12

One of the most valuable pieces of information I've picked up from parenting books comes during the introductory chapters of "The Whole-Brain Child" by Dan Siegel and Tina Bryson. In it, they tell the story of a small child who witnessed his caregiver have a medical emergency in the car, which resulted in a minor accident which resulted in the caregiver ...


7

First, how lucky you are to experience no nightmares. Most people experience nightmares commonly. When one understands some of the purposes of dreaming, it's not really a surprise. Second, your hypnagogic sleep a disorder that is heritable. This is probably one of the reasons your child has night terrors. Luckily, these terrors aren't as bad as they sound. ...


4

Perhaps this is just a difficult time and she is getting used to be separate from her mother (after all she has been with you her whole life) now she must learn to be separate. I think babies learn very quickly that if they cry they get comfort, and so if she is crying at night repeatedly then perhaps she has already learned this ;) I don't think crying ...


3

My daughter did the same at 7 - would even insist some nights that she wanted to sleep in my bed from the start. I just kept trying gently: starting her in her bed getting fancy bed covers in her favorite color with designs... and not being upset with her at all when I woke up to find her. She will sort this out, mine did before she was 9 (she is a teen ...


3

Oof, that sounds miserable. I am not a doctor, and this is not a forum for medical advice, yet that report sounds like it may be worth talking to a doctor, if it is disruptive to normal sleep. There are myriad, innumerable causes for problematic sleep patterns in little ones, a lot of which involve situational/circumstantial stimuli around lights/screens, ...


2

My daughter spent a night in a hospital after getting into the neighbors psychiatric drugs. We didn't actually have to do anything except love her and be sensitive to her emotional state. After we got home she played hospital with her dolls for a week or so, reenacting the IV insertion and blood drawing on a regular basis. She remembered it for a long ...


2

The nighttime and naptime behavior does sound like pretty classic night terrors (screaming/incoherent, shaking/shivering, happens upon waking up from sleep or between sleep cycles), but having "night terrors" while entirely awake is not usual/normal. Sudden tantrums with no obvious cause, or sudden severe mood swings in toddlers and pre-schoolers are not ...


2

My kids often came into our bed in the middle of the night, making sleep less comfortable. I just put mattresses on the floor and started putting them to bed in our bedroom. They seemed very content with this arrangement, and never crawled into our bed. As they got older and more self-(confident? sufficient? other?), they moved back into their rooms. As ...


1

Our 3 year old daughter had a ruptured appendix and was a few hours from dying. She had emergency surgery and was hospitalised for 6 days. It was a massive trauma to us all, and of course we're grateful that she's still alive and well. Not long ago we'd have been helpless.... Anyway, she's 5 and half now, and has never been able to have pink children's ...


1

I think you did great. When anyone has nightmares, the first help is to assure her (or him, does not matter) that there is a safe place for her. Just holding her and say that everything is ok now, that you are here to protect her from anything - it is the first thing and most important, of what you can do. (At my personal experience it is more important ...


1

I see no issues with what you did, clearly it reassured her enough that she was happy to return to sleep. It may be worth incorporating the following techniques into aftercare for a bad dream in future though. I've found this to be helpful not only for children, but also adults. Often we are woken from negative dreams whilst the stimuli are still scary. ...


1

I am not a doctor, and you probably want to seek medical advice, but one possibility could be that the child has reflux. Sometimes the valve connecting the child's esophagus to the stomach is underdeveloped, and doesn't completely close. When the child is awake (vertical), there are no issues, but when they lie down, some of the stomach acid leaks into the ...


1

I wasn't going to put this as an answer as I feel it could be better, but due to length... If you want medical advice, then you really need to see a medical professional. I presume it was one who diagnosed you with "hypnagogic sleeping"? As for bad dreams, I have them all of the time and always have — as well as good dreams. Sugar or a full bladder ...


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