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114

If the child really enjoys the game, what you need to do is not making him stop playing it. Teaching kids that they're not supposed to win at things, or play things they are good at, is just as bad as teaching them they can win anything they try. The problem with letting them win is that it skews their idea of how good they are, and how much opposition they ...


109

What makes a children's game a children's game is the element of chance generally greatly outweighing the element of strategy. In other words, it doesn't take much for a child to win legitimately. I recently had the exact opposite experience as yours with my five year-old son. He got a new game for Christmas where you flip over two cards to find a match. ...


83

At 15 months old, a rubik's cube would not be appropriate. First, it's kind of a complex puzzle. Most adults can't solve it. A 15 month old is going to see it as a brightly colored cube and nothing more. She will get entertainment value out of it by probably trying throw it or eat it (the stickers aren't good to eat and the individual block pieces are ...


58

First, setting some baselines. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends limited, but not zero, screen time for most children above 2. Under 2, and in particular under 18 months, no screen time other than video chat (Facetime/Skype/etc.). For children younger than 18 months, avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting. Parents of children 18 ...


47

I would not recommend this as a toy, but for a different reason. As a brightly colored geometric shape a Rubik's cube would probably be appealing to small children, and at that age they will likely try to put it in their mouths. Many cubes can be dismantled into separate pieces, which could be small enough to be swallowed. Also, some cubes use colored ...


37

Just anecdata: we did this with our daughter (now 4.5), mostly because playing games about math was fun for all. We thought it would make it more fun for her, and get her more involved, if she won. Now we're reaping the whirlwind; she pouts and refuses to play games when she loses. So now we're having to undo the damage we did, and teach her that playing ...


29

This raises the deeper question of: to what extent to you fabricate a phony reality for small children and until what age? If there isn't a need to protect the child from anything in the given situation, it's probably better to stick to reality. That a game can be lost is not some "harsh dose of reality" that must be revealed gradually, because the child'...


26

There are huge soft 2x2 rubik's cubes for toddlers. Like this one: Jumbo 12157 - Rubik's Baby - My first Cube, Kleinkindspielzeug They are soft and not easily breakable. There is a youtuber called "redkb" who gave one these as a present to his nephew if I remember correctly for his 2nd birthday. So maybe that could be an alternative for you?


23

My guess is that she has memorized the number sequence, but hasn't actually made the correlation between the words and the actual amount of things. This a big leap. Have her practice counting as much as you can, but make it fun and incorporated into daily life as much as possible. Like, when giving snacks "here's one slice of orange, now you have two orange ...


23

My experience with this (and a 7 and 5 year old child) is that you should not let the child win, but rather adjust the scenario so that the child can win. This ensures there is still a sense of accomplishment in the win, and still requires the child to challenge themselves. I run with my older son from time to time, and as a fairly fast runner myself I ...


18

I would suggest teaching the child the concept of handicapping. An approach I've found helpful with some other games is to say that every time someone wins, they have to start with one more card [or do something to make things more difficult] in the next game; if they lose, they get to start with one fewer card. After awhile, each player will be winning ...


16

There is this German psychiatrist, Prof. Manfred Spitzer, who aggregates research with regards to children and digital device usage, and, inspired by the findings, has written a book of how, he claims, smart phone usage "makes children dumb" (by negatively impacting the developing brain). His angle is basically that, during developmental phase (and he means ...


15

I really like this answer and voted for it but wanted to offer up a few More ideas on the matter along the same lines. Since he is two, if he does have an evening where he is just having a frustratingly unlucky night, occasionally stacking the deck to help regain the fun, won't hurt him any. Doing it all the time does set him up with unrealistic ...


14

I have also noticed that young children are remarkably good at Memory games, although 95% of wins against adults is very impressive. A small trick (beside concentration) can improve your results though: instead of displaying all the card in a messy way on the table, dispose them in regular rows and files. Your adult brain often works with tables and grids, ...


10

We play simple card games (like Uno for kids) with our 3yo, and we let the cards decide without cheating. Sometimes I win, sometimes he wins. I cheer for him when he wins (but I don't praise, that's something else). I cheer for me when I win. Regardless who wins, the victory is briefly celebrated as the end of a fun game, and then we move on: play another ...


8

"Winner Cleans Up" has been a surprisingly effective rule for us. Whoever wins needs to put away the cards/board/ball etc. That takes some of the sting out for the loser and really cuts down on gloating. The US has a bit of a cultural obsession with winning so creating a rule that actually creates a downside to winning can help creating a more balanced view....


8

On average, kids need to win about 1 in 3 times in order to stay interested in a game. They must win fairly, not by default. It sounds like she is well on her way to becoming a ranked player - she is strong enough as a player now to recognize when a much stronger opponent is throwing a game. She is not ready to play you, but she needs more advanced players ...


7

Board and card games are a great activity idea. I think that 5 is old enough to be able to handle moderately complicated rules, but (more importantly) old enough to keep track of what rules apply to which game. Indeed, the variation of many new games probably helps memory and strategy skills, since she has to keep things straight! The trick is to balance ...


7

I don't advocate just letting your child win. However, it is entirely appropriate to adjust your level of play according to the age and abilities of the child. When playing sports against my kids, I don't let them win, but I don't go all out against them like I would against other adults my age as that wouldn't really be fun for either of us.


7

No, at 15 months this doesn't make sense. I'd recommend a book with little flaps that show pictures underneath. These are fun for kids that age. Pick a book that shows colors, numbers, animals, etc. Activity books that ask the kid to find objects in the picture are also appropriate. That way parents can say "where is the horse?" and kids learn the words ...


6

Other than reading, these ideas might help. If you Google calming games for young children You'll find many ideas -- like these. Here is how to make your own sensory bottles Calming scents like lavender, can be used in rice or water or play dough. Playing quietly with these materials can be calming. Pouring from one container to another calms many young ...


6

Tell her you miss playing Chess with her, which you obviously do, and offer to teach her some new strategies while you play. You might have to give up some of your key moves, but your games would take on a new meaning. Instead of her just trying to beat you, perhaps she could start to guess which strategy you are using, and learn the appropriate ...


5

I haven't read the book, but I would guess "clap hands" is just clapping the baby's hands or clapping your hands to the baby's hands, with or without music. I think hidey peep is when a child hides behind something or under a blanket, similar to peekaboo, but not using hands to cover eyes (search hidey peep on YouTube for a few examples). I'd think ...


5

I expect that at this age your son doesn't really care about winning... and this is exactly the reason why it's a good moment to introduce losing! It could save him (and you) a lot of anguish later when he begins to care, because you (or his friends) will have to introduce losing at some point.


5

In my experience, typical parties for this kind of age group are 2 hours - I think you may find 3 hours too much. The normal format is something along the lines of: Games - 30 mins Organised entertainer (magician, puppet show, etc) if relevant - 30 mins Food - 30 mins Games - 30 mins If you're not doing an organised entertainer then extend the games a bit ...


5

I think this is a great question. My oldest is 4 (5 this week, actually) and he's gotten to the point where winning is important to him. So we're having to deal with this situation now where he's learning to lose gracefully. It's a process. I've never intentionally let him win at games or anything, although my husband will sometimes "race" him up the ...


5

Appropriate? I'd say it's safe, has no small elements, isn't a choking hazard, is made of plastic and powered by low-voltage batteries, so even tasting it won't hurt. But should you buy one for your toddler? I'd say no. Consult these two articles from babycenter: tv watching guidlines for toddlers video games and toddlers While I understand what you want ...


5

You should not feel that you have to be supplying all of her entertainment. Between daycare and the home life you have described it sounds like your daughter never has to find her own entertainment. This is not something you want to encourage, rather she should be encouraged to learn how to entertain herself and be comfortable with her own company. This ...


5

It's quite normal. Don't worry about it and concentrate on the process of playing the game, and if he wins point out what he did well and could have improved on (in that order) and exactly the same if he loses. It's an important social skill to learn. Fixing games I personally found to be counter-productive. My eldest started saying things like "It's my ...


5

What a great opportunity to teach communication and compromise. I would separate the kids into those who want to play by the rules and those who want to create their own game. Or play with official rules one time then made up rules next time. Who cares as long as everyone is having fun. I think saying "We will only ever play this game by the rules as ...


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