22

The beauty of breastfeeding is that it’s a pretty self-regulating process and that mother and baby adapt to each other quickly. Speaking from experience, I had two very different babies. One would leisurely feed for half an hour (slowly but constantly, clearly enjoying the time), the other was done in just a few minutes. She still has a rather no-nonsense ...


10

For most children, cow's milk (organic or not at your preference) will be the superior choice. Whole milk is usually recommended from 1-2 years old, although there is starting to be some preference for 2% even at that age for children at high risk and who have good, healthy diets with plenty of fats and vegetables (like my second, who at 18 months though an ...


10

At this age, we supplemented breastfeeding with about 4 ounces of soup plus some fruits and veggies per day. Keep in mind that this is just a single data point and and not a statistical sampling or a guideline. There are no nutritional guidelines that I am aware of about soup at this age. Some babies like soup and some do not. As long as the child has enough ...


7

In terms of eating healthily, you need to practice what you preach. Do you have unhealthy foods in your house? If so, why? If, for example, you eat ice cream several days a week, why is it a bad move on her part to do so? What is health, and why should we care about it? This is a multifaceted issue, and teaching by example is better than words. Self-esteem ...


6

Basically: have a healthy diet in your house! At mealtimes and during cooking, talk about the food, how good it is, and if you want to go into details, about how it has vitamins, good fat, fibre or whatever makes it the "right" food. Also, talk about how tasty it is, hand out samples for them, have them involved in the preparation of food whenever possible. ...


5

"Considering that Matthew's craving for sugar is relentless, intense and has been ongoing for years, is it possible that his craving represents a legitimate nutritional need?" I've never heard of such a need personally. But you strike me as a grounded, sensible person trying very hard to find the best path for their child. I think offering a non-sugar ...


5

Most kids will eat fairly well and self manage if you set the right boundary conditions and stop making a fuss about it, which makes it into a an attention-grabbing power struggle. Things that can help are Routine & Consistency: set fixed meal times every day. Sit down with the family and do a little fun ritual (sing, clap, yodle, whatever) Make sure ...


5

Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. However, if a kid learns from his parents that he is expected to be hyper after eating sugar, well, you can guess what will happen when he gets sugar. Even with that trained response, I don't think there's any plausible reason that sugar would cause bad behavior the next day.


5

After reading Ellen Sattyr's book "How to Get Your Kid to Eat but Not Too Much" our policy is: 1. One dinner is prepared, everyone (baby/toddler included) gets a plate with appropriate portions, and they don't have to eat any of it. We make no comments on what they eat, or why they need to eat it. 2. Some known neutral side is presented (bread, tortilla ...


5

Few things you can try are: Make sure he's getting enough vitamin C which helps with Iron absorption. Limit dairy with meals as calcium in cow's milk inhibits absorption. Make him a smoothie out of fresh spinach and some fruit. The spinach is high in iron and does well blended up with fruit. For finger food snacks, plain old Cheerios are a good source of ...


4

I used to boil a week's worth of various fruits and vegetables (no added salt), puree them individually, set a bit aside for the weekend, pour them in ice cube trays and put them in the freezer. Then we'd take them out as needed every weekday morning and add some oil, put it in a jar to defrost by lunchtime at daycare where they'd warm it up and feed it to ...


4

Please see the full text of the review by Imdad et al (2017) for the benefits and side effects of the supplementation. This review (and my answer) does not address recommendations for areas without vitamin A deficiency. Note that giving too much vitamin A can be harmful (Hypervitaminosis A). Therefore, like any supplement, vitamin A supplements should ...


3

As an adult I recently overcame my sugar-habit by drinking copious amounts of zero-sugar cola every time I felt the craving coming on. Sometimes I would drink 2 litres a day. Of course I became worried that the artificial sweetener was just as damaging. However once the sugar addiction had gone, I found it easy to give up the cola as well. Now I need neither ...


3

There are lots and lots of reasons to restrict the processed sugar that kids consume, but behavior problems the next day isn't one of them! There was a comment that your wife is looking for something blame. Maybe she is looking for something that she can tell you to get you to stop giving him sugar. Perhaps you should stop giving him sugar.


3

The main benefit is that in our society, people are expected to eat at mealtimes. Sometimes people who eat in class, or at their desk, or on public transit are perceived as being odd or rude for doing so. People who don't eat much when they're offered a meal are also sometimes seen as being odd or rude. Being able to be hungry for a bit, or scaling what you ...


3

I suggest that you let them eat when they are hungry rather than just at the times most people eat. After I started doing this, I rarely get indigestion. YMMV. You could establish "conventional" meal timings starting on any chosen weekend by giving your kids a super small meal before a major meal at a chosen time. Hopefully, they will be hungry then. IMHO, ...


3

By 8 months to 1 year, we were feeding both of our children what we ate - no difference. Obviously if you haven't gone through very many foods yet (and thus have allergy concerns), limit this to what you've tried already; we started solids around 4 months so by 8 months had hit all of the high notes there. What's nutritious for you is also nutritious for ...


3

I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned! While there is no difference in health benefits between bottled breast milk and nursed breast milk in the case of a single feeding, there would be a significant difference if nursing were ended completely and a pump and bottle came between mother and child 100% of the time. The nipple is bidirectional. We think of ...


3

How to boost her self-esteem and make her eat healthier? I don't think you can do both at once. Your goals seem mutually exclusive to me, especially if stated in the same sentence (meaning these two problems are connected in your mind). It doesn't seem like you want her to eat healthier; from your question it seems like you don't want her to gain weight -...


2

I'm 25, and I love eggs, but I hate the texture. My solution is I eat them in toast. I cook them over-easy so the yolk is still runny, and then I mash the whole thing to pieces with my fork. After that I put it on buttered toast and eat it like a little egg sandwich. When I have more time I put hash browns on my toast as well, and sometimes bacon or sausage ...


2

Iron Sources (see also link) dried herbs beans and pulses fortified cereals bran sun-dried tomatoes artichokes prunes tempeh vital wheat gluten whole wheat bread dark turkey meat chicken leg and breast thuna halibut pork chops beef and lamb Factors that Increase Iron Absorption meat proteins: increase nonheme iron absorption vitamin C and A: C increases ...


2

My toddler isn't too fond of eggs either. One thing we do for him is make french toast since toast is often served when we have eggs for breakfast it really isn't that much extra work to make. Another thing we do is finely scramble them and add them to his oatmeal. It sounds weird but you can't taste it at all and the texture is very similar to the oats. ...


2

From the outset, I am not a scientist, and have read a bit about sugar and diet to try and understand things better. What follows is my understanding about sugar. There may be some mistakes here, but I'll try and reference information where I can. It largely depends on what you define as "deprive". If you completely remove all sugars from a child's diet (...


2

Dr David Ludwig and Dr Walter Willet published a 2013 opinion column in JAMA Pediatrics that questioned the value of recommending low-fat or skim milk for children. While much of the article is behind a paywall, I did find a discussion of the opinion column (and it was also discussed on Time). Ludwig and Willett argued in their paper that children who ...


2

I basically told my kids that there were certain types of foods that gave their bodies things that their bodies needed to grow strong and to play. There were other types of foods that taste great, but don't help their bodies as much. Then I told them that in order to not get sick and to be able to play as much as they wanted, it was important to eat more of ...


1

Did children (humans) have access to refined sugar in the last several million years? Obviously not, they mostly only had a rather limited supply of fruit sugar. So, absent any special medical condition, children do not need refined sugar. Otherwise we as a species wouldn't have survived. Sugar in its refined form is mainly pure energy in a form that's ...


1

There are a few possible motivations for starting a diet. Actually being overweight. While this may seem a good reason for a child to be on a diet, it's actually still not highly advisable. Restricting calorie intake and snacks can lead to an unhealthy relationship with food and poor self-image in the long term, and raise the risk of eating disorders. It's ...


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