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2

TL;DR: Six weeks old is too early for self-soothing. REFERENCES: Don’t start too young. Parents frequently ask at what age they should start a progressive-waiting approach. It is difficult to give a precise answer to this question, but there are some guidelines. Most children start to sleep through the night on their own within three or four months after ...


4

Tummy time is important, because it’s the natural way to strengthen not just the neck muscles, but the whole set of core muscles, including back and to a degree stomach. This means it’s an important factor to turn over, then learn to crawl and at some point start walking. Nevertheless, a lot of babies dislike being put face down on the ground or a blanket, ...


2

Part of the answer is maths. Your baby is growing in all three dimensions, not just height. Growth in height from 56cm to 62cm is an 11% increase. An 11% increase in all 3 dimensions multiplies up to a 36% increase in volume, and hence weight. 3.2kg plus 36% works out to 4.3kg, which is not far from the 4.6kg he actually is. The extra is because he is ...


3

You are correct, some "tummy time" (as we call it in the UK), properly monitored during the day is good for them to learn to strengthen their neck muscles. Don't worry if they don't take to it straight away, as all babies are different. Maybe your baby just doesn't like being put down - how do they react if you place them on their back? Also, how ...


1

Same as normal, they’re not going to be injecting him on his back.


5

If you touch it and it hurts, you'll know. While it is not nice to see your baby hurt, you will not irreparably damage your child if you happen to touch a sore spot. They're probably going to bump into it several times themselves. The pain from trapped gas by avoiding burping might be worse, if your baby has a sensitive gut. Our baby is prone to painful gas ...


-1

Dont put it next to the crib. It is too noisy, and once I saw one the power supply of a PC starting to blow. Lots of smoke, plug was pulled, so not sure if a fire (inside the PSU) would have developed.


3

The fears of computer largely stem from CRT (cathode ray tube, the "bulky" kind) monitors from the past. They were fully replaced by LCDs (liquid crystal displays, the "flat" ones) in 2000-2010 and never appeared in mass-produced portable computers in the first place. CRT monitors did emit x-rays that are a known health issue. Bigger ...


9

"Radiation" is a very broad term. It includes things like visible light, or the infrared light emitted by your body. What is harmful is ionizing radiation. A computer does not emit ionizing radiation. There is ionizing background radiation present all the time in our environment at low levels. Re thermal effects, a computer puts out heat, but so ...


32

Working in the same room your son sleeps is more an issue of the sounds and light of your monitor you make while working rather than the electromagnetic radiation. If possible, it'd be good for nap times if you could work in a different location. If working in your bedroom is all you've got, try using a sound machine to mask the noises of you working. The ...


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