21

I can't think of any risk in this normal behavior (yes, this qualifies as normal) in a normal baby (contrast this to children who engage in abnormal activity, e.g. head-banging, who are putting themselves at risk). If anything, your grandson is showing good strength in his legs, good balance (he's not falling over with movement), and good large-motor ...


16

That's absolutely fine - in fact it helps him to develop. How can I help my child to stand? Your child can be held supported in a standing position from an early age This allows the child to experience the feeling of their body weight through their feet. They may bounce up and down. They do this to develop the strength in their ...


8

No, there is no health risk. Your grandson is actually doing something healthy — building his leg muscles to be able to stand more easily, and to raise and lower himself in a more controlled, coordinated way. Sounds like he'll be walking in the next few months!


7

There are seats you can get for babies to bounce in, which my daughter loved, but her orthopedic doctor said not to use for risk of hip problems. However, that was an external device for a child who already had a high enough risk of hip problems that she had an orthopedic doctor. My guess is the person who told you had heard similar advice, perhaps ...


7

This is perfectly normal and you shouldn't try to prevent it. He will soon learn how to roll over on his back again. If you are worried about him doing it in the middle of the night then I would recommend taking out all of the blankets and pillows from his crib. In fact, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics babies shouldn't sleep with blankets ...


6

That's very common. The recommendation is to still put them on their back to sleep, but anything they do under their own power is okay. It's actually when parents try to prevent this that babies get into trouble. Don't try to put pillows or toys or blankets as barriers to rolling over. It probably won't be long until he can roll both ways. In the mean ...


6

Years ago I discussed this with someone who was doing neurological research around handedness. She told me they have all these categories for people: right handed for everything, left handed for everything, ambidextrous, right-handed left-footed, different hands for different tasks, and so on, but what her research showed time and again was there were really ...


6

As I preschool teacher I had a couple of students that it was not clear at the beginning of their year as two-year-olds but who were decidedly "handed" by the time they were three. However, most of my kids had established "handedness" before arriving in the "two's" classroom. My guess is that for most it happens sometime in the latter half of the second ...


5

Nelson, E. A., Yu, L. , Wong, D. , Wong, H. and Yim, L. (2004), Rolling over in infants: age, ethnicity, and cultural differences. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 46: 706-709. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8749.2004.tb00985.x This is the page and here's the pdf view. ‘Roll over’ in the Denver Developmental Screening Test (Frankenburg et al. 1981, 1992) ...


4

I know it's hard to have your daughter pitching a fit at tummy time, and all you want is to keep her happy and let her learn, but let her fuss. The frustration of tummy time actually encouraged both of mine to start crawling. Think of it this way; by having her do tummy time, even if she's not a fan, you're encouraging her to find a way to either make it ...


4

As someone else has said above, if it was painful for him to do this he would stop. I believe any movement they are making is only helping to strengthen their muscles so that there is less risk of joint problems when they are older. Stronger muscles will help to support joints. My daughter loved to bounce when she was younger (less than 1 year old), she ...


4

See this article: http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/handedness.aspx Infancy In his pioneering work on child behavior, the American developmental psychologist Arnold Gesell claimed that infants as young as four weeks display signs of handedness and that right-handedness is clearly established by age one. However, it was as of 2004 commonly believed that ...


3

I would try to get him interested in activities that improve his core muscles. Swimming would be my first approach. That way you can help him to fix his posture indirectly.


3

When they can grasp them is the short answer. There are various stages of play but as a first starting point as soon as they have the coordination to pick them up one by one to begin exploring colour, shape texture and (of course) taste! Creating structures requires the ability to do imaginative play and is a considerably later developmental stage so I ...


3

Early intervention from speech-language therapists, occupational therapists, and physical therapists, can be very, very helpful. Are these available where you live? A good place to find out would be by talking with a doctor or nurse. I think you are doing the right thing by questioning whether his development is everything it could be. Reading between ...


3

Yes, No, Both, and Debatable are all valid answers to the question. I suggest reading the Wikipedia article about handedness. It goes through several different theories about what the primary reason for handedness is, and links several pieces of research for those theories. Whether handedness is genetic or not is debated and there isn't (as far as I know) ...


3

It shouldn't be necessary. To encourage babies to reach, you move or wiggle the object you want them to reach for. At 11 weeks old, they may not want to reach at all, and just watching bright colours and shapes is ample stimulation, but you could try bringing objects really close, even touching the baby's cheek and see how they respond - either trying to ...


2

I have tried a few times to help my LO do something, like bang toys or move something from one hand to another. She never learned from that, she got to do those things on her own some time later. I think that unless the child is willing to repeat what you are doing just by seeing it, it makes little sense to show her how to do it with her own limbs. She ...


2

Crawling is a motor development skill that develops naturally on each child's own developmental time table. Barring any severe physical or neurological disabilities, there is no need whatsoever to "teach" or "encourage" a child to crawl. Other than giving them ample safe space in which to explore, respect their stage of development (whatever that is), and ...


2

One of the hardest things for me to learn when my son was your daughter's age was "be less helpful." He didn't have too much need to crawl because he'd reach for things outside his grasp and we'd get them for him. That said, he simply was not much of a crawler, ever. He was pulling himself up on things and traveling before average but didn't "army crawl." ...


2

Tummy time is not explicitly 'learn to crawl' time. It is a combination of several things. Building strength and balance Increasing activity Getting the baby used to different positions Usually is more active than back-time Improve head shape (avoiding 'flat head') Certainly give her toys during this period. Don't push crawling very hard; she'll do it ...


2

encouraging it through indirect interest such as yoga and ballet is a good start, but like everything you have to also show the example.


2

It sounds like she's having cramps, causing her to tense up and "overstretch" (Not sure that's the correct word in English). She has no good muscle control yet, so she's tensing all of her muscles. Those in the back and neck win out, causing her to curve backwards somewhat like that pose in the linked picture. She will feel very rigid to you at that moment. ...


2

Our pediatrician told us that you can often tell which hand a baby will prefer by watching which hand it brings to its mouth most often, especially for a self-soothing effect. She even claims that if you watch a baby in utero long enough, you can observe the same phenomenon before some babies are born. I don't have any scientific proof, but it has held true ...


1

On top of the Yoga and Ballet idea from @JOduMonT getting your son to play as though he is a soldier and doing parade drills could help. Marching around with him, with shoulders back and chest out, pointing out that soldiers always stand straight will encourage him to mimic that. The more he practices standing straight, the muscles in the back and shoulders ...


1

Another anecdote. I have fraternal twin boys. They were ambidextrous through the first year or so. I had a suspicion that one was left-handed, but he wasn't reliably left-handed. Going into year 3, one is reliably right-handed. The other one tends to left-handedness but will happily eat, brush his teeth, or draw using either hand. So I'm still not sure which ...


1

It really depends on exposure and interest. I buy a lot of building toys because I feel they are really great for imaginative play. I did not start with wooden blocks because I wasn't sure if she would be chucking it at me. We have wooden blocks (passed down from my husband's grandmother who was really into architecture) but I think they must be for adults, ...


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