9

Resist the temptation to allow sugary drinks to solve this problem... you will just trade one problem for another! Keep a selection of frozen fruits on hand to use as ice cubes. When she gets to the bottom of the drink, she has fruit to eat (usually thawed by then) as a treat. She can devise her own concoctions. Water must be handy. Carry water bottles with ...


7

As a first step, don't water down his milk at bed time. That's just giving him extra fluids without nutritional value that won't do much to make him feel full. With straight milk, he will probably consume a bit more calories, but not so much fluid, giving him less need to pee. It may also be a good idea to set a fixed amount you feed him every night. No ...


6

It's almost certainly just experimentation. My son did the same thing at similar age, experimenting with letting drinks or chewed food fall out of his slack mouth, or holding milk in and swishing it around a while before either swallowing or dribbling it out. He would either act as if he didn't notice it was happening, or take a sneaky look at me to see my ...


6

There is a pretty clear link between soda consumption and obesity. See, for example, https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/sugary-drinks-fact-sheet/ Awareness around this link is clearly rising and as a result soda consumption in the US has started to decline http://www.businessinsider.com/americans-are-drinking-less-soda-2016-3 Still, the average ...


5

A very common way to get around this sort of thing is by demonstrating the right behaviours. Buy some water bottles, for all the family (and make sure she gets to choose the style/design for hers) and always have them with you. A really good design she likes may make her happier to have water at school as well. Let her have the flavour of choice (Ribena or ...


4

It would be best to think of sugary drinks like candy - a treat to be enjoyed once in a while. There is no nutritional value in sugary soft drinks, the sugar is just empty calories. Very little nutritional value in sugary fruit juices either. So I'd not forbid them, but I wouldn't routinely stock the house with such items. I got to liking unsweetened tea ...


4

This is normal that she drinks less water in winter time. Is it not the same for you? But about your problem - try using some children water bottles (with her favorite character) and leave it so she can easily access it. add some frozen berries or slice of lemon or orange to glass of water use a straw My 2 year old likes to drink a lot if she can drink it ...


4

Maybe they are frustrated at how little liquid they get on the spoon. In my experience, children usually go from the bottle to a cup with a sip lid, or to a straw. In both cases you get liquid far quicker than a spoon would be.


3

US Department of Health and Safety has some information: http://www.hhs.gov/safety/bpa/ To reduce the potential transfer of BPA to the foodstuffs: avoid containers not labeled 'bpa-free' (ideal) Of if you don't know: avoid hot foods/liquids in containers avoid scratched containers In general, if safety is a concern, I'd let federal agency/mandatory ...


3

We discovered that in spite of a sore throat, our infant enjoys eating ice cubes. We thus freeze milk or water into thin ice cubes using an ice cube tray or a small cup, and break it into small pieces to feed the infant. Here is a quote from an adult who tried this method (see link) to treat his own sore throat: For day-time relief, ice-cubes have been a ...


3

He’s not been needing a pacifier for 3 months now It turned out, this was the solution to, although not necessarily the cause of the problem. After we had given him back a pacifier when in bed, his nightly drinking needs were greatly reduced. It simply may have been the desire for suckling that was satisfied by drinking from a bottle. He is 3 now and does ...


3

I hope someone can give you a better answer than mine. I assume you've tried the usual: tempting him with his favorite foods/drinks? The fact that he's deaf and blind without other neurological conditions means he probably can't override his body's regulatory mechanisms of drinking when thirsty. It takes an incredible will to go on a hunger strike (and yes,...


3

If you're in a western-ish country (US, Canada, UK, etc), chai tea is actually just spiced tea. So, if you were making your own, you could very well just skip the tea leaves and use warm milk with the Masala Chai spices added for the little one. I am a huge fan of chai tea lattes in the wintertime, and would have no qualms about doing this for my 2.5 yr old ...


2

Here are some ideas. They might not all be appropriate for your situation, and you don't have to use all of them! Sometimes it helps to give information to a child about her health situation. One resource you could use for this might be https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/constipation.html. This is a website aimed at children. If your child doesn't read ...


2

I think you should try to avoid sugar eating habits in her life. Young children are drawn to fats and sugars. Instead of giving candies or juices our family tries to find tasty fruits and vegetables. The main reason is to teach good habits. At previous birthdayparty at our house none of the dozen kids wanted soft drinks. They asked for home made juice. ...


1

I want to suggest a doidy cup, but although they’re fairly inexpensive here in the UK, they might be quite pricey in other countries. They have a different shape of lip (rim?) to make the transition from bottle/breast/sippy cup to grown up cup slightly easier. You might find wider cups help in a similar way. (Disclaimer: I’m not employed by doidy cup, but I’...


1

I also have a child who needs to drink a lot for health reasons, including a tendency towards constipation. What helped for her was gamifying her water intake. We'd send her to school with a large water bottle and challenge her to have finished it by the time we picked her up. We would always ask about it when picking her up from school, and if it wasn't ...


1

Our 3 year old doesn't drink a lot either, also not in summer time. This has worried us in the past. My advice: do not worry too much. The most important thing is to look for signs of dehydration like others say here and to always provide access to water. We always provide access to water by putting a water bottle on the coffee table and make sure we have ...


1

It's slow, but works. Suggested by our daycare provider (home-based) and later suggested by a pediatrician: spoon-feed the infant.


1

It is important to remember that BPA has been used in everyday plastics, including baby bottles, for decades and absolutely no ill effects in humans have been linked to everyday BPA exposure. The concern with BPA is purely hypothetical, so BPA is avoided in food packaging today out of an overabundance of caution. There are more important things to worry ...


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