11

In my opinion Dory is a deeply flawed character. I don't think she is a good role model at all for children, even if something might be learned from the movie. This is not Dory's story. It's not even Nemo's story. It's Marlin's story. This is important, because Dory's function in the narrative exists precisely because she is a counterweight to Marlin. The ...


10

I've actually had to deal with virtually this exact situation a few times over the past year or so. We're in California, my family is in DC (5 hour flight). My son is almost 3, my daughter is 1. As with all things in dealing with small children, it's really a game of distractions. So the best way to prepare is to be well equipped with a full arsenal of ...


10

TL;DR: whenever they're ready, and when you do let them view it, watch it with them and help them find different ways to think about and address the more qustionable/uncomfortable themes. Longer, more nuanced answer: Honestly, the age when they're ready for it depends on the child. My daughter wasn't able to grok anything other than 10-15 minutes of a ...


8

All the main characters are flawed somehow, as with most movies. The question is, how do they overcome their flaws? Children are supposed to observe what should be emulated and what should not based on how things turn out. Marlin and Dory are counterparts. Their flaws balance out. Marlin represents total seriousness and drive, so committed to his mission of ...


8

It really depends on the movie. Our 3 year old loved Cars since he was 2, and was happily watching Planes at 3. He was not interested in Horton Hears a Who - too much dialogue even if the content is age appropriate in my opinion. I would wait a bit with letting him watch The Lion King (too scary) and Bambi (VERY scary). I recommend the site ...


4

Totally normal. At 8, 4, and 3 they probably play well together and really should be doing so as often as they can. Participating when they ask is pretty good but it's also good that they see that you like things yourself and have interests of your own. You can also separate the concept of everyday activity with special occasions. Sure, by the day to day ...


3

A couple quick things to get out of the way Just like every "what is the appropriate age" question, there isn't one. Age is a pretty decent approximation of the physical and emotional maturity of people, but its margin of error is very high. While some things have laws that put lower bounds on them (drinking, violent movies, staying home alone) the ...


2

It depends on the child, the film, and quite a bit of pure chance. My son, who is now nearly four, although he loves Disney films, still finds aspects of many of them scary. Until a few months ago he found the climax of Frozen very scary, but enjoyed the rest of the film. Tangled, which I'd personally rate roughly equally with Frozen on the scariness scale, ...


1

You can try looking at amazon.com for the audiobooks you have and checking the categories they are under adult children teens and then checking out any reviews, as coarse vocabulary is usually mentioned here if it was a surprise.


1

From having played at many festivals, I can offer one amazing child friendly music festival, had and shoulders above the rest: The Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival, held late summer up near Inverness It is designed from the ground up to be family friendly, including child only areas, family and quiet camping, events and tuition for kids (including circus ...


1

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/10915407/Best-family-friendly-festivals.html Latitude - July - Henham Park, Southwold, Suffolk. Camp Bestival - July-August - Lulworth Castle, Dorset. Womad - July - Charlton Park, Malmesbury, Wiltshire. Green Man - August - Crickhowell, Brecon Beacons, Wales. Just So - August - Rode Hall Parkland, Cheshire.


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