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17

Your body will (except in very rare cases) produce as much milk as your baby needs. There are several ways of messing with this supply and demand system, though, and one of them is by supplementing with formula. You see, once feeding has been established, your breast will produce as much milk as you empty out of it(empty is not really the right word here, as ...


13

You should be nursing 10-12 times per day in order to make sure your body produces enough milk (the more you nurse, the more it produces) and also to prevent engorgement. Aim for feeding about every 2 hours during the day and every 4 hours at night. You will know if she is taking enough in by how much is coming out the other end. By day 9, a newborn should ...


8

Noah & woliveirajr are both correct that there is some risk of reducing nutritional value, I'm sure. I will offer as counter point my home study (sample size=2) of children who were bottle-fed formula almost exclusively as infants; formula which was on occasion reheated in the microwave. They are now 12 and 9, healthy, and not malnourished. They ...


8

Depending on the formula that you're using, they might have some probiotics in their composition. For example, Nestlé. Probiotics have small tolerance to high temperatures, so preparing the formula (or heating it after it was prepared) above some temperature might kill those probiotics, reducing the nutritional value of the formula. For example, this ...


7

The normal advice for formula is that you should not re-use a bottle that has been partially used, in line with the advice given above. The advice for breastmilk is different (breastmilk naturally has antimicrobial properties) so it is generally considered OK to re-use a bottle of breastmilk. It can be stored at room temperature for up to an hour and in the ...


7

No, this is probably nonsense. Did the people telling you that cite any sources? As you pointed out, any air trapped in the milk will quickly bubble out. If you wait a minute before feeding, there will be very little air left. As to vitamin A, it is true that it is broken down by oxygen, but I don't think a bit of extra air due to shaking will make much of ...


7

You are asking an incredibly broad question when you say "benefits". There are a number of things that can be beneficial in breastfeeding, for the baby and the mother. So how much of a benefit will be obtained varies depending on what you are looking for here. Also, keep in mind that any "reduction" of risks, etc based on breastfeeding is only that. You ...


6

So long as it's only powder and not made up then that's fine. I can say that pretty confidently as when it is manufactured it is turned from a liquid product into powder using a process called spray drying and that even a 'cool' process will be quite a bit hotter than 40 deg! For a walkthrough of the facilities used to produce infant formula, GEA Process ...


6

No, you need not boil the water, especially as your child is already nine months old. The recommendation to always boil is just to be extra safe in reducing bacteria content. Note that even very clean tap or bottled water is not sterile and neither is water that has been boiled for a few minutes. In general the recommendation to wash / boil everything you ...


6

There is no scientific basis to the idea that cold milk would upset a baby's stomach more than warmed milk. Per the CDC: Breast milk does not need to be warmed. It can be served room temperature or cold. However, the CDC recommends to Swirl the breast milk to mix the fat, which may have separated. Cold milk will release less of it's aromatics. For ...


5

My baby wasn't fussy but my wife was. Result, we went through 5 changes of milk in the first 3 months. My wife, naturally wanted the best for out baby. As we live in China, she was worried about the safety of domestic milk brands. We started out with a Dutch brand and she bought two bottles then I pointed out that the milk was form Indonesia and bottled in ...


4

It is almost certain they do not need this bacteria. Have a look at this question on Skeptics. the European Food Safety authority has researched 800 health claims of such companies, and they could not find relationships. There is some evidence that probiotics can help in certain situations, for a small subset of the population, but that is about it.


4

We microwave our infants formula all the time, it's all we use to heat the formula. We always swirl and double-check the temp before feeding. I disagree with the losing nutritional value statement. I don't think that warming milk to 20 degrees celcius is considered "cooking" to anyone. There is a fine line in microwaving time to go from feeding temperature ...


4

It's certainly not illegal, it's just ill-advised. When it comes to your child's safety, is it really worth taking the risk? I believe a better statement would be "During the heating or feeding process, no single part of the bottle or food should ever be hotter than what you would give to your infant". Swirling the formula around to distribute the heat is ...


4

According to the USDA: Storing Infant Formula Store bottles of prepared infant formula in a properly functioning refrigerator until ready to use. Bacterial growth is reduced when infant formula is kept in a refrigerator at temperatures at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. (Use a special thermometer to test if the refrigerator is at the ...


4

If you need a second opinion, please get one from another doctor (preferably as soon as possible so that your baby can get the necessary nutrition without delay.) However, since you asked: Yes, you should supplement his feeding with bottles. There's no shame whatsoever in doing this for any reason, let alone to help your baby grow. To continue exclusively ...


4

it is possible to exclusively breastfeed, and many people do it. However, many people are not able to either. You might not produce enough milk, or there might be other issues. Our second child was exclusively breastfed until 7-8 months, but as I went back to work I could not pump enough milk to keep up. I just don't produce a lot when pumping. Our ...


3

Some answers or comments on this site indicate that due to strict minimum nutrition standards, formulas are all basically the same. The only thing I could possibly come up with is taste, but I guess as long as your infant accepts it and doesn't turn purple, I'd say you're not crazy and any formula goes :)


3

What we did for a few days: I (the father) slept with the baby on a separate bed, with a water bottle ready. When he woke up, I cuddled him and gave him a bit to drink and he would sleep on. The idea is that when the baby smells the (still lactating!) mother, he/she gets hungry. As said, a few days broke the habit and weaning was relativly smooth. Of course,...


3

While I agree with Ida that there's nothing wrong in supplementing with formula, don't be too quick to assume that you have to. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months is possible for most women but believing that you don't have enough milk is a very common worry that leads a lot of women to use formula even though they would prefer not to. Not ...


3

According to the La Leche League it is normal if a breastfed baby is asking for food every 1.5-2 hours. They also mean if the baby generates enough pee and poo (about 4-5 wet diapers and 1-5 poo) and gains weight, then her/his development is normal. Plus, if he is happy as you described, I would assume that he is all right. If you have issues with evening ...


2

Despite what manufacturers would have you believe, most/all formula is essentially the same. At least here in the US, all baby formula must meet a certain set of criteria involving the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals found in the formula. Having said that, constipation is a very individual thing. Different babies will respond to different formulas ...


2

I can't answer your question specifically, but I would disregard any advice that tells you to choose a low-iron formula. I found a blog post that includes links to some studies. The idea is that iron supplementation is constipating, and it may be, but infants need iron to avoid anemia. Iron from supplements is not absorbed as well by the body as it is from ...


2

It is possible to know how much milk your child is getting: Weigh her on a sufficiently-precise scale, feed her, and then weigh her again. The difference between the two weights is the amount of milk she received. Each 0.063 lbs difference equals 1 oz of milk consumed. (In practice, an accurate measurement can be difficult due to squirminess. You might ...


2

If your wife is the one trying to give the formula, your daughter might refuse it because she can smell her mother's milk. You might have to be the one to give the formula and your wife might have to leave the room. Otherwise, dropper or a small (plastic) shotglass (It's how I gave my son expressed milk when we were having latching issues) should do until ...


2

Here's the problem. Your doctor has recommended a particular solution. Anything we recommend would be a second opinion against their recommendation, and taking our advice over a doctor's would be... not good. The best thing to do is to overcome the fussiness. Either mix something you know your child likes into the mash, or instead of egg-yolks, make an ...


2

For us, the only way we could wean our first son (and will soon with our second!) is to stop doing middle of the night feedings. Our 10 month old is mostly weaned off of them, but still sometimes will wake up and ask for some; how we got even this far was simply to stop feeding and rock him to bed. That led to a couple of rough nights, but it doesn't take ...


2

While we were in hospital post-birth, our newborn had jaundice and needed topping up with formula, but we had the midwives come and give us information to let us know what the best thing would be to do. I recommend doing that at your local childbirth centre of choice, but here are the highlights. If for some reason breast alone isn't an option, (e.g. mother ...


2

One possible cause is dairy allergy or a sensitivity to one of the ingredients in that particular formula. You could certainly try switching the formula to a different type (eg: soy based instead of milk based, or use one of the easy to digest/sensitive varieties where the ingredients are essentially partially pre-digested or broken down more. You could also ...


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