Hot answers tagged

19

Yes, you absolutely should Your boys are trying to share something valuable and important with you. I doubt you'd be this worried about it if it wasn't digital - what would you do if they wanted to build lego with you? Or draw, or paint? This is the same thing. They want you involved in their activities. I view screen time as more of a necessary evil than ...


14

Don't get into the habit of comparing yourself to others, you'll always find someone who is better at some aspect of parenting that you are, and comparing yourself to them will just make you feel bad about yourself. That isn't to say you shouldn't observe what other parents do and emulate what you think is good (and avoid what isn't), it's a good way to ...


14

Based on the additional information provided in the comments and to paraphrase the question: You are concerned that an unknown male parent in a public park and with their own child of a similar age might abduct/harm your child from right under your nose while you are watching them play a game that has no inappropriate content whatsoever. All this while ...


14

Destructive play is fine as long as it's ok to destroy the object in question. For example, as an adult I still enjoy "destructive play" when I have an old IKEA desk I need to get rid of and can't move out of its room. Taking a sledge hammer to it is both therapeutic and insanely fun. And it's ok, because no one needs or cares about the desk. With kids ...


12

I think it's unrealistic to expect a 2 year old to be able to play by themselves for a long time. Some might, but not all. We tried the "cry it out" technique tonight but we know it'll take more than one instance to break this behavior. Is there a better approach than "cry it out" to break our son of this habit? Wanting to be with his parents ...


10

At that age, it is normal to spend pretty much all her waking time trying to interact with her - remember, the more interaction she has with you, your wife and others now, the faster her brain will develop, and the easier it is for her to learn social skills. That said, be sensible about it - you don't both need to be with her, so take turns - each of you ...


10

A baby's screaming to get your attention is not going to hurt her at all. What she is doing is training you with the behaviour she wants: she screams -> you play with her What you can do is talk to her. At this point it doesn't matter that she can't understand everything you say, but giving a response along the lines of: Just a moment - I'll finish ...


10

Sounds like he's a social kid with a lot of energy. How often does he go out to see other kids? How often does he get outside? My almost-three year old does play with toys, but he's honestly happier 'bouncing around' or outdoors. Kids are unique, and some tend more towards imaginative play with toys, while some tend towards social play. Overall, it ...


10

I don't think you'll find studies on this unfortunately, but the concern with screen time is a very different thing than the concern might be with the Roomba or whatnot. From the American Academy of Pediatrics' statement on Media and Young Minds: Children younger than 2 years need hands-on exploration and social interaction with trusted caregivers to ...


9

Don't overthink it, just do it. (Nearly) every parent is inexperienced with toddlers the first time they have one around, learning on the job is standard. To help with this, toddlers can and will express their needs and wants, usually very loudly. The one area that you do need to get right is rules and discipline. Talk to your girlfriend, copy her regimen ...


9

Yes! I view screen time as more of a necessary evil than anything else. My boys get 30 minutes each per day, and I would be happier if it were less. You've given them a resource (30 min of screen) so let them spend it how they please. They want to spend it with you and that is huge! The interactions we have are not very high quality: occasionally ...


9

You can look into "baby sensory play" to get some ideas of educational (mostly messy and/or elaborate to prepare) activities for toddlers, but I have always preferred the simple classics. Songs and fingerplays: Itsy Bitsy Spider Wheels on the Bus Old McDonald (Extra fun if you have stuffed animals to hold up as you sing about each) Bunny Foofoo ...


8

I'd say the basic premise is to always encourage progression. Stage 1 is to ensure they can do the basics - can they dribble and pass a football or do they know how each chess piece can move? For example, my infant son can't control his direction of travel whilst dribbling a ball, so I ignore the boundaries of the pitch. Stage 2 is for you to demonstrate ...


7

A child of six months really does need a lot of attention. Too little would be of far more concern than any possible damage she could do to herself through screamig (not likely, as established by others already). Giving a child of this age enough attention while still having some: time for yourself, Time to get regular household chores done Time for ...


7

There are a collection of games that are ground-orientated, e.g. not stepping on the floor, not stepping on cracks, walking on rocks or cobbles, etc. There is likely some evolutionary element at play here as humans are very much a ground-orientated species; while we have some capability climbing trees and swimming in water, we are natively ground-dwellers. ...


6

This all depends on where you live. If you live in some countries, where they adore their kids, then this would be considered par for the course. I remember walking down a street with our (then) three year old daughter in one such country. A waitress came out of a cafe, picked her up, and carried her into the shop. 30 seconds later they re-emerged, our ...


5

Rather than starting out with a skateboard, you might want to start them on something one level easier? A kick skate is very popular and relatively cheap to come by, and has several advantages like a handle, easier steering, less risk of flying backward headfirst. When that is mastered, then the skateboard could be next - if it's even interesting at that ...


5

You should not feel that you have to be supplying all of her entertainment. Between daycare and the home life you have described it sounds like your daughter never has to find her own entertainment. This is not something you want to encourage, rather she should be encouraged to learn how to entertain herself and be comfortable with her own company. This ...


5

I can't talk about research - but I can say that my own eldest child appeared to develop "don't step on the cracks" type games naturally and spontaneously while we were out and about in town. It would be reasonable to expect that interaction with the environment would yield games like this without need for any direction or input. Conversely the name 'Lava' ...


5

What a great opportunity to teach communication and compromise. I would separate the kids into those who want to play by the rules and those who want to create their own game. Or play with official rules one time then made up rules next time. Who cares as long as everyone is having fun. I think saying "We will only ever play this game by the rules as ...


5

There have been incredible recent advances in the research on how genes and experience influence development. One of the most important things to take away from the newer research is that it's not a question of two independent forces (nature and nurture) exerting influence in different proportions --- your genetic make up affects the way experience affects ...


4

I don't think there's a clear answer to your question, I think there would be several theories but nobody knows for sure. Children's brains are less developed, and some of humor is definitely learned, however the raw sense of humor that comes genetically is still there. She may be picking up her cue from you, realizing you are doing something funny because ...


4

The signs would be that the child is not happy with the number of activities or is not doing as well as they should do due to lack of time or energy. In the end, the child should be able to do as many activities as they want subject to: the child wanting to do them the parents being willing to pay for them the parents willing to drive them around it not ...


4

Tv is not an answer. At this age the amount of TV should be very, very limited - 1 to 2 hours according to American Academy of Pediatrics - but I'd say that 1h is absolute maximum, seeing how my girl is hooked to tv, watching it with open mount and a thoughtless impression. As for other activties - here are some ideas: Our daughter loves playing with ...


4

I agree mostly with @Mikaveli but I would like to show another point of view based on my own experience (I cant comment yet so I answer). When I was a child my father and me played chess, soccer, videogames... But I always felt he was not doing his best. This annoyed me because I wanted real challenges (which he could have given me) but even with him ...


4

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has the following information about preventing skateboard and scooter injuries: Young children may be at high risk of injury from skateboards and scooters because their judgment of their own skills and strength is often poor, as is their ability to judge foot or vehicular traffic. Their center of gravity is ...


4

Children that age like to be read to, some also like to do puzzles, simple games (including memory). Some kids also really like to be tickled or scared ("I'm a monster and I'm going to eat you, grrr."). Finally, once you are comfortable with each other, you can throw her in the air (watch out for low ceilings, hanging lamps or low doorways) or swing her ...


4

This depends somewhat on the baby's age and whether the baby has any problems with his hips. If a baby is cruising (standing holding on to furniture and taking steps this way), I don't think short periods of gentle upside down swinging is harmful; obviously, don't repeat if the baby isn't enjoying it. I would also add that it shouldn't be done if a baby has ...


4

Your son wants interaction because you're the two people in the world that he cares most about. It is often boring playing on his own, and he isn't getting as much positive feedback by himself — he doesn't know if the thing he's done is worthwhile. There is no silver bullet to address anything with children because every child is different, and every child ...


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