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41

The most common problem with baby boys “leaking” is based on male anatomy. During a diaper change, you’ll typically have the baby on his back. The baby’s little penis may flop every random direction. If it’s pointing upwards when you put the diaper on, there’s a good chance that you get some spillage at the top and a mostly dry diaper, especially if a little ...


30

You are dealing with two issues here: stool toileting refusal and the associated constipation. Constipation: Your doctor is probably recommending an enema because an impaction is preventing defecation at this point. I have an acquaintance who has had success in this same situation using a commercial suppository that is administered by eyedropper – you ...


26

In short, you have to be a ninja. Boys are much better at getting money shots than girls (my nephew got me in the ear as I turned my head to shield my eyes). What you have to do is have a towel in one hand, as you take the diaper off with the other. Place the towel (can also just be the new diaper, but you'll usually end up changing twice) over the ...


26

Yes you can wait. Unless you can't be interrupted (like when you're driving), you should change the diaper "reasonably fast," meaning within ten minutes or so during the daytime. That's a very rough guideline though. Here are some considerations: It varies how well children handle nighttime diaper changes. If you can change during the night, do it. That ...


19

One of the main reasons a newborn (particularly such a new newborn!) dislikes diaper changes is the fact that they're cold. Really cold. Normally they have this nice warm layer on them that keeps them warm and cozy, and you're ripping that off of them with nary a care for their ... well, I'm sure that's what the newborn thinks, anyway. To avoid this, you ...


15

I hate to say this (and I SWEAR it's not a pun) but it depends. For our daughter, pull-ups were more of a hassle than they were worth. She treated them like a diaper and was not interested in going into big-kid undies until we took them away and replaced them with training panties (the thick kind that can be soiled without causing a level 4 hazmat incident)...


15

My experience with my son was this: every time he was experiencing a noticeable number of leaks, we went up a size and it addressed the issue. It's true that, on a couple of occasions, his penis was pointing upward when the diaper was put on and that contributed to some over the waistband escapes, but this also correlated with the diaper being too small.


14

With a newborn, you can certainly wait. Ten minutes, as Torben sais, is a good measure. Note that this doesn't mean you should always wait that long. From my own experience, this changes once you start introducing solid foods, which is usually around six months of age. Solid faeces are much more prone to irritate the skin, so changing the diaper quickly ...


14

Potty training is so fun with kids. It's one step forward, two steps back, three steps forward, a shuffle to the side... In short, this sounds like one of the usual stops along the route towards full potty training. I don't see that you're doing anything wrong. Have you tried to talk with her about it? I don't know how verbal she is; my daughter was VERY ...


14

No. As Peter commented, diapers/nappies have been used for hundreds of years and especially kept on at night to avoid nocturnal accidents. The common problem with them is nappy rash, and you are already well aware of that. Aside from that, they have had no effect on the healthy growth of legs. Nappies, especially modern ones, do not hold the legs apart. ...


13

Three ideas (one you might not like, but if it works...): Make sure he goes to the bathroom just before bed. Did wonders for our daughter. Try some higher-absorbency pullups. Since he's almost 6, maybe move to GoodNights or something similar for older kids with bladder control issues. You might just be overloading the capacity of the diaper. If you can ...


12

As Valkyrie said, no child goes to college in diapers. Don't put too much pressure on yourself or her as that tends to make things worse. If she has an accident, just gently remind her that pee pee and poop go in the potty--which she knows all ready, but you know how often you have to remind kids about stuff! Then find a way that she can help you clean up ...


12

I'm at total loss of what to do, how to punish her, and what to believe. I'm desperate to find answers. If I were in your situation, I would be dumbfounded as to how my daughter managed to handle that condition/practice for so long, I really would. And I would be worried for her. But you've known about it for years. Why suddenly panic? But manage it she ...


11

Urine smell comes from urea that is converted to ammonia by bacteria. Ammonia is a gas that can easily permeate through many textiles, and some plastics, too. So the smell being noticeable from the outside is not necessarily a sign of actual (liquid) leakage. Ammonia can attach itself to all sorts of surfaces by a process called adsorption, which explains ...


11

I do a body block by leaning across the baby's belly (without any weight being put on the baby) until I've got things cleaned up, up front. It also prevents the child rolling over and escaping the area where I am doing the changing. I can then move to a better angle for being certain I've got the back end fully cleaned up while knowing that at least the ...


10

He is taking the diaper off because he is uncomfortable. BIG SIGNAL that is time to potty train and a really good reason not to force him to stay in it. How well do you sleep if you are uncomfortable anyway? Ask him to sit on the potty about 15 minutes before naptime. While he sits, read stories, play clapping games, sing songs etc so that it is fun to be ...


10

There exists a UK study dating from 2005, which was updated in 2008. A good summary can be found at the Kimberly-Clark Australia and New Zealand homepage. To summarise the summary: It depends... If you are always washing the fabric diapers at 95 °C and put them in the dryer, the overall energy use will be higher than if you use disposable diapers. If you ...


10

I was intrigued by your question. I wondered how much diaper changing had changed since I practiced Pediatrics (as an FP). I googled as well. I can't find a source that remotely suggested the practice, so I will say that it appears to be physiologically unnecessary. The American Academy of Pediatrics says nothing about that on it's baby care/diaper change ...


8

There is no brand of diaper that is safe to flush down the toilet if you have a septic You should not flush disposable diaper liners or wipes either, nor tampons, cotton swabs or cotton balls. Basically the only thing you should allow to enter a septic system is urine, feces, and toilet paper. Even food should not go into the system, which is why you won't ...


8

That sounds relatively normal. Note that a newborn has no concept of day and night yet - at least in the sense of what is a time for activity or sleeping. Even older babies that have good "sleeping habits" often get an early evening bout of activity - the time window in the evening many working dads (and moms) enjoy. Also, being put down in the bassinet ...


7

I believe the indicator simply reacts to moisture, not urine specifically. If you're prepared to sacrifice a diaper, you could simply test it with water. When my son was born, the hospital had Pampers diapers with a wetness indicator. When "off" it was invisible, and when the diaper was wet (used), a vertical blue line appeared on the outside of the diaper. ...


7

For a diaper to fit correctly, the following must be true: The back must go above the top of the "butt crack" or urine will leak out the back, because the crack breaks the seal If this isn't true, you probably need a bigger diaper so it can go higher up the back The straps must go above the hips, and be tighter than the hips or the diaper will slip ...


7

Some babies are extremely sensitive, and will cry about the slightest wetness. Some babies will have a huge soaking blowout in the middle of the night and barely make a peep. We've had both ways. If you're lucky, your baby will be somewhere in between. Newborns wake up to get fed a lot, so generally you'll be just fine if you check the diaper just before ...


7

Is he able to articulate at all why he's scared to poop? (Our daughter was afraid of what happened to the poop after it was flushed. Once she groked that she was good to go.) Finding the reason for his fear will probably go a long way towards you finding a solution for this problem. Maybe try the book It Hurts When I Poop. Did wonders for my nephew with ...


7

Make sure the changing area is safe. Floor is best. Make lying down part of a game. Introduce "hide and seek" games - throw thin gauzy material over the face and gently pull it off, sayig "peek a boo!" Try introducing music. Try seperating the proces out into several distinct steps to reduce discomfort and risk. Thus, strip clothes then have a break. ...


7

As a first step, don't water down his milk at bed time. That's just giving him extra fluids without nutritional value that won't do much to make him feel full. With straight milk, he will probably consume a bit more calories, but not so much fluid, giving him less need to pee. It may also be a good idea to set a fixed amount you feed him every night. No ...


7

My suspicion is that it is not linked to health, but instead linked to ensuring you check the child's diapers on a regular basis, and proving to the parents that you are. Your kindergarten/daycare may operate differently from mine, but the daycare we used for the first few years (which was a large center) did something similar; diapers were changed every 2 ...


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