to take her out for something fun and off course that means you will have to find some kind of game, which has to be of her interest, just ask her to join some sort of running game, for which she will get a reward you know. 

Also you can show her some physical activity videos or cartoon ...


1

I am a terrible judge of warmth because I have thyroid issues. So I tend to personally run hotter or colder than those around me. As such, once a child can talk I trust them to tell me how they feel because I can't assess it for anyone else. Half the time I even change so that I can go from feeling excessively cold to excessively hot in a relatively short ...


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