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26

It's a common issue at around that age, both ours had issues with '6' for some reason and skipped from 5 to 7 and the younger one later got stuck with '13' for a short while. The best thing to do is practice with them and they will get there. Practicing counting as a song / rhyme (like 1-2 buckle my shoe) is one good way to help them to remember the ...


10

There are different ideas of "counting" Memorizing 10 words in a row. If they started to speak early and practice a lot, they can manage it when they are about two years old. Being able to count the number of items/fingers etc. My daughter and her friends started doing this correctly when they were four years old.


9

I'm not a child psychologist, but I've also observed this as common behavior, and my intuition is that it comes from learning the numbers as a sequence, not as having actual intrinsic meaning. I've been trying to get my kids to remember the sequence of stops on the subway line we live on for years, and there's a couple they almost always skip — mostly ...


9

The crux of your issue is an English problem, not a Math problem! I feel the question asked in the title and the issue described in the body are quite different, so I'll address them both, one at a time. The English Problem As you've described, your son is asking questions in an ambiguous way, and there is no point in teaching him the concepts behind one of ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


8

Because you care about mathematical concepts and your daughter learning them, most likely she will learn them. You will point them out and talk about them. "see honey, you had one slice of banana, now, you have more slices of banana." You will be drawn to stories that contain math concepts (yes, they are out there) and games that teach mathematical ...


8

I have had some success (in an unpaid, friend of the family or parent of the child's friend kind of way) with the following approach: Stop referring to them, even inside your own head as lazy-to-think. While that is one possible explanation for them not answering, or blurting out any old number without working it out first, there are plenty of others: they ...


8

The best age is "when you need them". But let me elaborate: Math starts way before school, because you need mathematical concepts to explain the everyday world. But we usually don't call it "Math", unless we are thinking about it. Start with simple counting: Count the apples when buying them at the store. Count the chairs at the table. Count fingers, toes,...


8

I've taught eighth grade (13-14 year-old kids) algebra for 28 years. The kids who arrive at middle school not knowing their basic multiplication facts are very unlikely to succeed in math in high school. Those facts are fundamental to everything from multiplication to division to fractions to factoring polynomials. They don't really understand any of these ...


8

Maybe your daughter is not good at maths and getting increasingly frustrated. I had a time where I was bad at maths, too. And in the end, it turned out I am not at all bad at maths, I just had bad teachers and even the people from my family trying to help me were not good for me because they made me feel like I am bad at maths. Never get angry. Never tell ...


8

I'd try a balance of gross motor activities, fine motor activities and reading and arithmetic. Many of these activities are pre-math and pre-reading. Your child should also be well into learning to make choices and decisions. These ideas cover from 24 months to five years. Do not expect your son to do all of these with any skill. You are building the skills. ...


7

All children are different, learn at different paces and are stronger in some things than others. This is just the way things are. What you may not realise is that the whole time you've been helping your now 4 year old to count, the younger one has been listening and absorbing. My two children (8 and 6) read at the same band of books and I think the 6yo ...


7

Surely the base you learn with is arbitrary? I would argue that if you raised your child in total isolation, meaning that it wouldn't ever encounter the base 10 decimal system, this would hold true. The common assumption why we prefer base 10 is because we have ten fingers, but this never convinced me that base 10 is more "natural" than, say, base 6 (we ...


6

This may seem counterintuitive, but babies and small children will do the best at math if they are told stories and learn to tell stories themselves. O'Neille et al. (below) found that storytelling is an essential precursor for the development of logical thinking. This makes sense when you think about the fact that storytelling is ingrained in centuries of ...


6

The solution is in your question : some of them also early decide that they will be artists, dancers, athletes, house-wives, etc so they don't need mathematics. Involve their goal/hobbies/interests in your teaching. There is a high level of opportunity there. Applied mathematics are probably the key for most people having issues with formal mathematics....


6

Chrys' Answer covers most of the ground I was going to, but one suggestion might be gamification. From what you've said, some children see no value in going beyond basic maths, and while you might be able to convince them that those jobs they plan for require maths (good luck being a householder who can't balance a monthly budget), that's not always valid, ...


6

21 months is pretty spot on, or even a bit earlier than a lot of the kids I've seen. You don't mention how consistent she is about it (gets them in the correct order every time, doesn't skip numbers), but if she is not only able to count to 10 but not mix them up or skip some, then I think that is great! Here is a nice article detailing how a child moves ...


5

I wouldn't worry about it too much. Certainly don't make your child feel bad/stressed about it. As James said, "look for opportunities to count up to that 'missing' number". Here's something I've tried: Play a game where the tickle monster will be hiding/waiting until it hears a number. The exchange goes like this (say the troublesome number is 12): Me: ...


5

My son is 4 and a half and he only just started counting up to 10. We're going to practise that for a while before we do 11-20. In contrast his older sister could count to 20 already before she was 4. So, I wouldn't worry too much - kids develop at different speeds. With my older daughter I noticed it was harder for her to learn 11 to 20 than it was for 1 ...


5

I taught Spec Ed, so this isn't in my bag of tricks. If the teacher is willing to just have her sit in class, and IF she is getting all her work done, including assignments, perhaps she could be allowed to do other homework assignments, or read or draw quietly at her desk? I don't know what country you are in. In many areas they teach to the lowest ...


5

Follow the kid Education is about watching the child and trying to bring out the things that are already in there. If your child is interested in numbers, there's no reason not to talk about them and play with them. I sang the numbers and letters to all my kids. Play with the things they enjoy playing with. Don't worry that playing with something now will ...


5

When they were quite young, I signed my kids up for some sort of tutoring service (I thought it was Kumon, but it was in a separate retail space facility, not at home, so I might be misremembering the exact company). My boys really enjoyed playing video games, and this company used on-line games to teach concepts, so I thought it was a great way to sneak a ...


5

Let me propose some questions that are, I think, analogous to this one: Would it be child abuse to raise your child by teaching them to exclusively speak an artificial language like Toki Pona or Esperanto, rather than the language spoken in the locale where they live? Would it be child abuse to raise your child by teaching them to read and write every word ...


4

I'm not convinced there's an age at which kids CANNOT learn something. You certainly need the basic building blocks before you can start constructing a tower, but at any age they seem to have the ability to learn all sorts of mathematical concepts. Verbalizing them is something entirely different, of course. First, to directly address your question about ...


4

There can't be such thing as a "typical age" for this milestone (I mean, more precise than "about 2 years old"). Keep in mind that toddler's vocabulary is quite limited : mean [Language Development Survey] vocabulary scores at 24 months have been between 175 and 195 words, with standard deviations in the range of 70 to 80 (Klee et al., 1998; Rescorla &...


4

I agree with anongoodnurse, but want to add some additional advice. It's mostly about other options to gather more information on what the root of the problem could be. So he is struggling with math and takes very long to complete his homework. 1) Talk to his classmates' parents You mention in your edit, that you talked to his teacher and he receives ...


3

I'm sure there will be more detailed and informative answers, but to start things off: Show her how the math she's learning now (at 14, probably some variety of Algebra, possibly Geometry) will inform later studies in a wide variety of subjects. Sure, some of algebra is a bit boring, but you have to know how to solve X=2X+4 before you can master physics, ...


3

The current trend in test-driven school systems like in the United States is to introduce the formal academics too early. By "formal" I mean where you sit down with a page full of problems that you solve for its own sake. That means the role of parents today is largely helping your children keep up and not feel frustrated or stupid at not quite being ready ...


3

Many math teachers fall into the trap to teaching only the procedural knowledge of math--that is, they get so wrapped up in teaching the steps to successfully work the problem that they forget to teach their students the declarative knowledge of math--the WHY they need to be able to do math. As balanced mama said, the more you can incorporate real life and ...


3

Check out Khan Academy, Math Mammoth, Saxon, Abeka, Singapore, Math-U-See, and Miquon. Those are the major curricula used by homeschoolers. The leap pad 2 tablets have some nice math games, and there are tons of apps for iPad and Android if you search the app stores. You can find a lot of individual activities by searching pinterest or teacherspayteachers....


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