15

Here, in Germany, kids begin to learn to write letters in the first form of elementary school, which children can enter no earlier than at age 6, and quite a few kids start school when they are 7. There really is no concerted effort to teach children to write earlier than that. Nevertheless German adults can read and write as well as adults from other ...


10

There are different ideas of "counting" Memorizing 10 words in a row. If they started to speak early and practice a lot, they can manage it when they are about two years old. Being able to count the number of items/fingers etc. My daughter and her friends started doing this correctly when they were four years old.


10

My seven year-old only differentiates time out to about a week. He understands longer time intervals, but just doesn't care. To him, if it's not until next week, it may as well be next year. My four year-old often still says "tomorrow" when she means "sometime in the future." However, if I press her, she will admit she didn't mean tomorrow tomorrow, she ...


9

Most studies I've found indicates that toddlers will realize that the cute little person in the mirror is them around months 16 - 18, give or take. Free cites: “So Big”: The Development of Body Self-awareness in Toddlers Your Clever Toddler in Week 85: Mirror Recognition Self-Recognition — When Toddlers Know Who That Kid in the Mirror Is Scholarly cites (...


8

According to the US Department of Education, your son is of the age when children typically become interested in writing (or pretending to write) the letters of their language. The American Academy of Pediatrics doesn't mention the child's interest in learning letters until the age of four. So you can see there is room for individuality. It has been shown ...


8

My daughter has developmental delays (well, more like outright stopping now) due to her cerebral palsy. Pediatricians tend to be much more relaxed than parents on the issue of developmental delays. They field several questions from overly worried mothers every day, that almost always turn out to be nothing. The kind of delays you're talking about are ...


7

I don't have any real 'evidence' for this, but my nephew used to do the same thing. When he was being potty trained, he would go hide in a corner and poop his pants instead of in the toilet, which baffled us completely. He used to hide when wearing a diaper too. One day though, he walked in on his grandma in the bathroom and asked what she was doing, so she ...


6

Unasked-for advice is tricky. No one can see what you see and know the parents like you do. If you really believe the twins are delayed developmentally, I personally feel it's not only ok but ethically responsible to approach the parents, but not with just your dis-ease about the situation. I would suggest that you start by doing some solid research. Find ...


6

21 months is pretty spot on, or even a bit earlier than a lot of the kids I've seen. You don't mention how consistent she is about it (gets them in the correct order every time, doesn't skip numbers), but if she is not only able to count to 10 but not mix them up or skip some, then I think that is great! Here is a nice article detailing how a child moves ...


6

I decided to throw this answer in here for completeness, to be a little more general. It depends. My first was 4 weeks early, and we calculated based on his actual birthday. This was based on advice from our pediatrician. (and he did, and he caught up on height/weight by 6 months) However, 4 weeks is not that early (given that in the US, 3 weeks early ...


5

Nelson, E. A., Yu, L. , Wong, D. , Wong, H. and Yim, L. (2004), Rolling over in infants: age, ethnicity, and cultural differences. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 46: 706-709. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8749.2004.tb00985.x This is the page and here's the pdf view. ‘Roll over’ in the Denver Developmental Screening Test (Frankenburg et al. 1981, 1992) ...


5

From what I've read and from personal experience, I would say that you have nothing to worry about just because your son cannot walk at 13 months. According to these websites, it's normal for babies to start walking any time between 9 and 18 months: http://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/first-steps/ http://www.babycenter.com/0_baby-milestone-...


4

There can't be such thing as a "typical age" for this milestone (I mean, more precise than "about 2 years old"). Keep in mind that toddler's vocabulary is quite limited : mean [Language Development Survey] vocabulary scores at 24 months have been between 175 and 195 words, with standard deviations in the range of 70 to 80 (Klee et al., 1998; Rescorla &...


3

Mine was a month early too, and her pediatrician seems to expect her to hit things based on her birthdate, but said not to worry if she was late. For instance, she wasn't social smiling at 6 weeks, but was at 10 weeks. My sleep book (Weissbluth) says to expect babies to develop sleepwise based on due date, not birthdate.


3

This is within expectations for a healthy baby. Some do it this early, some don't. In general most developmental milestones have a wide range of expected times, and as long as they are roughly within this all is expected to be fine.


3

My daughter didn't start crawling until her 1st birthday. She was walking when she was 18 months, and now at 2 she runs and climbs all over. She was also an early imitator/talker and says sentences now. I think she didn't crawl until she was 1 because she was an only child and we gave her anything. She needed motivation to make the effort.


2

Of my three children, each started walking at a different age. The youngest did not walk on his own until nearly 14 months -- he was very cautious about his balance, and apparently did not want to risk falling over. The middle one started walking around 12 months, and the oldest was walking at 13 months. Children meet developmental milestones at different ...


2

It's different in different countries. Which country are you referring to, or do you want a general answer? I live outside the U.S, so where I am children are encouraged to learn alphabet recognition at about age 4, and it continues through to 5&6 yo. Usually they start learning to recognise the alphabet at about age 4-5 and practice "writing" their ...


2

Mostly, I think you'll find that he will learn this in his own time. If he's not doing it now, it's either because he is not quite yet strong enough to (standing up from sitting takes slightly different muscles than walking does), or he doesn't want to. If it's a matter of want, you can help that along by leaving him be when he falls over or is sitting. ...


2

My son was able to hold his head up from birth (which actually had me worried!) When I asked the Dr I was told it was perfectly normal for some babies to be able to do that.


2

My little guy started counting to six at 12 months and now at 16 months counts to 10 . He can recognize the numbers in any order and say it from memory on his own and start at any number. I guess it all depends on the child, every child is amazing and unique.


2

Three and a half months is much too early to be trying to stand up. Most babies don't start to stand up whilst holding something until around 7-9 months although they may be putting weight on their legs before then with help. 3.5 months is even very early for sitting up. Here is a link for what you might expect babies to be doing at any particular age. "Can ...


1

From my experience children are usually either "walkers" or "talkers". The ones that walk early have lower language skills and vice versa. There are also ones more in the middle of the spectrum, but they mostly seem to lean one way. My daughter showed no interest in walking or even crawling or getting up on hands and knees until about 14 months. At that ...


1

I teach seventh grade (11 turning 12), and though the kids understand periods like months and years intellectually, many don't have an emotional feel for it. Any reward or punishment more than a week in the future is worthless. Anything more is so far in the future that it's insignificant compared to "now". If you want to help him grasp "one month", like ...


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