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14

TL; DR: We've been through the same thing, and we tried to explain to my daughter what was going to happen ahead of time, without hiding anything. Overall, it was a painless process, and after a month in the new flat, she seems to have adapted to her new environment. We went through exactly the same situation a few months ago with my 2.5 year old daughter. ...


8

Both are valid options, but reading your post carefully I'd suggest finishing the school year at the old school. A list of pro's (in somewhat random order): Finishing at his old school should give him some sense of closure - this phase ends for all the current kids next summer. So I can understand that he doesn't want to leave prematurely but (perhaps ...


5

Moving to a new house and changing the daycare are big changes, a new bed is a small change. Potty training can be either, as is so often the case, it depends... I see three separate issues here: Can you separate the daycare switch from the moving? If you can, you definitely should consider making them two distinct events, IMO Moving means a new room and ...


5

Wanting to move for better living conditions isn't a bad thing in and of itself. It does show a concern for the well-being of your family. However, better living conditions alone may not be a sufficient reason to move. Moving sucks. Nobody likes it. If you are going to move, you need to make a compelling case as to why it is worth going through the pain ...


4

I was in the same situation as yourself. One daughter finishing grade 6 before moving to middle school, the other in grade four. The move was occasioned by a messy divorce and financial downsizing, so everyone was rattled. I kept the girls at the old school to finish the year, so there would be some continuity. The following year, the older went to middle ...


4

I would look at whatever reduces everyone's stress the most. Being around 3 year olds, my experience is, they don't seem to be bothered if they cannot verbally communicate much with other children. They play with nonverbal children just fine, they play with kids with other languages fine. I think they are still young enough that they still recall how to ...


4

Moving away would only help your son if the thing that is causing him to neglect school and smoke weed instead is related to your current location. But there's a good chance that his location is not why he is showing this behavior. Have you talked (and I mean really talked) about what is causing this behavior? Remember that people don't start with drugs to ...


3

We did this some years ago. As far as our son was concerned it was all an excellent adventure. He was too young to be sad about losing friends, and the airplane and airport were exciting and interesting. If you are flying then read the fine print on luggage allowances carefully. We were able to bring a full size suitcase and hand baggage as "his" luggage, ...


3

Will you be 18 when you are planning to move out? As dumb as it sounds, this actually does matter. Most contracts are harder to sign as a minor (even one that is a high school graduate), and having a job that allows you to work enough hours to pay for a place to live, transportation, food, etc. are hard to come by if you're not 18 yet (I learned this all ...


3

What steps can I take to help her make new friends once we move? Try to register her at a sports club and/or music school (something like that).This helps deflecting the old friends (as a 6 year) and then she should find new friends (mostly) at her age, very soon...


3

Doing everything at once gets it over with in one go, but at the risk that it won't go very well. I would changing one element at a time. Toddlers are a bit like people with autism; they like fixed patterns and repetition, any change can be upsetting. Especially when you're facing big changes, tread lightly. I can't really say "do one change every two ...


3

Babies have been doing this since the beginning of time. They are flexible little beings, and any discomfort will likely be minor and short-lived. But if you are concerned, keep a burp cloth (cloth diaper or nappy) over your shoulder whenever you hold him. It protects your clothes as well!!


3

I second the other answers suggestion of looking for expats. A few notes: Your kids will forget a second (even first language) if it is not reinforced. They learn language (and other behaviours) to talk to their peers even more than their parents. This means that there is very little you can do directly but also that you can be very effective by ...


3

We moved with 3 kids age 0.5, 2.5 & 3.5 to a different country and it was no problem whatsoever. We were lucky enough to find a pre-school that was specifically designed for non-native speakers and worked quite well. Within 6 month or so the two older ones could communicate effortlessly and within a year there were indistinguishable from native speakers. ...


3

The way I see it, it's a band-aid problem regarding the amount of stress the child will be under. Do you rip the band-aid off, or take it off bit by bit? The concern I'd have with keeping the child at home then starting daycare is that it gives the child time to see home as their safe place after a strange and tumultuous move. While not a bad thing in and ...


2

I agree with Matthew...integrate the German into her life as much as you can. Once you get settled, then perhaps you can find a part-time daycare-type situation that will expose her to native speakers. Here in the US, we have mothers-day-out programs in a lot of areas which are only a couple of days a week in most cases for maybe 4 hours each day. The ...


2

Another option is online communities. There are many parental/school-related local communities on FaceBook/G+ etc... (I know our locality - which is a small town - has a couple, some very specifically centered around specific shared-value communities). You can try searching community names for "locale+school" or "locale+parents" or "locale+families" Find ...


2

I think you will find the month by month outline on American Pregnancy Helpful because it goes over the major developments you can expect in a very clear and precise way for the first year. The list includes motor skills as well as others (such as social) but since the most noticeable and "measured" developments that occur during the first year are ...


2

I live in Georgia right now. We've been here for about 1 year. The native language is Georgian and most people (adults at least) also speak Russian. Our youngest child (age 2) understands as much Russian and Georgian as she does English (mostly due to baby sitters and playgroups), and she hasn't taken classes in any language. I've been studying Georgian for ...


2

General advice: At 18, I had life figured out. At 36, I realize I was just beginning to learn. You describe your parents as dissapointed in you, that may be true. But that doesn't mean that they don't love you. With time and communication, no difference is irreconcilable. if I stay at home, I will still be treated like a child That is true. You will ...


2

I moved out on my 18th birthday because my parents would give me no room to make mistakes. So I had to work full time in order to go to university part time. It took me nearly 20 years to pay it all back, but I was happy and independent. That said, if I had simply waited one year, they would have paid for everything and might even have contributed to me ...


2

My report is similar to user20744's answer. We moved from spanish-speaking Argentina to english-speaking Canada when our daughters were 3.9 and 1.7 years old. While in Canada, we moved three times in the first 5 months. Completely painless to them, even with the 24+ hour trip and the inability to communicate with other kids for the first few months until ...


2

Both options seem equally good from your description. Have you considered other downsides of the move, such as trying to make friends there? At middle school there will be lots of other kids trying to make friends, but a year before the end of this school may be difficult to become part of established groups. There is no right answer, at the end of the day ...


2

First of all, I love the fact that I get to tell one of the forum mods "YOR DOIN IT RONG!!!11" IMO wait till the move. If it's planned and it's in the pretty near future (couple months), there's no reason not to wait. Every routine you have is going to be restarted anyway, and you'll even have to start some new ones. Regardless of how you try to plan it, ...


2

As @Becuzz states, you need to present a compelling argument to get your wife on board. The most common method to do this is to list the pros and cons of making a move. Are you unhappy in your current location or merely irritated? If you're genuinely unhappy, a move would be a pro. Does your wife have a job at present? Does she love it? Will you be moving ...


2

A few things: 1) 8 is old enough to be able to think about and weigh-in on this decision. I think it would be a good idea to talk to your 8-year-old stepson to see what he thinks of the idea and how often he would want to fly back to the states. You don’t have to base your decision on anything he says, but that is probably the best way to assess how he will ...


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