13

Taken from this comment. It might work for some toddlers.


12

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices ...


11

If your child is younger than 12 months, I would refrain from giving cow's milk altogether, see What Happens If a Newborn Drinks Cow Milk? and Cow's milk: When and how to introduce it. Problems which can occur are nutritional deficiencies (most commonly iron deficiency), gastrointestinal irritation or allergic reactions. In general, babies' digestive tracts ...


10

For most children, cow's milk (organic or not at your preference) will be the superior choice. Whole milk is usually recommended from 1-2 years old, although there is starting to be some preference for 2% even at that age for children at high risk and who have good, healthy diets with plenty of fats and vegetables (like my second, who at 18 months though an ...


10

At this age, we supplemented breastfeeding with about 4 ounces of soup plus some fruits and veggies per day. Keep in mind that this is just a single data point and and not a statistical sampling or a guideline. There are no nutritional guidelines that I am aware of about soup at this age. Some babies like soup and some do not. As long as the child has enough ...


7

I get my 2 year old to eat eggs with this simple "pancake" recipe: Beat one egg in a little container, add 2-3 tablespoons of oats (1minute or 5minute, no problem!), a little dash of vanilla extract. Mix well and store covered in the fridge overnight so the oatmeal absorbs all the liquid. In the morning, heat a bit of butter in a pan and cook as you would a ...


7

In terms of eating healthily, you need to practice what you preach. Do you have unhealthy foods in your house? If so, why? If, for example, you eat ice cream several days a week, why is it a bad move on her part to do so? What is health, and why should we care about it? This is a multifaceted issue, and teaching by example is better than words. Self-esteem ...


6

Basically: have a healthy diet in your house! At mealtimes and during cooking, talk about the food, how good it is, and if you want to go into details, about how it has vitamins, good fat, fibre or whatever makes it the "right" food. Also, talk about how tasty it is, hand out samples for them, have them involved in the preparation of food whenever possible. ...


5

Few things you can try are: Make sure he's getting enough vitamin C which helps with Iron absorption. Limit dairy with meals as calcium in cow's milk inhibits absorption. Make him a smoothie out of fresh spinach and some fruit. The spinach is high in iron and does well blended up with fruit. For finger food snacks, plain old Cheerios are a good source of ...


5

DHA and EPA are long-chain omega-3 fatty acids which cannot be synthesized by the human body and thus must be ingested either through capsules (which is usually fish oil) or through the foods that we eat. They typically are found together and work both in conjunction with each other and independently of each other to support proper neurological, ...


5

Our solutions after much trial and error: Texture: One egg scrambled and cooked in a large pan so that it comes out very thin. Can be folded into a sandwich or wrapped around a sausage. Flavor: Hard boiled egg - sliced and served with salsa and cheese (egg nachos) Disguise: Scrambled and stir fried with rice and veggies


5

After reading Ellen Sattyr's book "How to Get Your Kid to Eat but Not Too Much" our policy is: 1. One dinner is prepared, everyone (baby/toddler included) gets a plate with appropriate portions, and they don't have to eat any of it. We make no comments on what they eat, or why they need to eat it. 2. Some known neutral side is presented (bread, tortilla ...


5

Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. However, if a kid learns from his parents that he is expected to be hyper after eating sugar, well, you can guess what will happen when he gets sugar. Even with that trained response, I don't think there's any plausible reason that sugar would cause bad behavior the next day.


5

"Considering that Matthew's craving for sugar is relentless, intense and has been ongoing for years, is it possible that his craving represents a legitimate nutritional need?" I've never heard of such a need personally. But you strike me as a grounded, sensible person trying very hard to find the best path for their child. I think offering a non-sugar ...


5

Most kids will eat fairly well and self manage if you set the right boundary conditions and stop making a fuss about it, which makes it into a an attention-grabbing power struggle. Things that can help are Routine & Consistency: set fixed meal times every day. Sit down with the family and do a little fun ritual (sing, clap, yodle, whatever) Make sure ...


4

I scrambled some eggs up and added them to some pancake batter for my son. He never knew! I'm also going to experiment adding breadcrumbs to eggs and see if the texture is different enough for him like that for days I don't want to make pancakes


4

I noticed that someone suggested offering lots of fruits. Fruits are not good for weight gain. My son is very underweight and we found we were feeding him too many fruits and he was not gaining well at all. We thought it as healthy for him, and it is in moderation, but not to pack on the pounds like he needed. Our pediatrician recommended carnation instant ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


4

Please see the full text of the review by Imdad et al (2017) for the benefits and side effects of the supplementation. This review (and my answer) does not address recommendations for areas without vitamin A deficiency. Note that giving too much vitamin A can be harmful (Hypervitaminosis A). Therefore, like any supplement, vitamin A supplements should ...


3

By 8 months to 1 year, we were feeding both of our children what we ate - no difference. Obviously if you haven't gone through very many foods yet (and thus have allergy concerns), limit this to what you've tried already; we started solids around 4 months so by 8 months had hit all of the high notes there. What's nutritious for you is also nutritious for ...


3

A friend of mine had a 10 year old daughter who was losing hair and quite skinny. The family is Hindu and very vegetarian. When the daughter stopped eating enough then it was very easy for her to become malnourished. The mother would make her nice lunches that the child would just throw away at school. She would only have small meals at home. Being super-...


3

It is known that the composition of breast milk changes over time, to account for different nutrition needs when the baby grows up. I think that is the reason behind different formula milk types for different ages. But: Considering that you should start supplementing milk with solid foods after a few months (ask two different doctors when to start this, ...


3

I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned! While there is no difference in health benefits between bottled breast milk and nursed breast milk in the case of a single feeding, there would be a significant difference if nursing were ended completely and a pump and bottle came between mother and child 100% of the time. The nipple is bidirectional. We think of ...


3

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding with complementary foods for a year, while the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding with complementary foods up to two years of age and beyond. ...


3

I suggest that you let them eat when they are hungry rather than just at the times most people eat. After I started doing this, I rarely get indigestion. YMMV. You could establish "conventional" meal timings starting on any chosen weekend by giving your kids a super small meal before a major meal at a chosen time. Hopefully, they will be hungry then. IMHO, ...


3

The main benefit is that in our society, people are expected to eat at mealtimes. Sometimes people who eat in class, or at their desk, or on public transit are perceived as being odd or rude for doing so. People who don't eat much when they're offered a meal are also sometimes seen as being odd or rude. Being able to be hungry for a bit, or scaling what you ...


3

There are lots and lots of reasons to restrict the processed sugar that kids consume, but behavior problems the next day isn't one of them! There was a comment that your wife is looking for something blame. Maybe she is looking for something that she can tell you to get you to stop giving him sugar. Perhaps you should stop giving him sugar.


3

As an adult I recently overcame my sugar-habit by drinking copious amounts of zero-sugar cola every time I felt the craving coming on. Sometimes I would drink 2 litres a day. Of course I became worried that the artificial sweetener was just as damaging. However once the sugar addiction had gone, I found it easy to give up the cola as well. Now I need neither ...


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