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1

The way I see it, there are two ways you can go with this: either adapt the rewards to something more inherently personal, or work on their (and possibly your) view of what ownership within the family looks like. To the former end, there are conceivable rewards that are naturally personal, such as parent-child one on one time for some fun activity (this ...


3

Two things here that we do that might translate well here. First: allowing a child to pick out an item is in and of itself a benefit to them. If we're at the store buying a tub of ice cream, and just one tub, if my oldest gets to decide what flavor we buy, he's happy - even though his younger sibling gets to eat some too. A more concrete example: We ...


5

Disclaimer: I don't believe in the use of any form of punishment in parenting, and I further believe that if a consequence is being arbitrarily decided by a parent, then that's just a punishment with the added insult that the parent won't even own up to the fact that it is, so I'll have none of those either. You've already identified that you have two, ...


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