Hot answers tagged

10

Children accept or reject foods based on different reasons than adults do. Often the exact same food (to you) will be accepted if you change some trivial aspect of it. Some tips: texture really matters. Many kids reject meat for texture reasons. There's a reason why burgers are such a popular kid food. Burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, sausages, any time the ...


9

Some nutritionists advise against a strict vegan diet, particularly for very young children, as it can be difficult to meet their nutritional requirements. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/apr/20/veganism-safe-children https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/vegetarian-diets-and-children As a parent your primary responsibility ...


9

No, their diet is not reasonable. They are building bodies so need a significant amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins (that's before you even look at trace minerals, omega group of fatty oils and such). Even though our children eat almost everything (and lots of it), a blood test showed our son was short on iron and vitamin D. It is critical for ...


6

A diverse diet is important to adequate nutrition, beyond just making sure they have enough fruits/veggies. We need a small amount of a lot of vitamins and minerals, and a diverse diet helps make sure we get enough of the less common ones periodically. Unless you're a trained nutritionist it can be very difficult to ensure everything is provided for in a ...


5

Definitely not. Dave covered that well. How do you deal with it? Well, for one, stop giving them fruit for dessert. They're both old enough to understand hunger. If they don't eat their dinner, no additional food is available; dinner is in the fridge and can be brought out an hour later. Otherwise, sorry. Going to bed hungry one or two nights won't ...


5

Give them a nudge If your child is a picky eater, it's your job as a parent to give them a little bit of a nudge. They will be less healthy and it won't serve them in later life. My middle child who is a picky eater has noticeably less stamina than the other two. Find out what motivates them You need to find out what motivates your child. You can use this ...


5

If she’s genuinely hungry, she’ll eat vegetables or fruit. The typical strategy we use is to let the kids have as much healthy snacks as they want (so long as it’s not just before mealtime) but limit the unhealthy snacks. They end up eating vegetables or fruit when they’re actually hungry, and a reasonable amount of other things. Any change like this will ...


5

Why would you expect your toddler to be bothered? Babies tastes develop over time - at first the are focused on sweet flavours. What commonly happens is that the child starts to be less interested in their food, so you add in new flavours and textures over time. Doing this helps build their acceptance of tastes. But for now, as long as your baby is ...


4

Talking with the other parents would be the fastest short-term solution. Really, it's quite helpful for them to know in advance what their guest can (or will) eat. In the case of a food allergy, it's obviously vitally important, but even knowing food preferences is enormously helpful. I don't recommend talking directly to her friends. If it is not a topic ...


4

I am not a doctor, and this forum is not a substitute for getting medical advice. If you think your daughter has a medical problem, you should seek care from a competent medical provider. That said, has anybody mentioned Prader-Willi syndrome to you? It is a genetic disorder that results in a person always being hungry. Characteristic of PWS is "low muscle ...


4

Just my personal opinion, but: I think this is a choice you should leave up to your children. Whether or not a vegetarian or vegan diet is good, advisable or even ethically required is very much in debate, with good arguments for both sides. From a medical point of view, I think the general consensus is that vegetarian is ok for children, if it is ...


3

Meat, in and of itself, isn't something that you must eat any particular amount of. Many people are quite successful vegetarians and vegans, even as children, and on the other side of things, well, many children have meat-centric meals at least as much as you describe with no ill effects. The important consideration is the diet as a whole, and what effect ...


3

The recommendations on how much of a particular food group should be included in a healthy diet give amounts per day, and aren't so concerned about which meals each item is included in. Depending on which set of guidelines you look at, a seven year old girl should be getting 3-5 ounces of lean proteins a day. Here are a couple of links to charts that break ...


3

Eating onions as well as garlic will affect the taste of your breast milk. I was having an issue with my baby spitting up after eating while my mother was visiting a couple of weeks after I gave birth. After she left the baby stopped spitting up. It wasn't until 2 month later my husband and I figured it out... when we tried to bottle feed the baby with (...


2

I can't improve on Dave's answer but I can add some advice about picky eaters. Our 5-yr-old is so picky she was bordering on malnutrition. After a visit to the doc to get her checked, he recommended protein and nutritional drinks to supplement her diet. (We use a protein powder that's essentially a meal replacement; took trying a LOT of different ones to ...


2

I don't know about the flavor, but I do know that a number of foods go into the breastmilk and some are very hard for babies to digest. It gives them stomach cramps. Onions is one of them, as is cabbage. However, this varies from baby to baby and they can get these problems with just about any food. The best thing to do is to keep track of your own diet and ...


2

I'd argue it's never the case that no should always mean no. No should mean no only for as long as that's your honest opinion. There's a popular idea that once you've said no you'll have to stick to that, lest the kids learn that they can have their way by screaming. I find the opposite to be true: kids who have learned that you are flexible and will stand ...


2

Ten years old is old enough to learn how to cook, and as such I'd suggest that as the starting point for your approach to this. I'm not talking 'tuna surprise and PB&J', but help her learn the fundamentals of cooking, perhaps from a cooking school if you two don't have enough of a background to teach that. Learn the fundamentals of preparation, how ...


2

I take the view that if she wants to reap the benefits of picky eating, she's old enough to also start bearing the costs. That means she should be the one to inform her friends' parents about what she isn't willing to eat, and weigh that discomfort against the discomfort of eating something she doesn't like, broadening her pallette, going hungry, or turning ...


2

As long as she gets a health variety, the flavors don't matter. It's better to feed her with a spoon or cup than with a bottle so that she can get used to using the front part of her mouth to handle pureed food and liquids. If she always gets a bottle, she'll miss out on the experience of eating. The food goes right past her tongue into the back of her mouth....


2

I can totally understand refusing to give her more treats, even if it takes half an hour of crying, but there was no reason for you to deny her food entirely. You should have offered her something healthier, like carrots or cheese or yogurt. If she refuses a couple of good healthy options, then you can say "Your options are what I offered, or waiting until ...


1

My daughters had a friend who called herself a "flexitarian". Basically she was just a picky eater but had concocted a whole backstory behind her dietary choices. It was really quite entertaining actually. Your child shouldn't be ashamed. Let her have fun with it. Kid's tastes evolve as they grow, so keep introducing new things. Part of the picky eating of ...


1

I guess it depends on what you mean by varied. My boys can have quite a short menu of foods that they will eat, but they do encompass Hot Dogs, Pizza, as well as Sushi, Pasta, and Chinese Dumplings. Overall it's more important you get nutrition, your Pediatrician should be able to guide you on what the needs are as they change over time. If you feel like ...


1

I tend to use Trello to track all kinds of things. It's essentially a series of lists grouped into a board. The app (android) is great, as is the website and will allow for multiple users (Parents, grandparents, caregivers) to log in and make changes/add new entries. As an example you could create lists for foods eaten, and if there is a reaction to that ...


1

I'm using Feed Baby (Pro) to track feeding, sleeping, diapers and so on. I find it very user-friendly, for example you tap to log what is going on now, and you hold to log an event that happend in the past. You can just select and tap to add an event without details or add a short note. It has cloud backup, and you can synchronize accross devices. The ...


1

Trixie Tracker has a section for eating, as far as I can recall. You have to pay for that. It stores data online. I don't know if it will correlate data, but you can enter observations about meals. I has been 3 years since I have used it, so you may want to double check. Care Zone has tools for managing anyones health. It is mostly about medications and ...


1

There are a few possible motivations for starting a diet. Actually being overweight. While this may seem a good reason for a child to be on a diet, it's actually still not highly advisable. Restricting calorie intake and snacks can lead to an unhealthy relationship with food and poor self-image in the long term, and raise the risk of eating disorders. It's ...


1

Yes, you should be bothered by enforced blandness as well as the fact that your child treats bland food as a preference. From personal experience - our older kid was raised as a baby/toddler on VERY bland food (both due to our inexperience, family influence and allergy issues) while our younger one was not. As a result, the older one (now in early school ...


1

I personnally think you don't have to vary meals a lot. If the meal is balanced and give him everything he needs, then he can have it forever. It's like the "5 vegetables / 2 fruits a day" rule. My! If you buy only what's available in season and of good quality, you can't always find 5 different vegetables a day. And how would you cook them together. 4 ...


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