11

I think it's unrealistic to expect a 2 year old to be able to play by themselves for a long time. Some might, but not all. We tried the "cry it out" technique tonight but we know it'll take more than one instance to break this behavior. Is there a better approach than "cry it out" to break our son of this habit? Wanting to be with his parents ...


9

This is a difficult situation you're in. At 16 it is reasonable to be allowed a certain degree of independence, and sometimes it can be very difficult for parents to give you that independence. 1) Compromise The best place to start is to look for an area of compromise. You need to get out the house, so if you can think of a hobby or volunteer opportunity ...


7

In short you cannot make her do it. You can tell her whenever you see her with it undone but is this really worth it if all it causes is an argument or you getting annoyed when she won’t listen? And besides, when you are not around you cannot make her. The best way, I believe, to teach her why it’s important to do it up is to try and develop some kind of ...


6

My parents were fairly strict, although not quite as strict as you've described. I wasn't allowed to date at all until I was 16, and then only group dates. I had a strict curfew, and they always had to know who I was with, where I was going, and when I would be back. If any of those plans changed, I had to call first. I was expected to reserve Sundays all ...


6

I offer up this answer with some reluctance, because having read Stacey's answer, I think hers goes in the same direction, but is much better. But since I wrote it, I guess I can as well share it. Please don't say "that I have to live with it" I'm sorry, but I think you will have to. Your options are severely limited. Once you reach the age of majority,...


4

Your son wants interaction because you're the two people in the world that he cares most about. It is often boring playing on his own, and he isn't getting as much positive feedback by himself — he doesn't know if the thing he's done is worthwhile. There is no silver bullet to address anything with children because every child is different, and every child ...


3

Toddlers are very social. We also had difficulties cooking while the children wanted to be with us. Having lots of toys and books helped somewhat. Another big help was a toy kitchen with a toy stove, sink and countertop. This, plus a set of toy plastic dishes and metal cookware and a set of plastic fruits and veggies occupied our children while we cooked. ...


2

What I'm doing is I keep doing whatever I want, but put the boy near me. And then I speak and explain in loud what I'm doing. "Opening eggs, mixing, boiling..." Then, he is with me. Learn to speak, to listen, I'm more focused on what I'm doing, and on him.


2

To mould children after fifteen is an uphill task, anyways. And as a parent you are sometimes caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to how much pressure you should put on your young adult and where you should let it loose. A whole lot of wrong beliefs have already piled up in your child and they are misguiding him today. Therefore it is best ...


2

Anecdotal: we newer got our child to play independently when we are around but grandma did. She would give him a wooden train set to play with. Then she would play with him for a while and show him how to and then tell him she would go and cook. The cooking happened around the corner in the same room. I think it was a combination of 1) the interesting toy ...


1

Is there any chance you could excel at your schoolwork or extracurricular activities? This might lead to an offer to attend a prestigious university that's far from home, perhaps even in another country. If your parents value education highly, they might support you in attending a university away from home. Even if you're not a stellar student now, if you ...


1

First off, I want to validate your feelings regarding this. From your description, it seems your parents are doing you a big disservice. If they came here for advice, I would tell them that as well. But they're not the ones reaching out, you are. So at the end of the day, it's you who are going to have to face your parents with this. And from your ...


1

Pick a single aspect. Pick a small one that can be well defined. Explain the problem that you have with his behaviour. Pick one that has a natural consequence if he fails to do it. Let him fail. Do NOT rescue him. Example: He never starts his essays until the night before they are due, and he comes to his parents saying, "how do I do this?" You can tell ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible