44

There is an old Indian story: A lady and her son went to a monk asking about her son's sugar problem. The monk said, "Come back here in 10 days." After 10 days she went back to the monk with her son. Now the monk says to her son, "Kid, do not eat sugar. It is not good for your health." Surprised, the mother asked, "Why did you not say ...


27

Edit: scientific content deleted as I am not able to find, in reasonable time, the exact references needed to support it. It will, in all likelihood, be unrealistic to really keep your toddlers away from sweets completely. That said: Eat less sweets yourself. You do not need to make a science of this, and you certainly do not need to count anything. You ...


18

In a study for the Journal of the American Dietetic Association (Story, et al), researchers looked at the causes of unhealthy adolescent eating behaviors, and they are many! This is some of what you are up against: rapid growth means high caloric and nutritional needs skipping breakfast becomes a common practice many adolescents become less physically ...


13

You are way over-thinking this. What you present for this parent is an opportunity to teach their child that other people make decisions that are different from their family. This child is going to encounter plenty of classmates that have junk food at their houses. Learning to evaluate food choices when others are making alternate food choices is a life ...


10

I have a slightly Zen answer to this, which is that you shouldn't say an absolute "no" to sweets. Limit the amounts, by all means, only to specific occasions if possible. But do not categorically say no. The problem with making something forbidden is that it makes it much more desirable, especially to children but also to adults. There is a type of snack ...


9

We usually keep rice cakes as a snack for the kids. They weigh effectively nothing, but are quite large, which means it keeps them busy for a long time. They are soft and melt in your mouth, so no real need to chew, although you could. They are made from only puffed rice (some with added salt, but not all of them). So the nutritional value is actually ...


7

You have some pretty good answers already, but as someone who struggles with similar cravings, I wanted to answer from the perspective that it might not be strictly a matter of self-control and discipline. There are several other cravings bodies have that can be mistaken for food cravings. Having low energy can cause a craving for energy-dense foods. You ...


7

Dried fruits keep well and the ones without added sugar are healthy. Recently we've had great success with dried banana chips. NB Some raisins may contain added sulphur to keep them longer.


7

Cheerios. Every kid loves cheerios. And now they're gluten free!


6

There is a pretty clear link between soda consumption and obesity. See, for example, https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/sugary-drinks-fact-sheet/ Awareness around this link is clearly rising and as a result soda consumption in the US has started to decline http://www.businessinsider.com/americans-are-drinking-less-soda-2016-3 Still, the average ...


5

Most kids will eat fairly well and self manage if you set the right boundary conditions and stop making a fuss about it, which makes it into a an attention-grabbing power struggle. Things that can help are Routine & Consistency: set fixed meal times every day. Sit down with the family and do a little fun ritual (sing, clap, yodle, whatever) Make sure ...


5

A friend and I were talking about that last night. My personal deal with Halloween candy is actually not the Halloween candy itself, but its representation of the beginning of a season of on-going candy and sweets and treats that come trekking through my house from now until after Christmas. This dentist in Virginia has a good set of policies and the ...


4

It's difficult even for teenagers and adults to understand and acknowledge the fact that too much sweets are bad for one's health (and weight). At 2yo you can try explaining - you will or will not succed in that. But the most important thing is to limit the amount of sweets to an absolute minumum (ie. special occasions like family visits or birthdays). It'...


4

I think this depends on the age of the child, to some extent. I have two toddler/preschool aged kids, and for us rationing from a common bowl on top of the fridge works perfectly: they can't steal extras, and there's only one bowl so no arguing over 'better candy'. However, once they're a bit older (and probably not much), I think rationing is the wrong ...


4

Rather than not making sweets available and offering only healthful foods instead, my gut instinct tells me that it would make more sense to create some structure in sweets consumption. Your daughter is big enough that she will soon be able to buy junk food on her own, and presumably she can already binge eat at a friend's place if the opportunity comes ...


4

It would be best to think of sugary drinks like candy - a treat to be enjoyed once in a while. There is no nutritional value in sugary soft drinks, the sugar is just empty calories. Very little nutritional value in sugary fruit juices either. So I'd not forbid them, but I wouldn't routinely stock the house with such items. I got to liking unsweetened tea ...


3

Try starting with smaller dishes, smaller portions, less often. Precede it with a physical activity like a walk or swim. Follow with a set ritual like tooth brushing an hour after sugary meals. (thanks Tony for that info!). Rishi is also correct. It starts with your example. There are plenty of things (like alcohol or driving) that children are not allowed ...


3

I buy a lot of Organix snacks for my son and these all keep, out of the fridge, for quite some time, provided they don't get too hot.


3

Gatorade isn't really "junk". I would give him $1 only per day. He can buy the Gatorade, or "save" so that he can buy a snowcone in 2 days. A lot of lessons there -- having a budget, delaying gratification. My opinion: it is important for him to have some freedom to buy stuff with his friends at a special more-independent place like camp. Even if he has more ...


3

I think this is a good question, but I'm not sure there really is a right or wrong answer per se. Families always have their own traditions within larger holiday traditions. Some kids open presents on christmas eve, some aren't allowed to until after church christmas morning. It really just depends on your family. The only thing I can think of is that as ...


2

There are two ways we've handled halloween specifically. The first is that you are in control of the nights activities. You can limit the number of houses they go to while acquiring their bounty. Just watch how full those bags get and when they are close to the limit, let the kids know they have "2 more houses". Then take them home or do a different ...


2

She's old enough that she may begin to understand the health implications of sugary food. While great as a treat, when eating too much of it can cause weight gain diabetes poor nutrition (because sugar is eaten instead of foods with vitamins and minerals) You should educate yourself first on why specifically junk food needs to be limited. Then start ...


2

I believe the "why" is best explained by experience and example. And that example should be you and your husband. At 2 years old, your daughter doesn't have the attention span to listen to all the research on why sugar is bad for you. And even if she did, she doesn't have the foresight at that age to realize that healthy habits now lead to a healthy body, ...


2

I think you should try to avoid sugar eating habits in her life. Young children are drawn to fats and sugars. Instead of giving candies or juices our family tries to find tasty fruits and vegetables. The main reason is to teach good habits. At previous birthdayparty at our house none of the dozen kids wanted soft drinks. They asked for home made juice. ...


2

Basically I agree with @Nilah's answer. Once a child gets constipated badly enough that it causes a significant amount of pain to pass stool, they decide to hold it in until they can't anymore, and it tends to be hard and painful again, reinforcing the cycle of painful defecation leading to withholding leading to painful defecation. Sidenote - I believe ...


1

First, don't fall into the trap that healthy food has to taste like rubbish. Pizza is actually quite healthy. It's vegetables, meats, and dairy served on a flatbed. A complete balanced meal. Ramen, served up like in Japan, can be healthy too. Use a hearty real vegetable and/or meat broth, vegetables, real meat topping, and slide up a boiled egg on top. ...


1

We keep a few of these in our car at all times: trail mix: high in protein in case we are delayed for a meal or coming back from an activity apple sauce (unsweetened): good source of fiber, satisfies a sweet tooth. the pouches are great because they don't require utensils cheerios or goldfish: we actually get the organic bunnies, but we keep an entire box ...


1

Bread sticks hardly ever go off and kids love too munch on them although they crumble and go on the car interior, flapjack in a sealed container sugary and a bit sticky but will a bait an appetite, banana chips and apple rings are great for teething, homemade oaty biscuits and those packets of mini salamis x


1

Trail Mix Beef Jerky, Turkey Jerky, Salmon Jerky, etc. Freeze dried, or regular dried, fruit. Bars (we eat Lara Bars), though the "healthy" of this might be somewhat questionable Of these, there are those that are healthy, and those that are no so healthy, high/low sodium or fat. But these foods are, in their "natural" state, inherently healthy when not ...


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