19

when I was driving and he used bad words to me and punched to my head many time, I wanted to call 911 , but he said I will kill you later if you do it. We asked police before , but they said we can help you if something happened !! You were assaulted. Call them. The fact that he is your son only matters as far as you are responsible for him. If he will hit ...


15

Should I push my parents to divorce? To make it plain: No. The answer is "no" for at least two reasons: The decision whether or not to divorce is quite complex, with multiple consequences either way. This is a decision only your parents can make, and it is unlikely that you can judge better than them what will most benefit them in the long run (though you ...


11

I don't think this is a problem. Source: I went through something similar, as did several of my friends. This is normal. This is not unusual. Also, it is quite possible that his claims are correct. For example, where I live, there is a mandatory test, written at a 7th grade level, that is given to 10th, 11th, and 12th graders, and has a 50% pass rate. To me,...


10

Your question doesn't really touch it, but the title does, so I'll first point out I'm not qualified to give advice on suicide prevention. I would also call that off topic for this site. I will try to focus on the parenting angle of how to parent him in this crisis, as opposed to how to be his psychologist. On that note, your already doing something right ...


8

but I want to raise him myself once I'm able to get rid of my postpartum symptoms and once I'm stronger as a single parent I understand that you want to raise your son. I think you should explain this to your in-laws as soon as possible, so that there are no misunderstandings about your intentions (and depending on how your marriage and your relationship ...


7

As someone who suffers from depression and anxiety and was finally diagnosed with ADHD in their 30's, I feel your pain on this one. What can you do to convince your mother you have them? Unfortunately, it sounds like nothing. You've tried that and she doesn't believe you. Whether it's because she doesn't believe that these things exist at all or just ...


6

Although it's not clear exactly what you're asking, I can sense your frustration and it sounds like you are fresh out of ideas. So I am assuming you're looking for new ideas, and with that said: When he is in a good mood, sit down with him and ask him what he wants. As in, what he wants out of life in general. What kind of career, family or experiences ...


6

Unless your brother is hostile, or sullen, or otherwise behaves inappropriately around your children, I don't think you need to keep him away from them. I think it's healthy for your children to learn how to be around people with all sorts of varying personality types. Not everyone is bright and cheerful, and that's ok. It is very difficult dealing with ...


6

I'm sorry for what your family is going through. It must be very frightening for all involved, and really does require the help of a professional or two (or three.) You might benefit from individual counseling at this time as well to help you to handle this. You can't force your child to have a different opinion of life. He isn't wrong to hold that opinion; ...


5

Put simply, no, I don't think you should push your parents for divorce. In addition to the answer that sleske gave, I'd give you these points to consider: Depression is a horrible mental illness that can last a very, very long time. The medications tend to suck, take a long time to kick in, and make things worse for the patient for the first few weeks. The ...


5

Your situation is indeed very sad. You have tried to do everything right by your son, unfortunately he has made very poor choices, which have negatively impacted everyone. I think all you can really do is try to keep yourselves safe, and never be in a situation where either of you is alone with him. Unfortunately a drug users word cannot be trusted. He may ...


5

I am seriously not qualified to say anything specific, but depression might not be what you think it is. Please, go with your daughter to the doctor. Talk to the doctor first in private. I think when a child, any child, threatens suicide in any way other than a one-off obvious joke, a parent should take it seriously. Very seriously. The worse mistake you ...


5

It's a good first step that you asked for help. But your problem can't be solved by random people on the internet and therefore isn't a good fit for this web site. But there are people who can help you to be resilient, to change the situation at home or to get you out of this situation, whatever might in the end be the best. Is there some relative that you ...


4

Well, first I'd suggest you give counseling a chance. There are lots of ways this can be arranged, including working with someone at school, such as a social worker. It helped me not take things so personally. Talking regularly with a counselor can also be helpful for a person's self-esteem. Second, model the behavior you'd like to receive. Compliment ...


4

Anxiety and depression are pretty common when you don't get along with your parents and they're abusive. So that's not really a huge surprise. 'Laziness' or a lack of motivation and energy is common among depression sufferers - even dealing with normal situations can be hugely taxing and frequently the issue is with motivation as you're finding with the ...


4

The most important thing is to be aware of the signs of depression in general, and to seek professional help even for apparently minor issues. You've already got that covered because of the preexisting condition, which is good -- keep it up. Post-partum depression is often not just due to hormones, but also the stress and sleeplessness of being a new parent....


4

Talking to an expert can only help. He has to learn that our expectations are rarely fulfilled, and that we have to learn to live with life when it doesn't go as planned. With more experience, he will discover this for himself. Depression is a huge problem amongst young people and won't be fixed overnight. If he sits around feeling sorry for himself, then it ...


4

I see no evidence that anyone has done anything wrong that needs fixing yet. Going on the internet is not something that requires "cleaning up". Maybe his family should work harder to make sure that their child gets sufficient face-to face socialization with his peers. But really, he's reading things on the internet. This is not in an of itself a problem....


4

Some thoughts, unordered: Research (see below) seems to indicate that children of divorced parents are no more unhappy than children of parents still living together, if the divorced parents cooperate in their care for their child and don't fight. So if something is amiss with your child, see if there is something amiss with your relationship with his ...


4

It sounds like when he is at home, he cannot help responding (and thinking) like the child he used to be. This is not uncommon. I think we can all relate at some level, when we are outside the home we grew up in, we behave in one way, but find ourselves falling back into the psychological patterns of childhood when we go "home" to visit. Sometimes we don'...


4

It sounds to me like you are doing your best to help your brother. Kudos to you for the therapy, for both of you. And for trying to help bear the burden of the crushing depression that you both must be feeling right now. My heart really goes out to both of you. I know first-hand what that kind of depression feels like. When I was in college I suffered ...


4

tl;dr: If you try to 'explain' life has a meaning, your son might stop listening to you. Life might be meaningless, but it can be pretty interesting. === What you wrote resonates with me. My feelings/thoughs were similar to those of your son. The existing answers bring up valid points (and one or two I am horrified by). But I think there is something ...


4

I have a similar situation with my 19-year old son right now. In addition to leading him to professional councelling, which you have already done, I try not to project my own fear and deep concern on my son. That is more than challenging for you as a parent than most of the challenges you have probably ever been confronted with, I imaging. But (and this has ...


4

You need to develop a support system First of all, I want to start off with the standard stuff about the perils of suicidal ideation and to encourage you to seek out help, even if that help is calling 911 if you think you're going to willingly hurt yourself. I won't promise that doing this is going to result in something that's not a massive mess, but I will ...


3

The first time my son declared "I hate you!", I told him, "I know, I love you too." He never said it agein. Insulting you and your wife is one thing. You are both adults and know he doesn't really mean it. Insulting his little sister isn't healthy for her. Sudden behavior changes in a young child could indicate something has happened that he does not know ...


3

Don't focus on the Internet thing - if take action to reduce your brothers involvement with the Internet, that will just create resentment, and make him even more isolated. Instead, focus on the loneliness. As far as you can, be a friend to your brother. Introduce him to your friends, create opportunities for him to socialise, encourage others to do the ...


3

my ex father in law took him to the Dr today and they wont help my son , thats nearly impossible a psychiatrist doesn't help someone especially if he has depression symptoms. Maybe the doctor is not a psychiatrist or the father is lying. However if you cannot send him to a doctor , try to talk to the father and understand who the doctor and why he didn't ...


3

Unfortunately all you can do now is demonstrate "tough love" and cut him out of your lives, until such time as he shows that he has made concrete changes to improve. There are two things that make this true: 1) If you were able to help him, you would already have done it. 2) It won't help his life at all if he harms you, and when you are around him, that ...


3

This is from my personal experience: To improve your situation at home you can start to be nice with your parents. Help them whenever you can and always wear a smile to them. Whenever they criticize you, instead of being upset, ask them advise to get better. Also you can try to improve your relationship with your sister in this way, resolving the problem ...


3

Sleep deprivation really feeds into PPD. So the simplest thing you could do for her is to help her to have the opportunity to sleep as much as possible. You giving the baby a bottle once in a while so she can sleep uninterrupted for a few hours could be really helpful.


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