Hot answers tagged

114

If the child really enjoys the game, what you need to do is not making him stop playing it. Teaching kids that they're not supposed to win at things, or play things they are good at, is just as bad as teaching them they can win anything they try. The problem with letting them win is that it skews their idea of how good they are, and how much opposition they ...


86

At 15 months old, a rubik's cube would not be appropriate. First, it's kind of a complex puzzle. Most adults can't solve it. A 15 month old is going to see it as a brightly colored cube and nothing more. She will get entertainment value out of it by probably trying throw it or eat it (the stickers aren't good to eat and the individual block pieces are ...


59

First, setting some baselines. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends limited, but not zero, screen time for most children above 2. Under 2, and in particular under 18 months, no screen time other than video chat (Facetime/Skype/etc.). For children younger than 18 months, avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting. Parents of children 18 ...


52

I would not recommend this as a toy, but for a different reason. As a brightly colored geometric shape a Rubik's cube would probably be appealing to small children, and at that age they will likely try to put it in their mouths. Many cubes can be dismantled into separate pieces, which could be small enough to be swallowed. Also, some cubes use colored ...


28

There are huge soft 2x2 rubik's cubes for toddlers. Like this one: Jumbo 12157 - Rubik's Baby - My first Cube, Kleinkindspielzeug They are soft and not easily breakable. There is a youtuber called "redkb" who gave one these as a present to his nephew if I remember correctly for his 2nd birthday. So maybe that could be an alternative for you?


23

My experience with this (and a 7 and 5 year old child) is that you should not let the child win, but rather adjust the scenario so that the child can win. This ensures there is still a sense of accomplishment in the win, and still requires the child to challenge themselves. I run with my older son from time to time, and as a fairly fast runner myself I ...


18

I would suggest teaching the child the concept of handicapping. An approach I've found helpful with some other games is to say that every time someone wins, they have to start with one more card [or do something to make things more difficult] in the next game; if they lose, they get to start with one fewer card. After awhile, each player will be winning ...


16

There is this German psychiatrist, Prof. Manfred Spitzer, who aggregates research with regards to children and digital device usage, and, inspired by the findings, has written a book of how, he claims, smart phone usage "makes children dumb" (by negatively impacting the developing brain). His angle is basically that, during developmental phase (and he means ...


14

I have also noticed that young children are remarkably good at Memory games, although 95% of wins against adults is very impressive. A small trick (beside concentration) can improve your results though: instead of displaying all the card in a messy way on the table, dispose them in regular rows and files. Your adult brain often works with tables and grids, ...


14

One reason it's hard to use age indicators to chose an appropriate game for very young children is that their development at that age is so rapid. If you think of the capabilities of a child on their 3rd birthday compared to what they can do just before turning 4, it's a pretty dramatic difference. Additionally, kids develop at such different rates that ...


8

"Winner Cleans Up" has been a surprisingly effective rule for us. Whoever wins needs to put away the cards/board/ball etc. That takes some of the sting out for the loser and really cuts down on gloating. The US has a bit of a cultural obsession with winning so creating a rule that actually creates a downside to winning can help creating a more balanced view....


8

No, at 15 months this doesn't make sense. I'd recommend a book with little flaps that show pictures underneath. These are fun for kids that age. Pick a book that shows colors, numbers, animals, etc. Activity books that ask the kid to find objects in the picture are also appropriate. That way parents can say "where is the horse?" and kids learn the words ...


8

On average, kids need to win about 1 in 3 times in order to stay interested in a game. They must win fairly, not by default. It sounds like she is well on her way to becoming a ranked player - she is strong enough as a player now to recognize when a much stronger opponent is throwing a game. She is not ready to play you, but she needs more advanced players ...


7

My children are still younger and terrified of anything remotely exciting, as stories go, so we often have this conversation, that some people like sad stories, some people enjoy suspense, while others may just want to be amused. It's all entertainment and we'll have to accept that there are genres that aren't for us. I think that's all that needs to be said ...


6

Other than reading, these ideas might help. If you Google calming games for young children You'll find many ideas -- like these. Here is how to make your own sensory bottles Calming scents like lavender, can be used in rice or water or play dough. Playing quietly with these materials can be calming. Pouring from one container to another calms many young ...


6

Tell her you miss playing Chess with her, which you obviously do, and offer to teach her some new strategies while you play. You might have to give up some of your key moves, but your games would take on a new meaning. Instead of her just trying to beat you, perhaps she could start to guess which strategy you are using, and learn the appropriate ...


5

You should not feel that you have to be supplying all of her entertainment. Between daycare and the home life you have described it sounds like your daughter never has to find her own entertainment. This is not something you want to encourage, rather she should be encouraged to learn how to entertain herself and be comfortable with her own company. This ...


5

It's quite normal. Don't worry about it and concentrate on the process of playing the game, and if he wins point out what he did well and could have improved on (in that order) and exactly the same if he loses. It's an important social skill to learn. Fixing games I personally found to be counter-productive. My eldest started saying things like "It's my ...


5

Appropriate? I'd say it's safe, has no small elements, isn't a choking hazard, is made of plastic and powered by low-voltage batteries, so even tasting it won't hurt. But should you buy one for your toddler? I'd say no. Consult these two articles from babycenter: tv watching guidlines for toddlers video games and toddlers While I understand what you want ...


5

What a great opportunity to teach communication and compromise. I would separate the kids into those who want to play by the rules and those who want to create their own game. Or play with official rules one time then made up rules next time. Who cares as long as everyone is having fun. I think saying "We will only ever play this game by the rules as ...


5

It's not that technology itself is bad for children, but, if not content-regulated, it can serve inappropriate content (think 4chan) and, if not time-regulated, it can take time away from learning other important skills. Technology can also serve up stuff that's...not so useful to a child's development, if not necessarily completely unsuitable (think video-...


5

First off, the "age rating" on the box is sometimes, but not always, useful. Sometimes it is related to what kinds of testing they have done; many games have fairly high ratings (13+) due to the need to test games marketed to children below that age for various safety things (such as lead content); see for example this page that goes into some ...


4

Tv is not an answer. At this age the amount of TV should be very, very limited - 1 to 2 hours according to American Academy of Pediatrics - but I'd say that 1h is absolute maximum, seeing how my girl is hooked to tv, watching it with open mount and a thoughtless impression. As for other activties - here are some ideas: Our daughter loves playing with ...


4

As I go for work i will be busy in my work after reaching home. When I get time I spend the whole day with my DS. I just find it hard for the activities but I go online for the activities so that I can engage my kid and has lot of fun. I would like to share few of the activities that i do with my son. I use to play Indoor basket ball: This one of the best ...


4

I have two kids with this problem, and one kid with the opposite problem: he doesn't care enough about winning to learn to play better. You don't want that problem either. For one of the kids who hates losing, letting him play games against a computer seems to work better; he doesn't get upset when he loses to a computer the way he does when he loses to a ...


4

Suggestions based on my experience: Drive at night. We did several similar length trips (Chicago-DC, Chicago-west of Denver) with a 2.5 year old, and the best luck we had was driving overnight. Leave at 3pm, arrive at 9am, or whatever, kids sleep 80% of the trip. They're happy, you're tired but hopefully have someone to help at the destination. If he's ...


4

Try to find cooperative games (Red October, Forbidden Island for examples) or purely random games. In the first case, everyone lose or win together. In the second case, win or loss are purely random and it's easier to accept. You might have to explain the working of the game beforehand to defuse the anger targeted at the other players, and teach your kid ...


4

He's good at it, so make the game more difficult to grow that part of his brain. He'll still beat you, but he'll like the challenge. Find a bigger set with more pairs, or different symbols, or both. Anything at your local car boot sale for that ?


4

There is a middle ground between "letting your kid win" and "giving it all you've got". Let me make an analogy to basketball. If I go outside and play basketball against an 8 year old, just based on size and strength, I could easily beat him every time, block every shot of his, out run him to every loose ball, etc. This would make the game not very fun ...


4

It's been a long time since the question was posted, but just in case this is useful to anyone: Very interesting question! I have no parenting experience nor any intention to have it soon (by the way. I joined this community only to answer your question), but I've been a chess coach for years and you may want this alternative perspective. Your daughter is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible