35

Speaking from experience1, your child is advanced, very likely gifted - but it happens. Remember that “normal” is just a statistical distribution and doesn’t imply any value or sense of wrong or right. (You may need that image in a few years down the road when your child wonders why he’s “not normal”.) I am very sure that while your support and encouragement ...


9

He’s five, so his TV (and iPad and game console and...) time should be minimal and you still have the authority to simply cut it. Of course, there’s school work and remote lessons, but I see no reason why he should have unlimited access. The next step for me would be to make sure that there’s a good selection of “material” available, ranging from his usual ...


8

Can every three year old? Probably not. But yes, it's not outside the realm of possibility. What you'll find is that oftentimes kids who are particularly exposed to one thing will end up learning far more about that thing - think Mozart, for example; while he was undisputedly a genius regardless of his experience, there's no question that his ability was ...


8

You child is probably gifted, but you need a specialized test to tell that (impossible to assess over the internet by strangers). It seems like he is hitting developmental milestones a few years ahead of the average for his age (see CDC's developmental milestones). There are several tests available for testing gifted children starting from as early as 2 ...


6

This is super common. It’s actually easier to go backwards than forwards for some kids, if they're using their arms primarily instead of their legs - pushing is easier than pulling, right? It’s very common for kids to go through a phase of crawling where they go backwards. One of my kids did, one didn’t - that one didn’t really crawl at all though. For ...


4

This is coming from someone who’s parent has quite a severe case of misophonia. They have a sensitivity to sounds of eating, coughing, clicking, sniffing, tapping, cutlery on plates, doors being shut loudly and also reactions to being suddenly touched. Growing up my parent would react angrily to these sounds and thus both me and my siblings have to come to ...


3

In the links provided, and links from those pages, I could not quickly find any peer-reviewed research articles that show any benefit whatsoever of the "baby sensory videos". Without such evidence, the videos appear to be not beneficial for any age. I recommend not following recommendations of questionable sources, especially when they appear to ...


3

Talk to your child's doctor. If there's something concerning you about your child's development, I would recommend talking to your child's doctor. Random internet strangers can't diagnose any conditions your child may or may not have. It's possible that your child is perfectly normal; it's possible that they might have some kind of learning disorder; it's ...


3

I would try to get him interested in activities that improve his core muscles. Swimming would be my first approach. That way you can help him to fix his posture indirectly.


3

This depends on too many details to have a direct Yes or No answer. Can a nine year old have some responsibilities for the household, and be held accountable for those responsibilities? Absolutely. My nine year old does the laundry for the family and unloads dishes. My seven year old does our recycling and feeds the cat. Is bathing a younger sibling an ...


2

I have a child with some mild executive function disorders, their impulse control falters under certain conditions. We spent about a year thinking it was deliberate, obstinate, and/or intentionally defiant behavior. Once they went thru a neuropsych evaluation and we got to working with a pediatric psychologist, it was a huge eye opener. Understanding it not “...


2

I recommend the book Nurture Shock. It has some very interesting things in it about child development that would seem to be of interest to you. About whether what your child can do is normal, my answer is that it doesn't matter. The focus should be on developing your child in all areas at whatever skill level he exhibits, regardless of whether any of that is ...


2

I'm not a child psychologist, but I have 9 children. Every one of them is as different from the rest as you can imagine. One of them learned to read by 3. Another didn't start reading until 8. The rest were in between. The one that learned to read by 3 progressed very slowly. The one that didn't start reading until 8 was reading JRR Tolkien within a year. ...


2

encouraging it through indirect interest such as yoga and ballet is a good start, but like everything you have to also show the example.


2

Yes! Having a vacation was really good for you all. Trips with a baby are not easy, and probably not as relaxing as vacations without children, but they are worth it. I'm sure you know the difference between 'parent-led' and 'baby-led' parenting. The general consensus among parent-led advocates is that children thrive in a routine, which I personally agree ...


2

First of all, you should not let your baby sleep for extended periods of time in a car seat or carrier. The danger comes from letting your baby sleep seated upright or on an incline. “When your baby is seated, her heavy head can fall forward causing difficulty breathing…and even suffocation,” explains Dr. Harvey Karp. “That’s why car seats—outside of moving ...


2

There exist plenty of songs for children, starting with very simple ones, that a toddler may actually learn to sing - it is a very useful activity for speech development. If you cannot remember any such songs from your childhood, you can find playlists for children in podcasts or youtube or by simply using Disney cartoons (provided that the child does not ...


2

Teach the child what it means when the job is, say, 10%, 50%, 80% or almost 100% done. And then teach the child where, when, how and to which percent completion to do various tasks. Regarding this: "I wouldn't be wanting everything to be done as well as it can possibly be, but for everything to be fully completed": Do not teach the child to do all ...


2

Having a non-traditional sexual orientation is a perfectly normal part of life as is being "non-white" or "non-Christian", etc. As such the media just reflects reality. Good numbers are hard to come by but maybe 5% or so of the population is "non-straight". The current scientific consensus is that this is mostly "hardwired&...


2

It sounds like you're well prepared to protect your child from exposure to particulate matter. So congrats on your good planning! My major concern with renovating during the colder months would be exposure to VOCs (volatile organic compounds). I can't cite definitive literature for problems with children, because it's a relatively new concern except for ...


1

Car seat and traveling habits Traveling long distances with a baby is not a problem, provided that you have a properly adapted car seat (which however requires appropriate investements). Portable carriers are designed not for keeping a baby inside for more than an hour, but rather for being able to move her easily, e.g., when deposing her in nursery or ...


1

Every child is different, and some parents consider their children "more ready" than others to start school. I'm in the UK, where most children begin school the September after their 4th birthday. This means that some children in the same class are just 4, whereas some will be nearly 5, so classrooms contain an age range that spans a whole 12 ...


1

I let my niece make some levels on my account when she was four, and I'd say they're on a par with James' daughters levels, or thereabouts! Like his daughter, her chief goal was adding a lot of enemies to make the level hard to beat. Note that since they are both playing the levels on the same console there is no requirement for her to beat her own levels, ...


1

On top of the Yoga and Ballet idea from @JOduMonT getting your son to play as though he is a soldier and doing parade drills could help. Marching around with him, with shoulders back and chest out, pointing out that soldiers always stand straight will encourage him to mimic that. The more he practices standing straight, the muscles in the back and shoulders ...


1

I could not locate any thorough research that indicated whether a podcast or music would be more beneficial for a toddler to listen to for development purposes—only a cursory article covering the matter. Though one quote seems to be in line that podcasts probably don't have much of a benefit, if any, to toddlers. Research indicates that recorded voices don'...


1

My suggestion may not be the popular route, but it is what I did back in the non-apocalyptic days. First, the screen is evil. But not in a modern parenting circadian rhythm or healthy development way, but more in the fact that its abundant uselessness in the form of youtube banalities is definitely guiding your kid down a certain route none of us know the ...


1

Stephie hit it spot on. At 5, his world is entirely created by your choices. Screens and the media on them triggers strong hormone responses in humans, specially young ones, they are carefully crafted to. Creativity, problem solving and internal motivation grow from necessity, and boredom is a fantastic and safe motivator. Choose some small weekend time for ...


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