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5

The weekly variations in wake time within 1.5 hour range could be caused by a number of things (for some of which you may want to consult a pediatrician). One of the possible causes could be simple variations in nighttime or daytime routines. These you have control over. I assume from your question that the nighttime routine is fairly constant ("We get her ...


5

It is common for children to stop napping at around 3-4 years old. My 3.5 year old is almost like yours: doesn't nap for us most days, naps for daycare. He also sleeps pretty late - 10pm is common - and wakes up by 7am (we wake him up). He just doesn't sleep all that much. Is that okay? Sure. Is it optimal? Nope... but such is life. What we have had ...


4

Personally I don't think you should go back to napping if it's not really what he does. Weekday routines may not be conducive to naps and naturally he may be tired and cranky in the evenings. But depending on interaction and choice of activities this may work to your advantage. My kids would fall asleep in cars at very inconvenient times if I didn't engage ...


3

11-13 weeks is when a growth spurt may take place. 11-13 weeks is also the time when yet another wonder week may occur. The slightly-fussier period of a wonder week may last for a few weeks. The extremely-fussy, constantly sucking no-sleep growth spurt period usually lasts only 2 or 3 days. If you are really worried or seeing another worrysome symptom, ...


3

It could be a recurring nightmare, especially one that involves being trapped in a car seat or car. You might consider stopping and hugging her until she calms down, but not getting out of the car, when that's possible. If both parents are in the car, one could sit next to her so as to reassure her more immediately if she wakes up from a nap.


2

Our son was doing the exact same thing. We asked his pediatrician and she said that's fine for someone his age. Just make sure they get the recommended total amount of sleep, which is 10-13 hours (depending on the child.) We started putting him to bed earlier at night (730pm) and he's been doing better. (We were putting him to bed at 9 with a 75 minute nap.) ...


2

We use co sleep. It worked for us because child happy. Our mattress on floor with baby on pad beside mommy.


2

Not knowing the exact details of your exchange from a tone, body language, etc. perspective, I would have asked the grandma how I could of helped her or more likely, I would of just gotten the scale for her so that her immediate need is satisfied. Then if I thought that she felt disrespected at all, I would ask my wife to speak to her about her volume level ...


2

First things first: infants' sleep patterns change very often, with my daughter it was sometimes as often as every 2 weeks. Don't get too worried and to happy about how your child goes to sleep. It will change. There may be ups and downs, but, in general, it gets better with age. Waking 4 times at night seems a bit too much for a 5mo to me; have you tried ...


2

The biggest thing I spotted was the 2 naps https://www.littleones.co/blogs/our-blog/nap-transitions-how-and-when-your-baby-will-drop-their-naps Between 12-15 months your baby should then drop from 2 naps to just 1. Dropping down to one nap is slightly harder than 3 to 2 and the transition is also over a longer period. Some very alert babies or ...


2

I never could get the hang of them either - kids just have different needs and different schedules than us unfortunately. We tried putting them to bed earlier (massive failure, they just had difficult bedtimes), putting them to bed later (since we needed them up by 7 to go to daycare, this didn't work half the time either), more settled bedtime routines... ...


1

Poor quality sleep could be the immediate cause of this behavior. Has anything changed recently that may have affected sleep? Any recent changes in room temperature, noise, light? Any changes in the diet, such as lunch? Any changes in clothing (too itchy) or laundry detergent or fabric softener? Any new scary books or TV programs? Any recent other changes to ...


1

The good news is that waking up during the night is probably not doing her any harm as long as her total sleep amount is enough for her needs. My son is almost 3 and has never slept through the night, yet is meeting all his milestones handily. Many toddlers and young children experience night waking with no ill effects. Sweaty sleeping seems to be pretty ...


1

For me personally, my 2 yr daughter has sadly no longer been taking naps consistently any more since we've been in lockdown. What I've done is put less pressure on the scheduled naps, encourage quiet time (if possible, where they sit on their bed with a book) instead, and if she falls asleep sometime during the afternoon/morning then so be it... On days she ...


1

We have a similar situation and our toddler naps quickly with the blackout routine but he also falls asleep in the car on his own even when we aren’t expecting it. I’m not sure self-soothing in a ten month old is really a reasonable expectation. You may be able to stick it out until she is a little bit older and more able to learn gradually with Cry It Out ...


1

It's possible to gently and gradually adjust your child's sleep timing and habits, but it may take some time and effort. Also make sure this is truly what you want-- if you get him sleeping at an earlier time, he will probably also wake earlier, and your lie-ins may be a thing of the past. He currently stays in bed about 10.5-11.5 hours, and I don't think ...


1

I agree with the suggestion about dropping a nap. But also note you mention it seems to be around 2am regularly. This could be a body clock issue where their body is set to a 2am wake time because of a previous feed at that time or something disturbing them. You could try 'catching the clock', where instead of responding post wake you attend to your little ...


1

just a thought... If she's tired and crying when you place her down for a nap, can you try changing the time of her nap? A little earlier perhaps? Here's my thought process: little ones often reach the point of being inconsolable when they are "over tired" or "over stimulated". If you put her down for the nap a 10-20 minutes earlier, it might be easier for ...


1

The other option is they suck their thumb/fingers. You probably don't want to go there if you can help it. You can take away a pacifier, you can't take away their thumb. All my children were avid thumb suckers until school age, and I'd trade all the talks and gimmicks we tried to get them to stop, for the ability to have simply taken it away and dealt ...


1

Like you said, it's hard to find any hard science on this. It seems like there's considerable disagreement about pacifiers, and I'm not an expert. Having said that, my opinion is that you aren't crazy at all for wanting to wean the baby off the pacifier at the same time that you change the nap schedule. I haven't met any one that regretted weaning their ...


1

If she normally sleeps about 45 minutes, have a chair in the hallway outside his bedroom door and at about 15 minutes before she wakes up sit there and read a book or knit and wait and listen. The minute your little one starts to make any kind of sound like she's waking up, rush in there and pat her, rub her, rock her, do whatever you need to do to get her ...


1

At birth, baby sleep patterns aren’t the natural cycle of day and night. It can take several months before babies become fully adapted to the 24-hour day. (as your baby is 5.5 month old, so this is all normal) see This for everything about baby's sleep.


1

There are a few things I think you can do relatively soon that have very little risk. 1. Try a cradle swing. They're popular because they work. Most brands max out at about 10 kg, but it can at least get her back on track. 2. See a pediatrician. There are some common medical problems that can affect sleep. 3. Supplement with formula. She might still be ...


1

Kudos for having an established bedtime routine! I would add to that to be fully cognizant of his energy level leading up to and during his nap routine. I found with both my daughters they came down from a high energy state in steps not a continuous line. To help them I would first match their energy state then encourage them to come down a level by leading. ...


1

Do you want to housework? Well you could carry him on your back and then do the housework with him in there. Do you want to do some desk work? Well I this going to get harder and harder when they get older. My tactic was to carry the baby around till he was a sleep, then lie down with him in the carrier (open it).... Note our bed only consist of mattresses ...


1

Talk to the pre-K about it. Sometimes if they're aware of the issues they can change things on their end, like turning down the lights during nap time. However, there's a good chance they won't change, in which case you either have to move to a different pre-K or adjust your schedule, such as by giving him an earlier dinner and bedtime or getting him up ...


1

Your 3-year old sleeps 11-12 hours per day if I've interpreted your post correctly. Kids that age often don't need more than that, although 12-13 is more typical. This will make both bed- and nap time difficult. Also, children typically gets more tired from daycare than from being at home (both for positive and negative reasons. They usually get more ...


1

Simple answer: If the baby is not tired, they will not sleep! Give her some physical activities, hide and seek, race, trampoline, scooter, bicycle, and just a brisk walk outside with fresh air few minutes before sleep helps. Complicated answer: I'm not a professional, just another parent. So, don't expect one :)


1

It sounds like it might be time to try leaving the baby alone during "nap time". Get them into the routine with the rest of the children you care for. From my own personal experience, getting children into a routine is the best thing for them. Eventually the child will learn that at nap time you aren't going to comfort them. We did this with our daughter at ...


1

You say "no matter what has been tried". Maybe you're trying too many things. This kid might have out-smarted you (no offense) and knows you'll come back and try something else. Ideas: The kid needs to be up a bit longer. After the ride over there's been too much mental stimulation; he/she's not ready to return to sleep and trying to do it too soon ...


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