8

Well, since you know she's having a sister, I'm guessing your wife is pretty far along in her pregnancy. Obviously, the sooner you get started, the better. Discussing with your daughter that mommy is going to have a new baby and sort of figuring out what your daughter understands about babies. Some kids sort of have this idea when Daddy and Mommy say they'...


7

This is a perfect chance to teach them about variation. It's important to understand that your test scores will vary based on how you're feeling on that particular day; a 93 is only about 4% lower than a 97 and it's unlikely the test is really that sensitive. There may even be the possibility of retesting if the lower-scoring twin doesn't think they did ...


6

This is pretty normal for siblings, and there are a lot of factors in play. The toy somebody plays with always seems more interesting. There is a book Siblings without Rivalry which discusses it in details. I would suggest to do the following: Establish ownership. Each kid does not have to share his toy (of course, they can be asked, but don't insist). If ...


5

In my opinion this is very common behavior. He probably wants to both be part of what B does, and maybe to retaliate. Our 3 year old does this quite common to his little brother, 13 months old. He still love his little brother, I and I bet A loves B a lot still. Does A share well with kids his own age? At 4, he is probably used to having some 'discussion' -...


5

Sounds pretty normal to me, at least up to a point. 3 and 17 months here, and not that different; except the 17 month old stands up to himself a bit better. We handle it in a very straightforward manner. Any toy grabbing means immediate removal of that toy from play for the day, unless that would excessively harm the wronged party if there is a clear ...


5

Developmentally they're at the age where sharing is an alien thing, so what you're seeing isn't necessarily a bellweather for problems down the road. That being said, the best luck we've had teaching our 21-month-old to share is modelling the desired behavior. When he picks up something that's interesting to him but that we'd rather he didn't play with (...


4

Talk to the husband. You might talk to your friend first to see how she feels about you talking to her husband. She may even suggest a three-way conversation. It's his daughter now. And it's his wife. Any destabilization caused by yourself is just creating drama for the people you love--which is kind of selfish. It's just the way it is.


4

I have twins who are 2.5 years old. At 18 months consider having the kids take turns with a toy and not play with it at the same time (another form of sharing). First it's Sam's turn and then it's Alex's. You can use a timer so after 2 minutes they have to switch toys. Be very encouraging, thanking them for sharing and playing nicely together. At this ...


4

It depends on the social maturity of the child, as well as with the game. If the child is very social and will likely be playing the game with a lot of -different- people, then I would say yes. If child is able to express themselves in a very unique and personal way, then again yes. But if the child is going to be playing the game with the same couple ...


4

I don't see that pregnancy can make a baby jealous like this. I'm not an expert, but children do become clingy for many reasons or for none at all. My only suggestion is starting small: tell her you will put her down (possibly in a play pen with toys or something) for a couple of minutes, and then give her a big hug. Then repeat. If that works then start ...


3

That is indeed very concerning behavior and should be dealt with It's probably (and hopefully) an attempt for her get attention. If she doesn't get, she may turn it up until she gets it and the last thing you want is further escalation, so ignoring this is not a good option. You need to align with your husband on what to do and do it both consistently. You ...


3

Spend one-on-one time with your daughter, as much as you can. Important now, while the sibling is still on his/her way, but critical once he/she gets here. Also, find ways to include her in the day-to-day care of her new sibling. Can she fetch wipes/diapers/bibs? Would she want to help feed, when bottles are appropriate? Maybe she can do some ...


2

Jealousy is natural tendency we find among infants and babies. You simply cannot help it and it goes with the time. Have you ever seen two grown up twins fighting over a morsel to eat first? Don't worry, this will go as they grow. As of now, if alternating spoon-feeding has not worked, for a period being, you can treat/feed them separately. You take one of ...


2

We have a similar set of boys (3 and 15 months), and the way we dealt with it, in addition to largely following Ida's advice above, was to emphasize to the older boy that the younger boy needs toys, also. Largely this comes in two flavors: The older boy is playing with a large set of toys (cars, trains, etc.), where there are numerous individual elements. ...


2

I get the impression he felt slightly replaced. Were you told this explicitly? If not, then probably it isn't as much of an issue as you think and a quiet word with your friend is appropriate (if it is an issue she will know). If so, then there is an issue and you should ask the father to explain how he really feels. If you both love the child then there ...


1

This sounds like something a behavioural interventionist or therapist should be handling directly since this is pretty extreme behaviour. This is definitely beyond the scope of the average person, so don't feel bad if you're not sure what to do or are overwhelmed. Intervention for Conduct Disorder (not necessarily what his deal is, however) in children is ...


1

This may be a difficult situation to manage, but it will help if you take opportunities to mention the father to the girl, and make it clear to her that her father's desires for her take precedence over yours. For example, if he tells her to do something while you are present and she doesn't do it immediately, you could wait and say, "we can play after you ...


1

Sounds to me that you have two kids that are two years old going on twenty months. And what I mean by that is that it sounds like they are getting an early start on the "Terrible Twos". It's a perfectly normal stage where children start to become a little more independent and want control over their lives. And they protest loudly when they don't get it. ...


1

I see no reason you can't give a game that requires multiple participants to a birthday child. Just because birthday child will have to find someone to play the game with them for it to be fun in no way takes away from the present being for them. I remember as a kid having some games that were mine (twister) and my sister had some games that were hers (...


1

I agree with Valkyrie. To add a technique, tho, you could also try sitting and playing with one or the both of them a few times. Emphasize when you're giving stuff to them. Emphasize when you don't want them taking the knives that you're playing with at that particular moment, especially when there's other knives on the floor between you just itching to be ...


1

Meg Coates knocked it out of the park. One thing I'd do is schedule some one-on-one time with her as much as you can. My 3-yr-old spent the first few weeks after her brother came home telling me "I don't love you." Translation: I'm jealous and can't really express it. Some Mommy-Daughter and Daddy-Daughter dates fixed that right up.


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