Hot answers tagged

105

Watch YouTube with your child, then you will know what they are watching. A toddler can wander onto something by accident and see something they cannot un-see. Do not let your toddler wander the Internet alone, it is a very dangerous place. There are no safeguards that are 100% effective at blocking adult material on the Internet, except adult ...


38

My personal opinion is that there are no sites I would consider appropriately curated. This is something you should watch with them, discuss with them, and if needed, change channel. I don't know of any unbiased news channels, either on television, or via the internet (so your comment about not allowing TV news but allowing tablets doesn't really help you)...


35

It appears there are some parental controls in YouTube. Scroll to the bottom of the page and look for something that says "Safety" or "Safety Mode". Switch it to on. You can optionally lock it for the browser as well. (You may have to be logged in for all of this to work.) That should enable Google's safe search and do some measure of parental controls. ...


29

If your kids are using mobile devices, you may find the YouTube Kids app to be a viable alternative and a quick solution. This is only available on Google Play and the iTunes App Store, so Amazon Fire users are out of luck. The app itself filters the content to suitable material for kids. You can see more about the app in the YouTubeKids Parental Guide. ...


29

I've got a hard time explaining the motives of the terrorists. I don't know whether this is the best article on the subject (it's near the top of this Google search) but for example What Motivates Terrorists? starts with, One of the most frequently asked questions about terrorism is also the most intractable. Why? Why do they do it? Why do people join ...


14

This is the line I've taken, for better or worse... Like in school we trust teachers to be telling the truth about things in lessons. The people who attacked France, were told lies by their teachers but they really, really believe them - they think that we're bad people and they're good. So they want us to live their way. The way they were taught tells ...


14

If you don't start teaching them yourself, they will learn it from their friends. If you wait until you think they're"ready", you'll wait until it's too late. The news media has always been subject to manipulation for propaganda purposes, and awareness of that is an important step towards developing critical thinking skills. Be rational about the news, ...


10

Just my two cents, I think one great way to get started with world news is to get a World Map or a globe. That way, when they look at the news headlines and images, they have a mental reference point. For example, they may hear of deteriorating North Korea - Japan relations, and looking at the map will help to cement their understanding of why those two ...


9

Good and recent examples where the father is present throughout? Good luck! Having said that: Bonanza comes to mind - though its been a really long time since I saw any of it and his kids are mostly adults. Growing pains, Cosby, Family ties, Full House and Brady bunch dads/uncles had it together most episodes (most of these dads are of course, not ...


8

It appears that children don't learn language well from television because they need interaction and conversation. It's not so much that the "picture on a flat device [isn't] a person", but more that the child doesn't get a response when they try to talk back to the picture. In one study, when children had a conversation over Skype with an adult, ...


8

There are alternatives for Youtube that only host content that's safe for children. You might try to search for one of those. I know there is the Dutch "kindertube.nl" and I could find links to "toddlertube.com", although that seems to be offline. Alternatively, there might also be some companies and tv-channels that host some of their content online to ...


8

The only solution that has worked for us is to have our son, who is 6 years old, logged into my Google account on YouTube so I can follow his history and block any YouTubers that we don't want him to watch. I have not found a way to block an individual video, but you can block a channel. Go to the Channels page then "About" then click on the "Flag" and ...


8

I wonder how helpful "Bad Romance" would be for learning English, when most of it is composed of nonsense syllables: Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh! Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh! Caught in a bad romance Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh! Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh! Caught in a bad romance Rah rah ah-ah-ah! Ro mah ro-mah-mah Gaga oh-la-la! Want your bad romance Rah rah ah-ah-ah! Ro mah ro-mah-...


8

Love the video, but I don't think that strobe flashing is good for him. The American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation is: Avoid digital media use (except video-chatting) in children younger than 18 to 24 months. Having said that, there are times in which a video is far better than the alternative: stress from excess tiredness, frustration with a ...


7

It sounds like your son has developed quite a bad habit there. Eating in front of the television is not good, so I think you'll want to nip this habit in the bud straight away. It might seem harsh, but I really think you should simply wait it out. Don't turn on the TV, no matter what. He'll eat when he gets hungry enough. Don't make a big fuss, and don't ...


7

I am assuming small children, maybe 6-10 years. EDIT: I missed the toddler tag. I will let this answer stand as it is for the time when your children are 6-10 years old. I would strongly suggest to never ever let toddlers (1-3) view Youtube alone. Technical answer: Linux solution My kids watch Youtube, how to monitor what they see? I did that myself ...


6

In addition to the good ideas already mentioned (keep computer in public area, watch with your child when possible, and install a child safety filter), I recommend disabling Youtube on the child's account, and downloading videos you are comfortable allowing the child to watch on his or her own.


6

You don't specify whether this is on a tablet -- but in case it is: What we do, with our daughter's tablet, is to use an app called "Kids Place" to "fence them in" within a kid-safe environment. There is a further app called "Kids video" in which you can list specific allowed videos -- from Youtube or locally on the tablet. This works extremely well, and ...


6

As a father dealing with the same issue I can tell you that there's no TV or movie that's really going to help with that situation. I also sympathize with his situation. Before my first child was born I was concerned that the lack of good role models was going to hurt my ability to be a good parent, and I looked all around in books, TV, movies, etc for ...


6

The BBC is generally pretty good. Of course any individual article will have it's own particular slant and the BBC does put out opinion based pieces but news is generally pretty neutral overall and the BBC does a pretty good job as a whole of being balanced, which is arguably better than eliminating all trace of opinion. Also mainstream (ie those which are ...


6

I don't tell my children a great deal about current news yet. We do talk about what is going on in the world around them. I don't personally care to watch the news myself, I tend to read it and so does my spouse. I do tell my 10yr old that news sources are biased and you have to take that into account. I also tell him that his parents are biased and ...


6

TLDR; This needs work long term. My approach would be to: Limit the screen time. Do not have any screens when out of the house (unless the hosts propose watching something). Long version: My kids love watching TV and playing video games. My compromise is to limit the amount of time and not to give any more. Since it has already become a habit for your ...


5

Like many topics, I think adults tend to be the ones whose ideas can't handle things like violence and conflict (and talking about such things with children), moreso than that children can't handle it. Children are quite capable of talking about violence, war, and sexuality, and they do so, even in Kindergarten, even if adults are carefully avoiding such ...


5

The only answer is to supervise, imo. The TV and computers/tablets are in a common area -- no exceptions. You watch with them or at least you stay in the same area. If they go 'off channel', remove the device. Sure I get real life isn't like that. It's tough. You have to parent them and still do all the chores and so sometimes that means they can't watch ...


5

Depending on what browser you/they are using, you can write an Adblock Plus filter to hide the suggestions sidebar on YouTube. This isn't possible with Internet Explorer, but is possible with either Chrome or Firefox. The filter to use is youtube.com##div#watch7-sidebar-contents - this will remove the suggested videos and "up next" video (make sure that ...


3

You Could create a very huge playlist for them and start it with auto play and with Adfree extension for them and then disable the mouse/Touchpad from the PC. It will be a bit hard to enable it back but you can use an external mouse to enable the touch pad.


3

At such a young age, there isn't a great degree of direct teaching you can do which will be effective. Modeling appropriate behavior is very likely your best option. When we see bad, rude, or unsavory actions whether on television, in a movie, or in our everyday lives, we can talk to our children and say, "That was so mean. I don't like that." The nature ...


3

This is specifically for the 8 years old one: Don't use television / streams / video in general as the primary source for news. Go for the "slow" route of newspapers, prints and similar stuff. This firstly is great to control the graphic content as newspapers tend to publish more text, less images - and that is what news are all about. Secondly, you are ...


3

I would look at other songs. My kids are being tutored in a language and it wouldn't please me to have them taught a song with explicit lyrics and have them explained/interpreted by someone else. As much as I think children need to be taught about sex, I think that is entirely up to the parents as to when and how when we are talking 8 years old. By 8 all ...


3

In a comment expanding on the question, you state, I'm looking for a method that is kind of concise and closes the matter immediately rather than the chain of "why's" that I know I plagued my parents with when their answer was just straight up "no because we said so". Please read this in the spirit it's given, because it sounds rough. There is no ...


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