10

Kids go through developmental stage changes and when they do their sleep and eating patterns often change with the child. At two, this is very likely at least a part of what is going on. Having said that, you did have a couple of things going on that might have been counter-productive to your child's sleep as well so even though they are no longer part ...


5

The sudden step back might have a physical cause (tooth breaking through, coming down with a fever, stomach cramps from a change of diet, whatever), in which case the problem will be short-lived and go away once the physical cause disappears. If not, read on. Any advice? Yes: Do whatever works. Don't fall for all the parenting advice that tells you ...


4

Given your description, it is not paranormal, it is NORMAL :) These are called night terrors, which children in that age have, and they are perfectly normal. You may still want to check this out with your pediatrician, since the normal age for night terrors to develop is 3 years old+ (though children as young as 6 mos. can also have them). If you want to ...


3

it sounds to me like your son is sleepwalking. This is a sleep "disorder" and is more common in children than in adults. During sleepwalking episodes, a person appears to be awake, but is in fact very much asleep. In fact, they are usually in one of the deepest parts of the sleep cycle. Sleepwalkers don't just "walk"- they perform all kinds of activities ...


3

If this is, indeed, a psychological problem and not a physical condition (do have a doctor look at his leg if his discomfort doesn't seem to be going away) you might try giving him something that will "keep the bugs away". It doesn't actually have to be bug repellent; the two of you could get together and figure out what smells bugs hate and make him an "...


3

This is so incredibly common. We had this with both of our children. We used the Dr. Ferber method successfully. Briefly: Soothing yourself back to sleep is a skill babies must learn. You want them to know you are there for them while also giving them the opportunity to self-soothe. To teach this, the "Ferber method" is to put them to bed while they are ...


3

Some ideas you could consider (these are all based on personal experience): prewarm the crib with a warm hot water bottle get the baby to sleep in a sling-type carrier, and when it's time to transfer to the crib, bend over and undo the carrier at the shoulder, so you can gently set the baby and the sling down on the crib together. noise machine or radio ...


3

At this age, a smaller bassinet with close sides might feel more comfortable than a giant crib.


3

It may be that when she wakes up, she's disoriented and therefore scared. Put a night light in her room so that it's not dark when she wakes up. Then, have an extended story time for a few nights. Sit in the room with her, lit only by the night light (if you can manage it) and tell her stories. Get her used to the look of the room when it's dark, get ...


3

Night noise is linked to insomnia and lower sleep duration. This link is mostly supported by multiple research studies. This association was considered substantial enough for the World Health Organisation (WHO) to issue the night noise guidelines in 2009 (see below). I show 2 relevant research studies below, but one can quickly find multiple other research ...


2

We found that the best way to troubleshoot this problem was to closely examine her routines--specifically when she was getting up, when she was taking naps, and what she was doing before bedtime. After reviewing this, a few things became clear: She did not have a consistent wake and nap schedule, waking between 9-11:30 AM and going to bed around 10 PM (but ...


2

I know a lot of people say 'by so and so age, a baby should be able to sleep through the night'. However, almost every parent I know have reported their babies wake up at least one time a night until 12 months, many longer. (What I suspect is that they don't NEED food at night from a medical standpoint, which tiny babies does). When your wife picks up the ...


2

The most simple answer would be to restore the pacifier. Pacifier use up until 12 months or longer isn't any issue If the only thing that has changed is the pacifier let them keep using it. As with most things in life you have to make a choice. Is sleeping through the night, for you, your wife and you child more important than the reason you decided to ...


2

My wife and I went through Night Terrors when our daughter was around your son's age. She would wake up screaming, hands balled in fists and shaking as though she saw something absolutely horrific. Talk about a terrifying experience for a parent. First: I wouldn't be terribly concerned with the bad attitude. Lack of sleep makes everyone grumpy. I would ...


2

I wonder if it's possible this is night terrors. She seems a little young for this to be starting, but the predictability of it gave me that idea. One of my children had one isolated experience of this, and what really struck me was that I couldn't establish any eye contact with him while it was going on. But he didn't remember it the next day, just as ...


2

Both of my children had night terrors beginning around 14-18 months old. There can be environmental triggers to them and they are also tied to the sleep cycle. So if your daughter is having them every hour for a few hours, that sounds consistent with a trigger. Check the temperature of her room, if it's warm, try cooling it down. If it's cold, try warming ...


2

In regards to nightmares or night terrors. These are real and like an illness this means all consequences change. You cannot teach anyone to be well when they are sick or how to not have a nightmare. This is the age for nightmares. If you think it is possible that she is having bad dreams, perhaps you could camp out in her room to make sure. Knowing what you ...


2

I am in my 50s, and sometimes I struggle with the same thing! Some things I find helpful: Leaving a light on in the next room Running a fan Sitting up and reading until I am really sleepy Music or television on with really low volume A lot of people find sleeping with a pet helpful. Maybe that is an option for you? Good luck.


2

From personal experience which happens to match what Dr. Harvey Karp suggested in the Happiest Baby on the Block: I am much more vigorous with my calming techniques (rocking, shushing, etc.) than my wife is. I believe the baby responds more to me because of that added vigor, especially when the baby is extremely upset. A similar difference in techniques ...


1

My son had a few instances of Night Terrors at about this same age. I thought he was awake as he would physically get out of bed, so he was actively moving around, scream/crying at the top of his lungs. I found out later that it was thought to be from over-stimulation. My son seemed inconsolable at the time. I successfully got him to calm down during one ...


1

Here's two things that worked for us in a similar scenario, each is based on the simple psychological principle of positive reinforcement. (1) Kids that age can't tell the time yet, but they can tell if a lamp is on or off. So, we made a big deal/even out of creating a small grid of squares that we decorated together and put on her closet door. The grid ...


1

You did it very well by changing the pattern in feeding, it is just that the baby is still used to be fed quite often. From what you comment, your baby used to eat several times during the night, say every 3-4 hours. Now he sleeps for 8 hours in a row and then wakes up feeling hungry: that is completely normal! Just feed him normally at that time for a ...


1

First of all: It is always hard to stop with breast feeding. For the night however and for sure at the age of your daughter there is quite quickly no need for any drinking during the night even with breast feeding (for younger kids please ask a specialist when this starts). It is however more likely that sleeping through the night takes longer when breast ...


1

When my baby was that little, we got her to sleep in the crib using a travel co-sleeper. It's like a bassinet without legs, and is intended for putting in the parent's bed between the parents so that you have a safe place to put the baby during trips. We put the co-sleeper directly in the crib, so she would be used to the crib itself, but still have the ...


1

It's pretty normal for a baby to stay awake an hour after waking up completely, really I'm surprised it isn't a little longer. If she does that then what you are doing now is a good method, or you could just let her talk to herself. either way she would probably go back to sleep after. Now about your first question. I'm going to guess that she is in a ...


1

She might be too hot. (Being too hot gives me nightmares!) Try adjusting her bedding. This may sound weird, but have you tried taking off her nappy and encouraging her to pee on a potty? She might be waking because her bladder is full.


1

Try giving her a quick snack. My 11 month old has started waking around the same time as your daughter. It dawned on me - he's probably hungry even though he has 3 meals a day plus snacks. He's doing a lot of growing right now, and might even be having a growth spurt. He seems to have calmed down tonight after having some puréed apple and a drink of water. ...


1

I have twins that are still waking several times per night and they are 18 months now. We've spoke with different pediatricians and there are several causes (besides being hungry) like growing teeth, bad dreams, feeling the need to be close to the parents, etc. You can't do too much besides waiting for this period to finish. It's pretty hard to predict when ...


1

While it could be very bad dreams, in general, waking from dreams can be caused by almost anything that causes you to be more wakeful - any dream can be scary, as others have noted on other questions. Some things to pay attention to: Clothing and bedding. Did anything change with the pajamas? Did you change detergents or get a new kind of pajama that ...


1

My pediatrician suggested melatonin for the exact same thing you're going through. It is a nightmare. I'm sorry to be able to relate to your frustration. Try melatonin. The gummies do not work. Get the liquid and mix it in with a drink or there are quick dissolve. This seems to help my 2-year-old. There are nights that it doesn't work at all. I'm trying to ...


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