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44

This weird stage is really common, and mostly developmental-- something that most babies will naturally outgrow. It's upsetting and gross, but not harmful. The baby won't actually choke or cause injury by occasionally over inserting fingers in the mouth. My son did it for a couple weeks at about that age, and it's recently had a brief resurgence (age 2)....


14

At 10 months some children begin to understand the word no, but many child development theorists, parenting coaches, and other "experts" in the field of caring for and raising children recommend limiting it's use. Here is one perspective on not saying no which suggests common techniques to use instead. A major tactic to use is rephrasing. For example ...


14

In addition to @Balanced Mama's answer, you can also start a conversation: "I notice you often forget to flush the toilet. It really bugs me because it's gross when I have to use the bathroom. So this is not working for me. What would help you remember?" Have him brainstorm. Maybe he wants to make a 'remember to flush' sign for example. FYI, "the softer ...


13

Yes, this is normal and yes, in large part it will take care of itself (but you might even revisit it again when he is between ten and 13 during the pre-adolescent stage too. To improve the situation, keep doing what you are doing. Also, NEVER flush for him (unless he is going to be gone for a few more hours). If you go in to use the bathroom yourself and ...


13

My 4-year-old son has recently discovered the joys of farting, though we haven't had any embarrassing farting scenes in public yet. There is no middle-ground for 4-year-olds. It's sort of an all or nothing kind of thing which means either she's going to hold it in or it's probably going to be loud. It might be worth it to try teaching her to excuse ...


12

I see two scenarios here. With most kids: A: And then for dessert, what do you think we should serve? B: I was thinking some-- B's child: MOM! MOM! Look! This book goes in the bucket! This is interrupting. There are lots of ways to deal with it. I liked to make physical contact - hand on arm or leg, or around waist - and eye contact and say "I'm having ...


12

Absolutely. What you're seeing is entirely normal in babies, particularly around 3+ months old. Among other things, he might be beginning to teethe; both of those things are associated with teething. Drooling is associated with basically everything for many babies, and sucking on fingers (or thumbs or other things) is also very normal. If the drooling is ...


11

A 10-month-old is limited in his understanding of "no" and I would tend to agree with you that hearing it used loudly is probably negative and hearing it often is probably confusing. You might try a softer approach - when he reaches for something he should not, say No in a gentle but firm voice, and pick him up and move him to a more appropriate spot or hand ...


10

As an adult who does the same thing, I don't think it's anything to worry about. If they aren't already involved in playing a musical instrument or some type of singing outlet you could find a local option to help them get the music out. I know in my case it's that I really love music and find myself thinking about songs I enjoy or sometimes am noodling a ...


10

This sounds like pretty normal 15 month old "GOOD LORD I CAN MOVE MYSELF THIS IS AWESOME", but if it's truly looking out of control, you might want to consider talking to your paediatrician, just as a check. I think we do have a few questions on hyperactivity on the site. As far as the reading goes, children generally want to mimic their parents. My ...


10

A 15 month old not only cannot read, but doesn't yet know that those black marks on the paper are words, or that what you are saying is somehow controlled by what is on the paper. This is something they need to learn, and they learn it in modern society through picture-only, no-text books. These are typically heavy cardboard so the toddler doesn't wreck them ...


10

Fifteen months is early even for 100% picture books. It's far too early for understanding a storyline - it's too early for the level of imagination capable of understanding that there could be such a thing as a story. Most fifteen month olds aren't interested in books except as a very short and quick interaction with daddy/mommy. They probably aren't ...


10

Pointing is really the first way kids start to express their wants other than crying, so this is exciting for them. They also sometimes just want to know what something is. I find that the most important thing you can do is to communicate that you understood her. I find it useful to communicate back with words to my 15 months old, such as : Yes, that ...


10

One of my nephews used to do that, more because he loved the way everybody paid attention to him when he did it than because he thought it was fun to choke himself :( Distraction was the key to eliminating the behavior. Teach him that he can get attention with other behaviors. Putting something interesting in his hands will give him something else to ...


9

When our kids interrupt a conversation, one of us squats down to eye level, places a hand on each side of the child's face, and says, "Is it urgent?" (If not) "Please let us finish and you will have my attention." Then we try to wind things up and get back down to eye level and listen to the child. The hands-on-the-face thing has become a bit of shorthand ...


9

I believe most kids around that age (ours included) think farts are a joy to be shared with everyone. The main thing we've focused on so far is that "farting is normal", and to make sure to say "excuse me" afterwards. Generally, the amount of laughter and attention he gives to it relates to how much laughter and attention we, his parents, have recently ...


9

It is highly unlikely that this will do any damage at all, any more than, say, if one developed the habit of tucking their thumbs slightly into the folded fingers instead of over them when making a loose fist. The purpose of the toes is to help us balance on our feet and to aid in pushing off while walking, which has to be done with the toes flat on the ...


9

I would add to EmandM's excellent answer that 3 is old enough to begin to learn about other people's bodily boundaries, and in general that one does not touch others in a way (or at a time) that is unwanted. You can tell him, "I don't want to play this way right now. Please give me some space!" You can also redirect to a type of touch or a time that IS ...


8

What works for us is large pencils. There are pencils that are about double or so the normal diameter of a pencil; they're easier for smaller children to hold and control, with less developed fine motor control. Some even will have a slightly different shape (triangular). Ultimately the problem isn't how dark the lines are, but that it's simply hard to ...


7

At 18 months she can understand that it is not alright to throw things, but only if you're consistent. If throwing is not allowed in the house then it is not allowed in the house, no exceptions. If it is allowed in the house then you'll have to accept that you've given approval for broad categories of objects to be thrown since her categorization skills ...


7

My 7 year old was recently diagnosed with ADD and this was actually a question on his assessment and yes, he hums all the time! He has done this since he could talk and honestly, it drives me up the wall but according to his psychiatrist, it is a way for kids with ADD to keep themselves "busy" and they really do not even realize they are doing it.


7

My concern would be tooth decay- bread might not be sweet, but it's chock full of carbohydrates and for sure prolonged exposure to food right before bed (and without tooth brushing afterward) is a host for cavity-causing bacteria. "Tooth decay is caused by acid-producing bacteria in your mouth that feast on carbohydrates, be it sugar from candy or ...


7

It sounds like he's looking for your attention, which is normal and natural in a small child. He wants to know that he's loved and wanted by you. If you are not enjoying this particular attention seeking behaviour, give him attention in a more manageable way. Play games with him, let him help with tasks around the house, do activities with him directly. ...


6

I'd like to add that by telling her it's not "lady-like" perpetuates the idea that it's ok for boys, not for girls. Historically, seixist cultivation in small children is due in part to physical restrictions for girls, such as not letting girls be loud, run about, or pass gas with out reprehention.


6

First off, don't treat truth telling as a special event, ie. something that deserves rewards beyond a simple "thank you for being honest". Telling the truth should be normal, expected behavior. If truth telling becomes something that is motivated by rewards, it will only last as long as the rewards do or as long as the rewards are sufficient motivators. (...


6

This depends on the child's personality and the level of difficulty of the books he's reading. It may well be that he's excited (or bored) and wants to get to the good parts, or that the book can really be read and understood while skipping some of the fine details. Although you don't read that way, I would be willing to bet that if asked exactly what ...


5

I would just follow through more and not accept the "I'll remember next time" as an answer. "Well, clearly that's not working. So let's try something new. What would help you remember?" You could offer up some solutions, and let her pick one. Try it for a week. If it's not working, back to the drawing board. And, when she's agreed to do something, like if ...


5

Is there a reason you want to overcome this? Is it a medical necessity? Is it harming him in anyway? It seems that it is just a way for him to cope, which can be a good thing. Unless there is some harm to the child, I don't see why you would want to fix this. Having said that, if it is really concerning you, offer him another way to cope. This could be ...


5

We had a similar problem with my son at about that age. Like Morah suggested, I took the option of watching him like a hawk while he was eating and stopping him if I saw he was putting too much food in his mouth. I would hold his hand and simply say, "Chew and swallow". And after he did that, I would release his hand and he could continue eating. He ...


5

I encouraged this in my daughter. If the content's not inappropriate, and the kid is not interrupting about something unrelated, then why shouldn't they participate in a discussion? I found that my 4 year old had opinions pretty much as sound as other random yobbos on the issues of the day. Heck, often her more "naive" questions were the best ones to make ...


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