5

My son does exactly the same thing. He's 8 now, but at 5-6 did the same as yours. I don't think there's anything wrong with this inherently, but I did have some concerns, so I did a few things. I gave him limits: some cards were somewhat valuable, so I asked him not to give these away. I defined this very carefully (they are put in a binder), so he ...


5

TL;DR: Talk to your child often about their feelings and give them a rich emotional vocabulary/lexicon. Four years of age is a good time to start teaching a child to learn to handle their emotions themselves in socially appropriate ways. As you so poignantly pointed out, many people don't do this. In fact, the majority of adults often don't manage their ...


5

Wikipedia lists the causes of attention-seeking in adults. Excessive parental attention in childhood is not one of them. If anything, I would expect lack of attention to be a cause, as the child becomes desperate for attention and learns that the only way to get attention is to demand it. However this is a complicated issue. It also implies that the way you ...


4

At 8 months, it's possible your son is going to through his stranger anxiety phase where he will be more reserved around new people. Similarly this is where separation anxiety from his primary caregivers is the highest. Even though your son is with his extended family he may not be comfortable with them yet and still views them as strangers. The idea is to ...


2

First, the best way to teach a child to handle his emotions isn't external consequences (i.e., punishment), but taking the time to teach him how to handle his emotions for their own sake. If he's upset and hitting you, taking away his television or making him lose some other privilege won't teach him to handle his emotions properly: it will teach him to ...


2

I think you've done everything right and you've explained the situation to him as well as you can. This is just one in a series of life lessons that your son will learn. It's good that he has learned it so early and in such a harmless way. In order to help take the sting away, you might give him the opportunity to do some task (like helping you clean the ...


1

I agree with your analysis that the lockdown is the likely culprit. I usually read problematic drop offs as a display of affection. He enjoys being with you. If up until now he has accepted these routine separations as inevitable, the lockdown will have shown him that it's not the only way imaginable. Publishing him for wanting to be with you should, I think,...


1

I definitely wouldn't punish him - opinions on punishment in general aside, it would have no impact hours later, and would just add to the stress later on. The key to dropoffs at any age is routine. The reason they got hard is the same: change of routine. Any routine change will cause difficulty for children - some handle it better than others, but it's ...


1

I purchased these emotions flashcards on Amazon. It has the emotion with the opposite feeling on the back. These are great to explain emotions as well as the opposite feeling. In the am, I ask my son how is he feeling and we put the card on the fridge so. he sees it as well as talk about the opposite emotion. I think. its helpful to show that there are ...


1

I have been using this list of feelings for myself and for kids between 5 and 14. It has the advantage of classifying emotions: the list for kids has 6 categories (the four basic ones from the Transactional Analysis strand of psychology, glad, sad, mad, scared, plus shame and digust) and the one for older children or adults has 10 categories (the previous ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible