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37

In my experience, people see what they want to see in movies. For example, there was a brouhaha about Frozen promoting a gay agenda. If you actually examine the plots, the messages of princess movies are overwhelmingly that wealth and good looks are not enough. Snow White and the witch were both very beautiful, but one was vain and one was modest and kind....


36

I agree that there may be an issue here - ie, some Disney movies perpetuate gender stereotypes, gender roles, and other things that aren't good things to perpetuate. However, I feel like this is similar to the censorship debate, in that simply not letting your kid watch them is not the right answer. Your kid will be exposed to similar issues whether or not ...


29

Kids, just like adults, want to "be cool", to have fun and to have something they can share with their friends. TV, video games, pro wrestling, whatever. And the parts they want to talk about/reenact are going to be the ones that they find most fun or exciting. Think back to the last action movie you saw (for me it was probably Avengers or something ...


15

Violence and play fighting is an innate aspect of human behaviour. You can observe animals play fighting as well. Domestically, you can observe cats and dogs play fight, more commonly as juveniles. Our closest animal relative, chimps, are also known to wrestle and play chase. I don't believe the desire to play fight is mimicked from television (what ...


11

This is a good age to start an ongoing discussion of death. If you're fearful of doing so, she will pick up on the negative emotions (aside from bereavement) surrounding the topic, which would be unfortunate. The desire to protect a child from the subject is understandable, though. Children begin to understand death around 4 years of age, but have a lot of ...


10

It really depends entirely on the child. As for: what to do if they are bored after 5 minutes Leave. Be prepared to NOT make it through the entire film and be OK leaving early if need be. That takes a lot of stress out of the whole process.


8

Why is kids picking up on 'inappropriate behavior' appropriate? "The social group basically polices itself and enforces the rules of social dominance, the social mores of the troupe, and monkeys who don't pay attention to those rules -who are overly aggressive in their interactions- don't last in that troupe very long. They're kicked out of the troupe. They ...


7

While you should definitely vet the content of movies you let your child watch, Disney movies are perhaps the least problematic in this regard. Let's look at a few Disney movies with these Princess characters. I'm going to limit it to the previous century to avoid an incredibly unweildy list problem. Snow White Here right off the bat we do have a ...


6

I have to share this story. I had my six year old niece over for an afternoon, and I decided to show her Bambi, which she had never seen. At one point, I went into the kitchen to fetch a snack, and when I came back out Bambi and the old stag were having their "you must be brave and learn to live by yourself" conversation. My niece looked up at me and ...


5

My gut feeling: three mechanisms combined. Monkey see, monkey do Children learn via observation. A lot. If this weren't true, we could never teach by example and have to explain in detail whatever we want them to do. This is true for the rules of interactive play as well. In your question you mention TV action heroes, but there are hundreds of little (...


5

Hopefully you have some kind of relationship, or at least an open line of communication with the friend's parents, since you let your son spend the night there. I would have a brief conversation with them about this, along the lines of: Zach had a great time at your house, thanks for letting him stay over! We did have one concern, we know he watched an ...


4

I asked him if it scared him and he answered "Not really," but I have a hard time believing this. (This is coming from a kid who's still scared of Harry Potter.) How do I talk to him about it? Looking at the preview, I'd have a hard time believing he wasn't scared by the film, either. It might be that his friend was unafraid, even laughing, which made it ...


4

Sounds like you need to take this up with the friend's family. Since your son isn't showing any adverse effects from the movie (like talking about monsters or people dying), I'd be glad that he wasn't adversely affected, but angry at the parents nonetheless. From the things you mentioned it sounds like they don't have the same standards of parenting as you ...


4

The American Academy of Pediatrician's policy statement addresses this very issue. You can read it in full here. In fact, 2 studies have found that watching a program such as “Sesame Street” has a negative effect on language for children younger than 2 years, and 2 studies have found no evidence of benefit....Children 12 to 18 months of age ...


4

My kids all did fine from about the age of 3. The only real way to know which movie to pick is by seeing what they like at home. My kids all have wildly different taste in movies, so usually I take them one at a time. Sometimes they get bored during exposition, but just require a quiet reminder from me. You can't really judge it by how much they sit ...


4

I think the fundamental assumption of this question is wrong, the examples given are not violent behaviour, just physical emulation. Violence is defined as: Behaviour involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something. After watching Wreck It Ralph, my son (who was under 2 at the time) also starting tapping everything with ...


3

Because Humans have evolved to survive in a violent and dangerous environment Why do baby lions fight each other? They're practicing. They need to get good at fighting or when they are older they will die. Humans are the apex predator on this planet. We fight, we kill each other, we kill other animals in very large quantities, sometimes just for sport. It'...


2

I saw Fantasia at around 4 or 5. Can't remember that exact age, but I still remember seeing it. If all you're looking for is that your child "sits quietly", my kids sat quietly through a movie at 2 and 3. if you want a "take home" value I think 4 or 5 is a good age.


2

This varies so much from child to child I'm not sure their is a useful answer other than just to try them. In a worst case you will have wasted a few pounds/dollars/euro etc and have to leave early. My eldest enjoyed films from about 4, but my middle daughter was not a fan until she was about 6. I remember taking her about her fifth birthday and she ...


2

Girls may identify with the female princess characters and may adopt some of the ideals associated with them. I find some of the problem is when adults indulge them in the fantasy of them being a princess (and expecting to be given gifts and etc). I think it will be inevitable that children will watch them, but important to also let them see movies that ...


2

Lets assume cartoon do stimulate unwanted behavior. As a child I saw Tarzan almost naked, Cinderella arrived home after midnight, Pinocchio told lies, Aladdin was a thief, Batman drove over 200 miles an hour, Snow White lived in a house with 7 men, Popeye smoked a pipe and had tattoos, Pac Man ran around to digital music while eating pills that enhanced ...


2

I think you are overestimating the "confusion" that will occur. My guess is that if you don't bring it up with concern, she won't either. But if it's an issue at all, try: "Movies are really complicated and take a long time to make. Especially movies like Star Wars, where the special effects are only done after the actors have already finished filming their ...


2

Adults over complicate things. Its a non-issue unless you make it one. My son is the same age. His early pets were a jumping spider (life expectancy 2 years) and a praying mantis (life expectancy 6 months), so he is familiar with death. He still grieves for the critters, but wisely selected a cat for his current pet. My family is involved in video ...


1

A 7 year old can easily understand this kind of concept. You can simply tell her that the film has already been made, before the actor died. I don't see why this would cause any confusion. Having said that, if you think your child is too young to even understand a concept like death, are you sure she is old enough to be watching Star Wars films?


1

I was introduced to death at the very early age of 5 with the death of my grandfather. I barely knew him because of my immature age, yet I was aware of the great commotion surrounding his death. I distinctly remember the night my parents went to his funeral as I peered out the front door as they drove away. It was a cold, northern, winter night. About 2 or ...


1

Not necessarily backed by anything other than assumption and observation (yeah, good job keeping it scientific on SE) but I really like the idea that it's because violence is a form of agency. Children aren't allowed to control many parts of their life. A lot of the time, they don't even know what that would entail. But being violent, or forcing your ...


1

Older films may be problematic, newer ones are better. There has been an interesting shift in the portrayal of love and male-female relations in Disney movies over the years. Earlier films portrayed star-crossed lovers, a beautiful helpless princess rescued by a dashing prince, their love somehow predestined. You might show these films, but you will need ...


1

What age can you expect a child to happily sit through a movie It depends on how much media consumption they've been trained to handle. My 3½ year old watches about five minutes of TV per day, just one episode of Barbapapa before bed. He wouldn't last long in a cinema. On the other hand, some pre-schoolers spend between one and three hours per day in front ...


1

I actually watch the movie first, or read the preview of the story, so I will get an idea whether it is appropriate for my child or not. I have to screen it first, so I would know if my son will get good values out of it. Sometimes, I also ask for recommendations coming from a friend or relative who already watched the movie. I also watch with my 1 year ...


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