17

Pacifiers aren't magic. If something else is bothering a baby, a pacifier only calms them for a short while. This is useful, for example, if you need a baby to calm down for a few minutes while you fix a bottle, but you have to address the underlying need in short order or the baby just spits the pacifier out and gets madder than ever. On plane trips, ...


9

That sounds perfectly normal! You might wait a few months before trying again, giving your daughter time to adjust to all the change she is experiencing. Give her time to grow into her role as big sister before you start toilet training again. When you start again, don't try to do toilet training and binky separation at the same time. A binky, like thumb-...


6

You may not like to hear this, but how about not giving her a pacifier? I grew up without ever having one. My daughter is well beyond that age and never had one. My mother always told me (unverified) that they increase the chances you'll need braces. It doesn't harm her not to have one, so why worry?


5

Failure to sleep at night in newborns is usually caused by a lack of (or failure to establish) a circadian rhythm; in other words, it's as normal as can be, and a source of great consternation in new parents (I mean, who explains this to new parents? Hardly anyone.) I have cared for hundreds of newborns, and I can honestly say I do not believe in nipple ...


4

Sterilization using solely water or steam would indeed take more than five minutes. Steam that is just at 100°C would take close to an hour and a half to completely sterilize the vessels - and a better process is to repeat it several times (Tyndallization, referenced in that article as well). However, you're not just using steam here; you're also washing ...


3

I fly a lot, and have done for the last 40 years, and while there is the occasional inconsolable baby, most flights are relatively peaceful. Even crying babies are often soothed, but they usually want cuddles rather than a pacifier, and cuddles can be tricky at takeoff and landing. When my kids were young we found a pacifier or a bottle did help a lot, but ...


2

My baby girl is almost 3 months and she kept waking up almost every hour for her pacifier. I was losing so much sleep and she was becoming very cranky too. At first this was only at night, then she started waking up for her dummy during the day too. I decided to take away her dummy and test how she would do... she is very happy when she is awake with no ...


2

We decided to enter our 2.5 year old's imaginative world to help him lose his dependency. The focus was on replacing it with something more appropriate for his age - a cuddly toy. About a week before we wanted to throw out the pacifier, every night we'd reiterate the same thing: He's a growing big boy and soon he'll be too big for a pacifier; We will use ...


2

I realize this was posted a long time ago, but I figured I'd answer so that when other moms search the topic, this might help. This happens to me with my six week old. This is the conclusion I've drawn... The only real option, I'm realizing, is to gently hold it in her mouth (almost just catching it as it begins to fall from her mouth) until she's in a deep ...


2

Not every baby takes a pacifier. While they may be magical devices for the little ones who will, some simply refuse them. My son has never liked them - he'd take it for less than ten seconds and then kick it out. Additionally, some parents avoid them for their own reasons. Some of these reasons are backed in science, others are not. In general, there are ...


2

It's not uncommon for a new infant to bring about "baby behavior" in their older siblings. This is partly due to the older child noticing that the younger one is getting a lot of attention - and they are suddenly not getting as much attention as they used to. They revert to bottles, diapers, or in your daughters case, her "soother". I would suggest getting ...


1

We were pacifier-free by nine months; I don't remember exactly when but it was a bit before that I think. The daycare we went to was very supportive and required pacifier-free children before they moved up to the one year old room, which was nice as it meant no other pacifiers to confuse things. It's generally considered easier to remove the younger you do ...


1

The other option is they suck their thumb/fingers. You probably don't want to go there if you can help it. You can take away a pacifier, you can't take away their thumb. All my children were avid thumb suckers until school age, and I'd trade all the talks and gimmicks we tried to get them to stop, for the ability to have simply taken it away and dealt ...


1

Like you said, it's hard to find any hard science on this. It seems like there's considerable disagreement about pacifiers, and I'm not an expert. Having said that, my opinion is that you aren't crazy at all for wanting to wean the baby off the pacifier at the same time that you change the nap schedule. I haven't met any one that regretted weaning their ...


1

To paraphrase the question: Children have an on/off button that stops crying. Children crying on airplanes are annoying. The asker wonders why parents don't use the on off button on airplanes. The answer: The assumption 1. is wrong.


1

No, pacifiers don't always work. Using the pacifier too many times when the baby clearly doesn't want it and you will actually increase the crying. It's usually obvious when the baby doesn't want the pacifier. The baby will open his mouth to drop the pacifier. The baby will wriggle his head out of the way of the pacifier when you try to give it to him a ...


1

I had similar problem with my daughter at that age. In our case we solved it by cup feeding. She could sort of 'lick' the milk from the cup and this way I could feed her. I had to be patient - it's slow process and takes practice. But major advantage is that feeding this way does not mess up child's ability to breastfeed effectively so it does not impact ...


1

LINK to ADA discussion on tooth development So, it seems that use before teeth start to come in is fine. Like thumb-sucking, stopping it early is the way to go. Also, if thumb-sucking and pacifier use goes beyond the 'norm', then it might be a problem, but is usually not a significant factor in speech development. LINK speech path


1

I'm not a parent but I know people that got their kids to stop using binkys. Let them use them, but each week cut a little snip off the tip. After two or so months there won't be any left. Most likely they'll not want it any more though before it even gets to that point. You just gotta make sure they don't find any full ones or it ruins it


1

All the sudden attention the new baby is getting is likely to perturb your 3-year-old, due either to jealousy of the new interloper, or fear of your loss of interest and attention, or a bit of both. It's quite normal for older siblings to regress somewhat when there are stressful changes in their immediate environment, partly because it feels easy and ...


1

I totally agree with not giving her one at all, we gave our son one and I wish we never did, if she does take it make sure you dont make the mistake we did and that was not taking it off him early, he is 4 now and still asks for it.


1

I agree with the suggestions that you don't use the pacifier at all. However, have you yet found the pacifiers with the little stuffed animal attached? It's there to add weight and stability to the pacifier and keeps it on the baby's chest. They look like a pacifier with a beanie baby sewed to the part that we grip. Good luck, and probably your little one is ...


1

We roll a soft blanket and lay it along side of her. She sleeps with her head turned sideways so this allows the soother to stay propped but if she needs to push it out of her mouth she still can. Doesn't always work but buys us time. Hate constantly getting up to put it back in! She is 2 months old.


1

Well I created a strap for my baby's pacifier and it works great. It's loose enough that she can spit it out when she really doesn't want it while still being snug enough for her to use her little fist to pop it back in if it slips out a little by accident. I never use it at night though and I'm a very vigilant mommy anyway, so she is always in front of me ...


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