Hot answers tagged

17

Pacifiers aren't magic. If something else is bothering a baby, a pacifier only calms them for a short while. This is useful, for example, if you need a baby to calm down for a few minutes while you fix a bottle, but you have to address the underlying need in short order or the baby just spits the pacifier out and gets madder than ever. On plane trips, ...


10

I've actually had to deal with virtually this exact situation a few times over the past year or so. We're in California, my family is in DC (5 hour flight). My son is almost 3, my daughter is 1. As with all things in dealing with small children, it's really a game of distractions. So the best way to prepare is to be well equipped with a full arsenal of ...


8

First off check that it is possible, I know some airplanes have rules about minimum ages for unaccompanied minors, so you may want to check. Also, don't assume you can take them to and pick them up from the gate - I know some airports do not issue gate passes any more. Check with the airports. If you can't you may have to purchase an unaccompanied minor ...


7

If your pregnancy is healthy (uterus size is on target with dates, no bleeding or placental abnormalities on ultrasound, a singleton pregnancy, etc), you should be fine until starting to get close to the due date (where do you want to have your baby, at home or in another city? Or, worse yet, do you want to go into labor on the plane?) Still, it's best to ...


7

@anongoodnurse's answer is great, but I want to add some things from personal observation: I have flown with a baby as young as 4 months, and it was not an issue. The younger the baby is the easier, since they sleep more. I think a 7 week baby will be fine (provided no health issues, not pre-mature and so forth). ask you pediatrician if there is any ...


6

Please note that some airlines will not let you breastfeed on a flight, regardless of what is said when you purchase a ticket. For the first few weeks of a newborn's life, usually the baby's doctor prefers that she be kept in relative isolation (friends and family). Flying is a particular risk because of crowding and recirculated air. After that, it's ...


6

Take option 1. First, let the other passengers waiting know what are doing. Make sure that both parents go to the bathroom. One parent stands outside supplying wipes, a bag for the poopy nappy, etc etc, the other does the dirty work. Make sure you have plenty of wipes, a plastic bag for the nappy, a bag for any clothes that get soiled, a fresh change of ...


5

The first answer post is right on the money. Definitely use the in plane lavatory if your baby #2s during the flight. I found it helpful that I had an extra swaddling blaket to lay down on the changing surface. One of my flights did not have a fold down changing table which made it a little more difficult, but all parents learn to improvise. My advice is to ...


5

Has she ever flown before (post-toddler years)? If not, then that's the first step: fly. I probably fell into the category she falls into for years; I flew only twice as a child that I can remember, at 6 and 10, and so when I went off to college (far enough to have to fly each semester back and forth), I had a mild fear of flying. It only went away when I'...


4

I think your children may be too young to fly unaccompanied so it is best to check that first. I flew several times unaccompanied as a child, but generally before security restrictions prevented people going to the gate. My experience as a younger child was that I was always escorted (walked, driven on a cart, or a series of carts / cars if changing ...


3

I fly a lot, and have done for the last 40 years, and while there is the occasional inconsolable baby, most flights are relatively peaceful. Even crying babies are often soothed, but they usually want cuddles rather than a pacifier, and cuddles can be tricky at takeoff and landing. When my kids were young we found a pacifier or a bottle did help a lot, but ...


3

Pack carefully. Preferably with a cabin bag that has lots of separate, easily-accessible compartments. Don't try to do anything for yourself when the baby is asleep, apart from sleep. My experience is (so far) mostly with a younger child (3-6 months) and while at that age they're less mobile (and therefore generally easier to travel with) one of the biggest ...


2

I do not know how old your kid is, but I had to travel 12 hours with my 2 year old and his mother, and this worked well: -Travel during the night, so the baby is tired and willing to sleep -Make enough activities before the flight to ensure that the baby get tired enough to sleep well -Sometimes you can have sits where there is an extra place to attach a ...


2

Typically, the more you know about something, the less you are afraid by it. No matter how much math, theory and statistics you throw at it, nothing beats actually living the experience of it. EAA Young Eagle Program allows youngster to actually fly in an aircraft with a qualified pilot. http://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/aviation-education-and-resources/eaa-...


2

Check with the airline if it's permissible at all, but also whether they have a process to handle it - typically non-low-cost airlines will provide a staff member to take them from the check in desk to the gate, to ensure they get to the right place. They can then be met on the other end A lot for me would depend on the airport. If they're flying to a small ...


2

Not every baby takes a pacifier. While they may be magical devices for the little ones who will, some simply refuse them. My son has never liked them - he'd take it for less than ten seconds and then kick it out. Additionally, some parents avoid them for their own reasons. Some of these reasons are backed in science, others are not. In general, there are ...


1

To paraphrase the question: Children have an on/off button that stops crying. Children crying on airplanes are annoying. The asker wonders why parents don't use the on off button on airplanes. The answer: The assumption 1. is wrong.


1

No, pacifiers don't always work. Using the pacifier too many times when the baby clearly doesn't want it and you will actually increase the crying. It's usually obvious when the baby doesn't want the pacifier. The baby will open his mouth to drop the pacifier. The baby will wriggle his head out of the way of the pacifier when you try to give it to him a ...


1

How do your children do with unexpected situations? If bad weather causes the flight to be diverted to an airport 50 miles away, how well would they deal with it? For that matter, how well would the person meeting them at the destination handle it?


1

I've known people who did fly with newborns at around this age, and it's certainly possible to do; note the caveats Ida and Anongoodnurse note. I'd add one more, which is why I wouldn't do this. A seven week old still has an underdeveloped immune system. A baby doesn't have a fully functional immune system until around six months, and until three months ...


1

As an airline captain and licensed therapist I have specialized in treating flight phobia for 30 years. The average age of onset is 27 when, as an adult, one faces the fact of being vulnerable and - on ones own - cannot control every threat. When a child develops this problem precousiously it is a clear indication that what Winnicut called "the holding ...


1

We've done it all three ways (#1 and #2 a few times, and fortunately usually #3). In the lavatory is best if it has a table - but make sure you ask which one does, as often only one does from our experience on 737s. In the seat works if you're a fast changer (which I am) with a small baby - but not with a toddler. If it's still breast-milk-only, you are ...


1

From personal experience, the airline toilet isn't impossibly small, although this appears to vary by both aircraft and size of parents (international flights only so far, parents are no more than six feet tall, child is fairly quiescent as she's no older than 6 months on all flights so far). My wife and I manage the process together: she carries the baby ...


1

I have not changed a diaper on a plane, but have changed a diaper in the front seat of a sports car, which I would guess has the same amount of space (and room for error(-; ) I didn't even have the luxury of a sink, and I'm a cloth-diaperer. Here's how I managed with my 7 mo old: 1) Make sure diaper is arranged (not an issue with disposables, but, the point ...


1

Most of the parents find it difficult to how to keep their kids engage in activities. There are few wimple activities were kids can have fun. Make some velco craft sticks. Make an activity binder to take with you Make them to paint Make some craft stick puzzles! You can make them to coloring pages with crayons. As this is one of the best activity were kids ...


1

Stickers. A giant sticker book. Someone gave me this tip for our first flight when my son was 21 months after they had flown international with their son.


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