24

(What is it with toddlers and hot air balloons? Mine can't stand them either -- I think the floating blows his mind... what's holding it up in the air?!?) We frame the holiday in terms of playing pretend: "you get to dress-up and pretend you are something else!" I try to only have mildly scary things around, and also teach him it can be fun to be a little ...


14

The main thing is to be creative and 'declare it to be perfect'. For example i dressed up my son around that age as a dinosaur. I took some old green sweatpants, filled 1 leg with paper, the other leg around his waist and that was his tail the same thing with a famous composer or a historical person. You could make the 'perfect Mozart wig' by just taking a ...


11

At that age, I think costumes are entirely for the parents to enjoy :) The kids (and someday their children) can't enjoy until a much older age when they see photographs of how adorable they looked. Cute pumpkin and princess costumes sound perfect. The only thing I'd note is that you should consider safety issues: avoid excessive ribbons, sparkles, buttons, ...


7

At that age it is pretty much irrelevant what your baby may want to become. It is not a concept they will know or have. They have no idea what a witch is, or a mummy, or a zombie. The important thing is for you, your family and friends to have fun, and perhaps have something you can look back on in future and see that the babies looked cute/funny/whatever ...


6

My oldest child was 4 the first time she went trick or treating. When she was 3, she stayed in with me and gave out the candy. She got the leftovers from the bowl when it is over. That was enough excitement for her and got her used to the idea. The next year, she went out with her younger brother (with Dad as escort). I never took my kids into those ...


5

my style has been to explain that there's really no such thing as ghosts or monsters, they're just stories and toys I think you're already doing it right. My wife's preference is to not even bother with theory, and just frame things in practical ways he understands: "The ghost lives in the shop with his ghost friends. It doesn't like sunlight and it's ...


4

Three year olds are definitely old enough to understand 'real' versus 'imaginary/pretend'. My three year old has nightmares where a plane flies into his room fairly regularly; after the first few, I explained to him that it wasn't real, because a real plane can't fit in his room, and he clearly understands that now. Still has nightmares, but has a very ...


4

I think this depends on the age of the child, to some extent. I have two toddler/preschool aged kids, and for us rationing from a common bowl on top of the fridge works perfectly: they can't steal extras, and there's only one bowl so no arguing over 'better candy'. However, once they're a bit older (and probably not much), I think rationing is the wrong ...


2

There are two ways we've handled halloween specifically. The first is that you are in control of the nights activities. You can limit the number of houses they go to while acquiring their bounty. Just watch how full those bags get and when they are close to the limit, let the kids know they have "2 more houses". Then take them home or do a different ...


2

Our six year old daughter put on a Darth Vader costume, with mask, early in the month, and it completely freaked our two year old son out. She'd lift the mask up and he'd be fine, she'd put it down and he'd freak out again. We talked about how it was really her under there, and she was just pretending, but he had none of it. After a few minutes of this, ...


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