Hot answers tagged

131

Play all the music. See what he enjoys. Play that. I have some bad news. Your son is quite likely to love dumb bouncy pop stuff like "Let's Get Ready to Rumble" because he's two and it's all bouncy. Or he may go nuts for the theme tune to "Batman: Brave and the Bold" or "TMNT" because they're connected to the bright picture box. Or he may just really be ...


71

As rumtscho commented, how do you know the child has no talent? And how do you know they won't end up selling a million records? Take the Sex Pistols as an example - when they started they couldn't play or sing and sounded awful, but were incredibly enthusiastic and became stars. Everyone starts off sounding like they are strangling a cat, or destroying the ...


38

Let him listen to whatever he wants and let him BE whoever he wants to be. Just because you would like your son to listen to certain type of music or you would like him to be a musician doesn't mean you should pressure him and manipulate him into something he may not enjoy. Show him the ropes and have him listen to your favorite music, but arguing over it is ...


36

I wouldn't discourage following musical talent. Although he may never be good, it may be a good release when he needs to think. Thomas Jefferson was not amazing but often played the violin when he needed to think things through. We tend to gravitate toward things at which our personalities excel. You could always have him look at other things he may enjoy ...


31

The child is 9 years old. It isn't exactly urgent that you either squash his creative ambitions or support them at the expense of every other possibility. Why not just be supportive? I don't remember when I hit my stride, but it was well into adulthood, and even then, my parents still didn't really understand my style or what I was doing, and they would ...


28

The key to getting a reluctant practiser to practise anything (a musical instrument, reading, physical exercise, whatever) is to change from: Time for you to go practise X! to OK, time for us to do your X! I don't mean stand over him with a timer and glare to ensure he doesn't stop at 9 minutes 30 seconds. I mean you show your enthusiasm for the ...


22

From my personal experience, if you want your child to enjoy the things you do, make it fun and expose them to it regularly. My son is 4 now, but when he was younger I would sing to him every night while putting him to bed. It's probably been about a year since I've done this, our routine has changed, but earlier this week he asked me to sing to him like I ...


15

Your kids will get their own tastes in music no matter what you do, so it's an unproductive argument to have with a spouse. Do you listen to exactly what your parents played you? I highly doubt it. I certainly don't. My music tastes aren't 100% what I grew up listening to my Dad play. My 3 kids all early on developed their own tastes too. For example, I ...


14

Insisting, forcing him to do something will most likely not work in the long term. Yes, he may improve, but it'd be much much better if he wanted to improve. You should talk to your son, ask him whether he wants to learn to play well or not. If he doesn't - I think you shouldn't force him. I admit that he will eventually learn, but it'll cost him much and ...


13

Talent ≠ skill. While a talent is innate, a skill is learned and developed. Talent can definitely give you a jumpstart on the road to success, but it's only through developing skill that you'll ever achieve it. Remember that regardless of talent, everyone begins their journey with no skill.


12

Basically it's all marketing wearing a lab coat. Nothing in the research supports a 'Mozart effect'. The original research used to support the 'Mozart effect' is Music and spatial task performance (Rauscher et al.) which demonstrated a performance improvement:- lasting 10-15 minutes in adults for specific types of spatial-temporal tests general ...


12

With formal training and time (and maybe earplugs for you) everyone improves. My son played for many years with more enthusiasm about sharing the experience of creating music than putting in the time to be very good. His music teacher gave him an award for being "most enthusiastic" student because it was clear to all he really enjoyed it. He moved on from ...


12

Not sure this is the answer you want to hear. I learned to not hear those toys along with zoning out repetitive kids sounds that meant everything was fine. It took time. I have also used other songs to stop the 'earworms' from repeating over and over. So if you can't get "This Little Light of Mine" out of your head, try singing "Row, Row, Row your Boat" or a ...


11

Without exception, every adult I know who took piano as a kid but no longer plays, including some who were quite talented, had it turned into a chore by their parents. It is absolutely essential to find a way to keep it fun. So I would make your busiest days fun days, where you still expect him to play, but let him play whatever he wants. It might ...


11

I agree with the rest of the answers here, largely, in that you should remember your son is a separate person, and should not go into this thinking he's going to do what you want him to do with his life. But, that said, if your aim is for him to be a musician - you should want to give him as broad a musical experience as possible, especially at this age. ...


10

As an adult who does the same thing, I don't think it's anything to worry about. If they aren't already involved in playing a musical instrument or some type of singing outlet you could find a local option to help them get the music out. I know in my case it's that I really love music and find myself thinking about songs I enjoy or sometimes am noodling a ...


10

I would get him to play more on days when he is does not have sport or late finishes, and get him just to do a couple of scales or something on days when he has more on. As he starts playing for longer he'll also start enjoying it more as he'll start becoming more creative.


10

Be glad your kid is enthusiastic about something which does not involve a computer monitor and beeping! I suffered greatly when my son learned drums, but it broke my heart when he gave everything up for World of Brainless Beepcraft. It is useful for any child to learn the discipline and self-discipline of music. The wonder of knowing how the dots turn into ...


10

Warning: Some of this post is going to come across as a little harsh, but everything I say, I say because I want to help. Anything that I say bluntly, I say it that way because I think that hearing it the most straightforward way possible is the best way I can help. Let's get some perspective here. You married a woman who doesn't share your taste in music ...


10

Embrace it or, in the words of a song you will soon know if you don't already... ♫ let it go, let it go ♫ Don't try to unhear or get the song out of your head. Instead, accept the fact that it is stuck there and be OK with that. It's a reminder of your daughter that you will carry with you forever, and is an experience shared by most parents. It's not ...


8

Any music you enjoy listening to, that you plan to play after the baby is born would be appropriate. Human voices are best for learning speech processing. Newborns can recognize the voices of people whom they heard speaking before birth. Normal sounds, including mother's heart beat, walking, and parents' voices are appropriate for development. Some would ...


8

As another answerer already mentioned of course, decibel level is of concern - you don't want your kids listening to music that is so loud, you will actually hurt their hearing. Outside of that, as shared by this poster some studies on music and toddlers have shown that there can be some impact on intelligence, while still others seem to indicate that is a ...


8

What kind of practice are you trying? One of the key components of techniques like the Suzuki method is to have one parent sit down with the child during practice sessions. The point is that the child will want to do it if the parent shows some interest in the child's activity. If you just tell then to practice, turn on an egg timer, and then walk away (...


8

I didn't really develop any music tastes until I was at least 16, and even then it was mostly things that were related to things I liked (video games, internet culture, ect). Your son is two years old, and the fact that he has any music taste at all is remarkable. People change over time - what your son likes today may drastically change as he grows ...


7

Even some of the MCs known for their notorious lyrics don't feel that they are suitable for children's ears. To quote Willie D of the Ghetto Boys (censored a bit): Interviewer: Well that’s strange to hear coming from the guy who wrote “Let a Hoe Be a Hoe.” Those songs were extremely explicit and you’re worried about the late night porn on the TV? ...


7

Yes, it's okay. If it's any consolation, the subject matter doesn't register with your daughter -- yet! But this will soon change, so you're right to address it ahead of that time. Becoming parents means learning how to raise a well-rounded kid, but it also means learning which of your old habits to let go of -- at least for a couple of years. There are ...


7

My 7 year old was recently diagnosed with ADD and this was actually a question on his assessment and yes, he hums all the time! He has done this since he could talk and honestly, it drives me up the wall but according to his psychiatrist, it is a way for kids with ADD to keep themselves "busy" and they really do not even realize they are doing it.


7

I am the OP. I eventually used a bribe. One M&M lentil (or skittle) per song (page). In the first 4 months it worked. Later my child stopped requiring the reward and now can practice without the reward and loves the piano. So initial struggle was not worth it. You can bribe and fade it away later.


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