35

You need a better plan, kid. This will be a bit of a harsh answer, but you definitely seem smart and mature enough to deserve one. First of all, don't waste a single further breath explaining your "philosophical" objections to school, why you feel it's bullshit, to your dad. No dad has the slightest bit of regard for his son's "wisdom" on things like that. ...


31

Try a two-pronged approach: Teach proper technique. Many of us were taught to tilt the face upward when swallowing, but recent research see here shows, that this actually makes it harder to swallow. The suggestion is to either a) put the pill on the tongue, then suck a big gulp of water from a plastic bottle or b) put the pill on the tongue, take some water ...


25

The answer will depend on a lot on all parties involved and your expectations: The child: Is your child able to remember to take the coat? And bring it back home? I have two children that were both raised to be independent and responsible - Yet, my 9 yo still struggles to remember basic things (there is a reason he owns 4 pairs of gloves...) and we had ...


21

There's technique as @Stephie detailed (+1 btw), but don't forget the psychology. No one wants to swallow a pill, especially young ones (rather ironic since they don't always want to chew their food well, either). For my daughter, we made it a game: Get the boat to float in the water and then swallow it all. Years later she still referred to "floating the ...


15

The What's Cooking with Kids website has some excellent suggestions on how to ease kids into chopping and there are some excellent alternative chopping equipment out there that I never even thought about. Obviously, you can always turn to the food processor or blender for chopping. These are good, but if yours are like mine, they're a pain in the butt to ...


12

For us it was two simple information radiators: the shopping list on the fridge and the weekly meal plan hung up nearby. Once a child could write, if they used something up they had to write it on the shopping list. If they wanted something we didn't have, they had to write it on the shopping list and we generally bought it. Yes, this resulted in some ...


11

Here are a few things I've recommended. I know this might gross some people out. Some pills (some antibiotics and others) are notoriously bitter/ bad tasting. As soon as they hit the tongue, they start to dissolve, leaving a bad taste and a desire to spit the thing out, which only makes you hold it there longer and get more bad taste in the mouth. A butter ...


10

It's the parent's responsibility to set up the environment to encourage success. In the specific case of remembering to wear a coat on cold days this may mean, for example, keeping coats on hooks by the door instead of hung up in a closet with a door that's kept shut. It may mean saying "coat!" as the child opens the doorknob to leave. It may mean inventing ...


9

It's pretty hard for a parent to accept their child not going to college nowadays. There are lower number of job opportunities for a high school graduate and the pay is lower. My guess is your dad isn't very happy about your career move and doesn't know how to articulate it. My advice for you is two part. My career advice is try some college courses online ...


8

While setting examples for both work ethic and life balance, you should think out loud, because you also need to set the example of how to make decisions that weigh one against the other. Present it not as a lecture, but just a musing on your choices. This works for all sorts of decision-making, like how to spend/save money, how to tell someone something but ...


8

I'm all for not going to college, but I'm way more for not working. As someone who thought that same thing let me warn you that after school you know what's there? work. tons of it and not always in a good way. It's a lot harder to go back than it is to go with it from high school. From my friends that went, it's not really the degree as much as the life ...


8

Everyone learns in their own way. I love going to classes/seminars/workshops, but for a while I dated a guy who couldn't understand why I would do that, as he learned best on his own, reading through material and studying it. Your son is old enough now that his statement that he likes to learn things on his own reflects some good self-knowledge, and I would ...


8

You have two parts to your question and I'll try and address both. "Free" Chores and Pocket Money Growing up, there were always chores I had that were just things that were expected of me. Cleaning my room, cleaning the bathroom, feeding the dog, etc. These things were never rewarded with extra cash (or anything else for that matter). It was just part ...


7

In general, you should be praising effort rather than results. A child that has difficulty remembering Grandma's name, and thinks hard and remembers, should be praised for the effort to try and remember. A child that has a hard time walking should be praised for the effort to try and walk, whether or not it is successful. As such, the "Wow" is sort-of-...


7

I don't think there's a definitive answer as children vary widely in coordination and ability at a given age. Enthusiasm also is a big factor. My son has been helping unload the dishwasher, load and unload the washing machine and dryer since he was 1 and a half. We didn't ask him to do anything, he just walked over and started doing it because he wanted to ...


6

As a kid, I learned by putting the pill in a dab of yogurt on a teaspoon. It was the old-fashion thick yogurt with lots of sugar. Unlike a pill (or even a piece of small candy) swallowing a blob of yogurt feels natural. The yogurt acted as a lubricant against the pill sticking to a dry mouth or tongue. The yogurt also overpowers the bitter taste you ...


5

you may want to try carrying your child in a sling or baby carrier (there are many to chose from at all different price points) instead of holding them. We used this brand successfully https://www.mayawrap.com/ . Also when picking up a child or anything heavy/awkward make sure you squat instead of bend over at the waist. Hope this helps.


5

No, this doesn't give them the same benefits as you got from learning electronics. It gives them different benefits, sure, and programming is a much bigger industry than it was thirty years ago, but electronics is actually a bigger industry than it was when we were kids, too. Scratch is useful, but it doesn't give people that understanding of underlying ...


5

I don't have an academic answer unfortunately, but experientially, for the most part the biggest issue seems to be that the mindset of the child is different in a conversation with their parents than with a teacher. My children were entirely differently behaved in daycare versus at home, when they were younger. My oldest refused to nap under any ...


5

Just to add to Timur Shtatlands great advice; Try to get gifted children to explore things which they normally would not try, for example, if the child really likes science, it is beneficial to encourage them to take up something in the arts, or a sport. Be patient, it might take a few tries before you find something they love, but this really helps ...


4

One of the best strategies I have used to deal with this with my own daughter is telling her stories about how things were for me at her age. "Did you know that my best friend moved away when I was in 3rd grade?" This usually distracts her and piques her curiosity. I will then answer her questions about what that was like, how things got better, etc. I ...


4

I always hated taking pills. Here are some things that helped me: Practice swallowing with soft and slimy food objects first. I recommend standard (cooked) cheesy noodles made with elbow or shell macaroni. Pick one noodle out with your spoon and see if you can swallow it without chewing. (Disclaimer: Supervise in case of choking. I never had problems with ...


4

Anything that is big enough that I'm tempted to hire it out is a candidate for kids extra spending money. Mowing the grass is an example - the 8 year old can earn $10.00 in about an hour of healthy supervised outdoor activity. I do some short cash contract work. When I have work that I can subtender to my kids, I will pay them market rates. Examples are ...


3

For younger kids: One thing that worked for us (once the kids learned to read) was a 2-prong approach: Explain in detail the heathfulness of specific ingredients (starting with "junk"/"good for you" at early age, to more in depth science later on). Have them read all the ingredients on any item in the kitchen, and discuss the items overall healthfulness. ...


3

I was terrible at swallowing pills for years. My inability to swallow tablets and capsules was a contributing factor to simply lying down in bed when I had a headache instead of taking some Tylenol, for example. The few times where I had an acute condition that required swallowing a pill, it would be a big chore that occasionally resulting in spitting out ...


3

I used to have the worst problems both with taste and with it sticking to my tongue, and this technique solved both issues for me. I'm the only one I know who does this, and I'm not sure how I came up with it, but maybe it will help. I actually put pills under my tongue, just behind my bottom front teeth. Then as the water comes in, I use the tip of my ...


3

While some pills you can't really do much about, many medicines (such as pain relievers, antihistamines, etc.) come in several different forms, and some are easier to swallow than others. In the same vein as the 'training' idea, if he has to take a Claritin every day, get the kind that have a coating that tastes good or even the ones that dissolve in the ...


3

The technique that worked for me was to gently hold the pill between my back teeth, take a big gulp of water and let release the pill as I swallow the water. That way, the pill isn't sitting on your tongue tasting nasty and sticking to it. I've never tried to teach a child to swallow pills but I did use that technique to teach a ~20-year-old adult who'd ...


3

Yes, she's probably ready. I think the most important criterion in deciding whether or not to try learning to use a knife is willingness to follow directions. If she's not listening to and obeying every word you say, no knife practice, period. That and sufficient gross motor and fine motor skills to control the knife would be important. If she can handle ...


3

The "think about your future" argument is one of the most important arguments you can actually have. It's just a fallacy to think that school is the only option for you to plan your future. While it was harder for your father when he was young, today we have the internet, mostly free or inexpensive libraries, so your access to knowledge is almost limitless. ...


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