14

He has been checked to see if there is anything physically causing the problem. By whom? It sounds like it's past time to see a specialist about this, or a different one if you've already seen one. For our daughter (7 right now), we have to use a multi-pronged approach: Controlling liquid intake: No more than a sip or two of water after dinner. Even ...


11

By age 7, the social ramifications of wearing a diaper are huge. This isn't the sort of thing the other kids at his school haven't noticed. If he hasn't started using the toilet after a couple of months around other kids, this isn't just stubbornness or your failure to win out, something is wrong. I've only run across a few cases of children this age who ...


10

It's totally normal Don't worry. Many children do experience setbacks like this. It's totally normal, only to be expected, and almost certainly temporary. Keep calm, don't give a payoff My eldest had this problem when he was 4. Here's what we did. If he wee'd in the night, we just kept everything super calm and changed everything, all the sheets and ...


9

Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


9

My boy was waking up wet a lot older than is typical, and here is what we did. We happened to have some plastic graduated beakers that held about 800 ml and were clearly marked to measure volume. I showed him how to read the volume on them and we kept them in the bathroom. I encouraged him during the day, when he was home and could go to the bathroom ...


8

Aside from some physiological or psychological factor another thing to consider is that during potty training you probably (if you were like us) followed a very specific bedtime routine. No water after x:00pm, pee before bedtime etc. After our now 5 year old was all trained, we started to get a little lax on the routine. Sure you can have a drink, I will ...


7

We had a similar situation. We survived. Most nights are dry now. Let me get the bad news out first: There are a few children that will be bed-wetting until their teens. A few. Very, very few. We had a similar problem and worked closely with our trusted pediatrician. There is one thing to keep in mind: Dry nights are a combination of reduced urine ...


6

My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot.


5

It is certainly not a willful behaviour at this age, especially in the middle of the night. So it won't help to explain your expectations, it will just frustrate her more. Was there any substantial change lately in the child's life? E.g. birth of younger sibling, starting kindergarten / preschool, problems in kindergarten / preschool, mom / dad starting / ...


4

It's good you are looking out for your brother! Hey, tell him don't worry about it... he'll grow out of it someday. Lots of kids do that, and boys are notorious. So, don't worry about, just put some things in place to protect him and the bed, like a protective cover, and some towels, etc. Then, make sure no more fluids after a certain time (depending on ...


4

Have you considered looking into seeing a gastroenterologist? Back before I was diagnosed with Chron's/UC there would be times that I would just be unable to control my bladder. I was able to tell when it was going to happen but there were instances where I wouldn't be able to hold it (even if the bathroom was 20 feet away).


4

First of all night time: A child has no control at night until his body does it for him, so stopping the diapers at night is just going to bother him and you. My 4 year old daughter (girls usually have control at an early age then boys) still needs a diaper at night and the pediatrician says they don't worry about it until age 6 and even then don't do ...


4

If there's no medical reason for the bed wetting I would persist with an alarm style system to wake the child up when they begin to wet the bed. I had the same problem for many years (into my early teens) and went to the doctors frequently but no issues were found, I tried several medicines to no effect. My parents tried most of the tactics regarding ...


4

This is very common. Make sure drinks are done an hour before bedtime and the toilet gets used every night, last thing. Get a waterproof mattress pad and extra sheets, and change them when you need to. It's important that you don't dump a bucket of shame on the kid. She's not doing it on purpose. Try to laugh. This too shall pass.


3

My son was a bed wetter until he was 8 and his father and I split. I mean it stopped as soon as he left. Maybe stress?


2

It really should pass, however I know that the addition of shame can prolong and even make the issue worse. Waking her up with break up her sleep and make her more tired. My experience is that bedwetting is best solved with rewards and celebration of success. Ultimately if it continues to 10+years old there may be trauma that is contributing to the problem....


2

About one in forty children aged 7 will wet the bed at night. This website gives some information about bedwetting, including information about treatments. http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Bedwetting/Pages/Introduction.aspx sweet food could stimulate production of urine while salty food could decrease it. Do not give your seven year old child salty food ...


2

I think some kids just have more difficulty. I have three brothers and one of them wasn't completely accident-free until he was thirteen. Another was dry by the age of seven. My son was about nine when he had his last "accident". All you can do is help your son manage his anxiety, and to understand that no child would willingly pee in his bed just to ...


2

I am going to copy one thing of what Ben said, but specifically leave everything else out. Start making her go to the bathroom every couple of hours. She has to physically go to the bathroom and sit down and give a solid effort to try and 'go'. I played this game with one of my kids (by game I mean irritating back and forth power struggle) so I get the ...


2

There are at least three main factors at work here but first, I would (personally) reframe your Title Question as: "Two Year old, potty trained or not, pees every 20-30 minutes." That's probably the reality, though most people don't really know how often their 2 year old's go because they don't know about a wet diaper until after a few pee's have built up. ...


1

Ask yourself what need your child is satisfying by this behavior, and then see if you can find a way to meet the same demands in a way that is more compatible with your needs to not do an excessive amount of laundry. I think you're onto something regarding attention. My uninformed assumption would be that intimacy and a feeling of being nurtured when you ...


1

My family is going through a lot of the same issues you are. Our 7 yr old son has a bowel obstruction that has made it impossible for him to know when he has to poo, so he goes through a dozen diapers a day due to leakage and his lack of motor skills keep him from cleaning himself properly. Lets start with the Autism, the school system only cares about ...


1

Bed wetting can be a sign of an underlying disease like Diabetes. It can also be due to a bladder problem or something genetic. I'd advise you to see a doctor.


1

So there is a mix of things that can be done and things that are going on. Older children can sometimes bedwet through trauma that's happened to them, for which they will require some therapy to get over. The trauma may not visibly show itself in any other area of their day-to-day lives, however it'll be in their thought life. Also it could be many things ...


1

Some kids just don't realise it when they pee in their sleep. In addition to the plastic sheet, you could stop water intake about an hour or two before bedtime(only IF possible) and insist on a visit to the bathroom before tucking them in. To find out if its anxiety talk to the child in the morning about possible causes by asking about dreams/nightmares ...


1

I read a very interesting article on this topic a while back, unfortunately I haven't been able to locate a link. The thrust of it was that this kind of regression is very common, but it also offered a solid solution. One common reason potty trained children have regression, particularly nighttime regression, is that we tend to overestimate how much we can ...


1

He knows how to call for the potty. At this age, you might need to be more proactive then that. Send him to the bathroom every few hours, instead of waiting for him to tell you he has to go.


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