44

This weird stage is really common, and mostly developmental-- something that most babies will naturally outgrow. It's upsetting and gross, but not harmful. The baby won't actually choke or cause injury by occasionally over inserting fingers in the mouth. My son did it for a couple weeks at about that age, and it's recently had a brief resurgence (age 2)....


12

People haven't been aware of germs until only recently (what's a 100 years in the entire history of human race?). With all the medicine available to cure most common sicknesses you should encourage your child to familiarize its immune system with common bacteria. The general idea behind this approach is related to the Hygiene hypothesis (lots of information ...


11

Infants discover the world largely by their mouth. They put virtually everything in mouth, and whatever they can't fit there, they suck or lick. Fists are convenient. They are always close, they are large enough to fill the entire mouth, they are warm... And it's funny that when she puts them in her mouth, she feels something else, a tickling of sorts, on a ...


11

Glass marbles are not poisonous, but: They are often painted, and the paints can have unwanted chemicals (such as lead). They can get lodged/stuck in digestive tract (less likely) or respiratory tract (more likely), that can lead to lot more complex problems. Also, as mentioned, can be choking hazard.


10

One of my nephews used to do that, more because he loved the way everybody paid attention to him when he did it than because he thought it was fun to choke himself :( Distraction was the key to eliminating the behavior. Teach him that he can get attention with other behaviors. Putting something interesting in his hands will give him something else to ...


9

Babies usually explore the world with their eyes first, then their mouths. Depriving them of this highly motivated behavior seems unwise at best and possibly harmful, though the latter is strictly my opinion. What should and shouldn't be allowed to go into the mouth is highly dependent on size (not small enough to choke on), material (I wouldn't let my baby ...


8

As long as they are ordinary glass marbles they are not poisonous, though as Erik mentions they are choking hazards so it's worth teaching your son not to leave them around - or perhaps supervising him more closely if he's not old enough to learn that. Avoid giving your son any small magnetic toys since those can connect in the gut and cause major problems. ...


8

Marbles are not poisonous (anything that's made for kids to play with is generally required to be made of safe material) but marbles are a choking hazard, so I would strongly suggest you make sure your baby doesn't swallow any more.


6

To directly answer your question, here are some statistics. This childproofing checklist seems about right to me in terms of age. 3-5yo are old enough to usually not swallow things inappropriately, depending on the child, but not to always behave in that regard. So I'd set a minimum age target of 5; and I'd point out that children develop differently, so ...


5

I would suggest that this is dependent on the item your child is trying to "eat" My daughter is also of an age where everything goes into her mouth, but this is partly a child's way of exploring and learning about the world. Shes put toy's, an Xbox controller and even the dogs ear in her mouth at one point or another so the act of putting something into ...


3

No, it is not okay for your child to eat marbles because yes, they can be harmful to her health. Assuming the marbles are made of glass, they are, by nature, nontoxic. However, if they are painted or made out of any other material, they could potentially contain contaminants from the paint or material that would be hazardous to her health. The risks of un-...


3

The choking hazard is very, very serious. If your older son with the marbles can't alter his behavior and not leave marbles about, you need to take them away from him until the baby is old enough to not eat them, or he is old enough to be more diligent.


3

It's not ok. She could choke. Take away all the marbles until the baby is old enough not to eat them. And for that matter, hunt for other things that could be dangerous, like small lego pieces, and keep them high out of reach and clean up thoroughly after they've been played with. Really not worth the risk. Unfortunate for your son that he doesn't get to ...


2

She's not quite three and still exploring her environment; this is part of that. If it really bothers you, you can gently remove her hand when you catch her with her hand in her mouth, but I wouldn't fret too much. Most kids won't continue this for very long (for example, my nearly 3-yr-old son just got out of this stage about 3-4 weeks ago). If it ...


2

It's the Smallest Things... I can't think of anything that has changed in his life that would make him start doing this. Sometimes it's the craziest things and you wouldn't think of them at all. Try to talk it through with people who have another perspective. A Quick Anecdote I have a family relative who at something like 4 to 6 years old suddenly was ...


2

This question has been open for awhile, but I just stumbled upon it, so who knows, your three year old might be over it already and someone else might find it helpful. I have seen this before in several children, and it could be a coping mechanism to anxiety (that sometimes becomes a reflex and is no longer tied to the original anxiety producing stimulus). ...


2

According to this article from healthychildren.org (an American Academy of Pediatricians site): Around 3 months of age, babies will begin exploring the world with their mouth and have increased saliva and start to put their hands in their mouth. Many parents question whether or not this means that their baby is teething, but a first tooth usually appears ...


2

At four, not only is a child capable of saying they have a toothache, but they are also able to understand your concerns. I could provide some behaviour techniques, if that is what you want, but first try sitting him down and asking him: Does he understand why is could be dangerous? Can he explain why he is doing it? Can he stop doing it before you 'help' ...


1

Maybe not related, but our kid was heavy drooler around 1-2 years old. They told us if this continued we should start doing exercises like: making your kid drink through a straw (teaches the kid to breath more through nose which then reduces drooling). where is some more information: http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/ConditionsandDiseases/...


1

Babies often bite on everything within reach. Toys are usually within reach, it's kind of part of the definition of being a toy. Baby toys are safe to suck on because that's what they are being used for, and the people selling them will get sued if their products harm their users. However, it's good practice to wash and possibly boil baby toys after ...


1

You can get bitter-tasting stuff that is intended for putting on nails to stop nail biting. You could put some on the marbles. After she has tried one or two she will probably stop.


1

Personally, I'd advice you to discourage this habit when it starts. It's normal for infants to put hands in their mouth, complete natural behaviour. But in long run, this can become a problem when you want them to grow out of this habit. With my daughter, I discouraged this by putting mittens on her hands and actively plucking her hands out if I find her ...


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