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6

Unexplained/seemingly random toddler phobias are extremely common, and particularly with children that are more anxious or sensitive in general. I know of one small child who would cry hysterically when hearing anyone sing the Happy Birthday song, while my own son at a similar age was incredibly averse to anything with a motor noise like the vacuum, ...


5

This is pretty common in this age, and we've definitely had similar issues with both of ours. Part of it is that they can't see the long term very well - right now is the only time to them, and so it's hard to understand putting off what they want now because they don't feel like they'll ever get it. That makes compromise hard, and also makes it seem like ...


4

I will second what A.bakker already said, the only way to get her to stop being scared is to get her to play with him. Word's don't work with kids that young, they have to see for themselves that he isn't scary. That being said the hard part is getting her to play with him that first time so she can see he is okay. I've had allot of experience getting kids ...


4

Telling a kid something rarely works, because let's face it kids aren't able to fully comprehend such things. Best is to show it... 2 years ago I met my my 4 cousins (1,3,3,5) all of them shy and scared of strangers like me... i got the oldest to trust me by just sitting on the floor where she was drawing and started to draw... she first went away and hid ...


3

Your son's needs/wants likely changed to something not available at daycare Without a lot of additional information, it'll be difficult to state definitively what the problem is. But I'm guessing you're super tired, so I'm going to advise on where to direct your limited mental energy. As you're probably aware at this point, once you start figuring out your ...


2

Both of my children had night terrors beginning around 14-18 months old. There can be environmental triggers to them and they are also tied to the sleep cycle. So if your daughter is having them every hour for a few hours, that sounds consistent with a trigger. Check the temperature of her room, if it's warm, try cooling it down. If it's cold, try warming ...


2

As someone who has lost a child, you can never hug or carry them too much. That being said, from a psychological standpoint, holding, carrying, and attending to their needs when they are distressed is not spoiling. A child can not be spoiled by giving them attention at his age. young children are not neurological mature, leaving them to ‘deal’ with their ...


1

A quick google on "long term impacts of child abuse" returns a very large amount of information which makes for heartbreaking reading. An excert from one particular link I found ... https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/effects-child-abuse-and-neglect-adult-survivors Other factors that may affect the consequences of child abuse and neglect on ...


1

My daughter who is now almost 3 used to cry every time we blew into a toy flute that we had when she was really small. She would blow into it all the time without an issue, but as soon as someone else did it would trigger something to instantly make her cry. As time went on, she forgot about the flute and found it again about a year later. She now loves it ...


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