64

We follow the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding approach. The Division of Responsibility for toddlers through adolescents The parent is responsible for what, when, where. The child is responsible for how much and whether. Fundamental to parents’ jobs is trusting children to determine how much and whether to eat from what parents provide. When ...


35

This parent is of the strong opinion that if the kid does not eat a proper amount for every meal, on a structured timetable the kid will fall behind (growth wise, intelligence wise, discipline wise). Simply put, this parent is wrong. Pressuring children to eat is not only unnecessary, but actively harmful: studies have shown that it leads children to both ...


12

Our approach, that has worked with each of our seven kids, is very simple; we make more or less simple meals, always with some veggies. The kids are free to not eat, but no replacement is provided. If they are hungry, they are free to grab fruit from the fridge. Worked fine over the last 18 years.


12

We've got two working adults and three kids — we're very familiar with the scheduling challenges this causes. (Once your daughter starts having extracurricular activities, things will only get more hectic!) First off, if you want the whole family to be eating the same meal at the same time, a snack on the way home for your daughter is pretty critical to ...


11

If it's the kid's idea to wear an apron at the table, then there's no reason why not. Moreover, if your oldest initiated the practice herself, then younger children may naturally follow suit. However, at some point, any child is going to bridle at an imposed restriction like this. (When a sixteen-year-old has a friend over for dinner, are they going to be ...


11

While many of our friends kept making their kids individual meals after they had moved onto solid food, we deliberately took the opposite approach, giving them exactly what we were having. If they didn't want it they could do without. And they rapidly realised they wanted to eat everything! This includes Thai, Mexican, Indian, Italian...you name it. And ...


8

We don't have a television in our dining room, deliberately so we can eat together as a family and enjoy that time talking about the day etc. That said, during the Olympics last summer, as the kids are so sport-obsessed, we did occasionally have carpet picnics in the front room where the TV is, and I think they did enjoy that as a special treat.


7

https://www.ellynsatterinstitute.org/how-to-feed/the-division-of-responsibility-in-feeding/ The parent is responsible for what, when and where. Your child is responsible for how much and whether. So sure, it seems reasonable for a daycare/preschool/kindergarden to establish that this time period is for eating, and when that period is done, it's time to ...


5

We decided upon a fairly simple approach based upon our own experiences as children, our beliefs, various observations, study, and discussion. We taught an expectation of at least trying everything that is served at least once, keeping in mind any previously discovered likes and dislikes. We also encourage input from the children and make reasonable ...


4

How about giving her a small amount of food that doesn't need preperation as soon as she gets home? Enough food for her to be less hungry, but not that much that she's really full? That way you or your husband can prepare the main dish as soon as you're home, and she can eat with you? Or ask the daycare if it is possible to give her some fruit between 4:00-...


4

TV during meal times is a big debate. There has been a rule when I grew up that the TV should be off during meals. Technically, the enforcement was easy since the dining table was set in the kitchen with no direct view in the living room. At my grandparents' at that time, TV was on during breakfast. In my opinion, I prefer to have the TV off during the ...


3

I think a hourglass to stop eating time is not just a bad idea but bight be dangerous in the long run. Because the feeling of being full is not only dependent on the amount of food someone consumed but also on time. all-about-slow-eating But to answer if there is even a need to work on her eating at all, the question is not so much how fast she eats but if ...


3

We've found that having toys is much more of a net negative — particularly the distraction aspect. This is especially the case once the kids get a little older, and the toy of choice is more complex (e.g. Legos being assembled at the table) or expensive (e.g. a flashlight, a talking robot thing). Who wants to eat boring spaghetti when they could be literally ...


3

In addition to Erica's detailed and excellent answer, a few notes for how we handle this (in a similar situation). Most of our meals are planned around our schedules. We have nights that one of us is home a bit earlier, and nights one of us will be home later (or both). On nights that we can be home a bit earlier, we plan dinners that might take a bit of ...


3

Stop it, you're getting it all wrong. Fighting with a child at any time is particularly bad. It is your behaviour that has led to this and you should stop it immediately (I'm assuming that as it's your son you are one of the parents mentioned here). Not talking about anything but eating at meals times is also very negative. It is you that needs to change (...


2

Simple Answer: You shouldn't unless you are sure that this won't become a habit If you teach your kid that she can get a special treatment, she will try to get special treatment everywhere else as well, ending up as the "spoiled brat" and with serious troubles with other children or later people. The only way she should be able to get an alternative meal ...


2

We may have TV on during mealtimes, we may not - it all depends on what activity was going on before the food hits the table. I feel that if you arbitrarily force someone to stop doing something it creates a negative response. How I handle this is, when it's on, it can be used as a useful tool to ensure our 4yo actually eats something; I keep the remote ...


1

I am thinking there may be a general issue of establishing appropriate routines in general, as it is impossible to have any consistent routine if meals are all over the place (unfortunately I know this from experience). Ultimately, habits define the kind of person we are, and routine can be thought of as the basis of or even synonymous to habit. Routines in ...


1

I'm a retired teacher - I worked with special Education for 15 years. I would like to suggest that since this is for one meal, let the child show you what they want for dinner, it will give you some insight to what they are drawn to, and you then can make more healthy adjustments. For example they may put candy on their plate, some bread and some nuts. ...


1

We don't have a TV in the house at all and haven't for years (though I watched a lot of TV as a kid and jokingly blame that for all the befalls me now as an adult). However, on occasions, about once every two weeks, we bring the notebook computer to the table and watch a documentary on Netflix or Amazon. Usually it's also the pizza night, which is itself an ...


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