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Tell her she has to watch out for him. That she is bigger and older and does know better and can teach him things (SAFE things, probably not swimming or parachuting) and read to him. Let her win at being the leader and having attention and being praised for being a good kid. Tell him to listen to her. Let the kids work it out together.


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Like Meg, I also don't have a teenager, so this answer isn't from personal experience either, but it sounds to me like you're in a power struggle. If "the only punishment she cares about", as you put it, results in more of the undesired behavior, this tells me your child is not very responsive to punishment, and you should try a different approach (which, in ...


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I don't have a teenager, so I can't give you anything that I have tried with success on my own child, but I do remember being a teen. I think the first step should probably be therapy. What is going on with her that this morning struggle routine is more desirable than just going to class? What makes her so unconcerned about the negative impact on her ...


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The fact that you say he does it for fun makes me think he's not doing it to hurt you, or maybe even for attention. It sounds to me like he might be in the trajectory schema. A schema is a phase young children go through where they really focus on one thing to help them understand the world. You'll probably recognize many of them, even if your child hasn't ...


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You are introverted Honestly this sounds more like you are an introvert than an issue with your child. I am introverted as well and I can tell you from experience that having children makes finding a balance an incredibly difficult struggle, but not impossible. Without "me" time, quiet time, and time to yourself to recharge your social meter you will ...


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