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33

Actually, most studies show the opposite - that having a pet is good for children's health. Specifically, kids exposed to animals when young have a lower risk for developing pet related allergies later in life, and pets in general have been shown to lower stress levels. There are a few diseases that can be passed from a cat to a child, but for a cat who is ...


23

14 months is pretty young to learn to be truly nice to another - he almost certainly has very little empathy at this point. He's not trying to hurt the dog; he's pushing a button that makes a bell ring, basically: cause, effect, nothing more. The fact that the dog doesn't react much is a good thing - it makes it likely to be a shorter phase, rather than if ...


12

My daughter was the same way with her kitten when we first got it (no mouring issues at the same time). Rather than thinking it was about her considering the cat her toy, it was more like an over-exuberance of love for the cat and wanting to have it near all the time. We spoke with her about how true love is shown with respect for the needs and wishes of ...


9

Balanced Mama! There are lots of ways to make sure your kids and your dog are safe from one another. A lot of websites and books exhort you to "always watch your dog and child together," but they don't always tell you what to look for. You want to watch for your dog's very first signs of discomfort, and depending on your dog, these can be very subtle: ...


9

You may have heard the expression "if you've seen one child with autism, you've seen ONE child with autism". "autism" covers such a wide range of behaviors and experiences that it's really hard to make general predictions. Furthermore, age is a big factor here with all children (and cats, for that matter), autistic or not. That said, Dalton's reasoning makes ...


8

Both my daughter (16) and son (13) are high-level autistic (would have been called aspie by the old yardstick). We've had cats their entire lives. Currently we have two cats, a big black labrador, and two guinea pigs. In the past we've also had goldfish and hermit crabs. They've been very good with the pets overall. The cats certainly make a lot more sense ...


8

I was horse crazy since I was old enough to read books about horses. Any child is old enough to ride (I got my own horse when I was sixteen, and taught my four year old sister to ride on my horse, my kids learned to ride when they were seven and eight) but in order to be old enough to be the primary caregiver for a horse a child must have a strong sense of ...


8

Not entirely on topic but still relevant. My wife contracted Toxoplasmosis while she was pregnant with our 3rd child. It all ended well but it was one heck of a cliffhanger and could easily have resulted in our daughter being severely handicapped or dead. We have no idea how my wife contracted it. So a few pointers may be helpful for others: Get yourself ...


8

Many. But which exactly greatly depends on your child and his experiences so far. Some suggestions: Death is final Really. If you are four you haven't necessarily made that experience yet. Families are smaller and live apart, neighbourhoods less connected than a few generations ago. First-hand experience with death is rare even for adults. Death is ...


7

Monica Cellio's answer already mentions recommendations if you own a cat and most of all that you're much more likely to contract toxoplasmosis through undercooked meat (most of the contamination cases) and gardening — you may add insufficiently washed legums and fruits. There are much more informations on the CDC website. I feel it's also important to ...


7

This is an interesting question because it pertains to all expressions of sympathy. I'll presume the dialogue was included to try to make sense of the interaction and her feelings, so an appropriate message can be sent. One of the more helpful explanations of the principles of expressions of sympathy is that comfort should only flow in one direction, and ...


7

Given what a typical 4 year old knows about death, it most likely means nothing, as painful as it may have sounded to you. You know about suffering and death; she does not, especially if she has never experienced someone (or something) close to her dying. According to Child Bereavement UK, children 2 to 5: Often struggle with abstract concepts like ‘...


5

Hi, how are you today? Or, if you really feel the need to say something. I wanted to say that I am sorry for your loss. If you want to talk about it, I am here. And if you don't, I will respect that. In the conversation you posted, your daughter told you to stop talking about it three times, the last time very directly. People deal with loss ...


5

When our cat became sick, we simply explained everything to our kids as it happened. We explained that while some treatments could extend the cat's life, nothing would ultimately work and meanwhile the cat would be in a pretty miserable condition. We explained what euthanasia was, and when it could be used - for instance only for very sick animals, but not ...


4

Riding Do start with lessons at a local riding school with appropriately sized ponies. A kid can start riding as early as 2 years of age (when they can sit upright), but many places that offers lessons have requirements that are usually between 4 and 8 years of age for lessons. When you go look for a place, look for a place that: the horses look well ...


4

I'm not a doctor of any kind. even "obvious" answers shouldn't be withheld. Torturing animals is often a sign of serious psychopathic personality disorders. This point is made clear in every serial-killer documentary on YouTube, and validated by this article I just found, which states just that, almost verbatim. there are many types of IATC (...


3

Speaking as a parent with a dog, three cats, some fish and snails, and a 5-yr-old and a 34-month-old, time will be your best friend here. For our kids, we focus more on treating the animals gently (no chasing the cats, no pulling the dog's ears, remember the pet is a living creature, etc) and less on caring for the pets. Your best bet is to model the ...


3

On the other end of the spectrum, teaching your child how to interact with the dog is just as important as training the dog out of behaviors like mouthing (fwiw, we had great luck with a spritzer filled with Bitter Apple; one squirt and the dog was all "Blech! Not mouthing any more EVAH."). We have a huge fur rug that some people call a Newfoundland. He's a ...


3

Many pet stores have a guarantee period. In my town they all offer 7 days; if I take the fish back to the store, along with a sample of the water from the tank, they test it, determine whether the death was caused by water conditions, improper handling, or possibly a condition the fish had before purchase (and in the latter case, they offer a replacement). ...


3

Most kids will be just fine - in fact, you may lower their risks of allergies. An outdoor cat is actually more of a health hazard than an indoor cat, because they have access to wild prey which can transmit diseases like toxoplasmosis. Even so, the risk is minimal as long as the child doesn't have access to the cat's poop. So either put the litterbox up out ...


3

The trick in my experience is carefully monitoring and assisting in the interaction to keep everyone safe and calm. I've done this with my niece and currently with my little one. I will sit with the child and hold their hands and help them pet the cat. I make sure the baby isn't getting grabby and keep hands away from certain parts of the cat (tail, face, ...


2

Allergies to cats are believed by many sourced to be cause by saliva, urine and dander. Allergies to pollen brought in on cat's fur have also occaisionally been mistaken for an actual allergy to cat's fur itself. Before I suggest strategies to help combat allergies, I'd like to stress the importance of actually be sure as whether your child has an allergy ...


2

I have a similar situation, except my kid is tiny, and my dog is a 73 kg great dane. So the dog doesn't really register the kids "abuses" unless the kid sticks his finger in the dogs eyes or up his nose. Fortunately for us as well, the dog is totally mellow even in those circumstances. Every kid is different, so your mileage might vary, but the ...


2

As a recent owner of Corgi pup, I have also thought and sought advice for this particular aspect. What I can tell from my experience and recommendations from other owners/trainers: 1) how to avoid jumping on people - when a pup jumps, simply put your hands in front and block the way with words 'down' or 'no'. if the dog keeps jumping, push the dog with ...


1

There are two actual questions you could be asking: What should one say to a child whose pet has just died? How can I rectify an apparently-bungled approach to a discussion with a child whose pet has just died? You have given information which suggests that your relationship with your daughter is not as strong as you'd desire: a cat you've never known (...


1

My kids are not autistic, so I don't have any experience to you here. I do, however, have quite a but experience with cats, and cats & my kids. Our cats have always been indoor cats, and in my mind they behave very similar to outdoors cats, or any cats not 'feral'. Even the barn kitty at the barn I board is very similar, she wants to be petted and ...


1

Like some people say, take him to a shelter and see how he reacts with animals...In addition to that, I will give an advice: if you decide to get a cat, choose a older one. Why? Older cats (more than 1 yo) have their character defined, if they say: "he/she is very kind", it's 99.9% true. A kitty...yeah, they're stinking cute, but also a time bomb: you don't ...


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