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20

The AAP says never use crib bumpers: Crib bumpers (or bumper pads) may seem as though they can help protect babies from drafts and bumps, but they should not be used in cribs. There is no evidence that bumper pads can prevent serious injuries, and they pose a risk of suffocation, strangulation, or entrapment. In addition, older babies can use them for ...


14

I personally think 21 months is time for a bed he can get in and out of himself - my parenting style leans towards independent kids. That doesn't help with the tantrums though. I have 2 suggestions you can consider: Ask him to go sit somewhere specific, where you can sit next to him. We used a stair, and if he didn't stay put we would go sit with him. ...


7

You might have to abandon the crib/Pack&Play as a time-out spot for now, and pick a corner of the house or a room with, perhaps, a few cushions or other soft things he can sit on/amongst. There he can have his meltdown safely until he cools off. Of course the downside of this is that someone needs to stand guard over him and make sure he doesn't leave ...


6

According to the CPSC, you should not resell it and should disassemble it prior to discarding it. Is it okay for me as a consumer to resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards? A consumer should not resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards, such as trying to resell ...


5

I originally didn't want to write this as a separate answer because swbarnes2's answer is perfect. However, I did want to add this extra info. Without a crib bumper the worst-case nightmare scenario, that is almost impossible is a broken arm or leg without a crib bumper (and I have never heard of that happening, it would be a freak accident). With a crib ...


5

Safety details Slats should not be more than 2 3/8 inches apart -- infants' head scan slip through smaller spaces or get stuck. Safe corner posts: no higher than 1/16 of an inch -- clothes can snag snagged on corner posts and strange the baby Make sure it's sturdy -- some cribs are poor quality. Decent wood finish (if it's wooden) Generally, you are ...


4

I don't have the links at hand right now, but my wife looked into this extensively both for cribs for our first and for painting our then-newly purchased house. Her decisions: Purchase a solid wood (not particle board or any other glued-type processed wood) crib. Varnish/paint doesn't seem to be very flexible; any crib will be finished, and the natural ...


4

A couple of things here stand out to me. First, in general, crib time outs aren't a good idea. They are convenient, but they also create negative associations with the place of sleep, which causes problems later on; around this time children often go through a phase where they don't like to go to bed (as they're starting to be aware of the ability not to!) ...


4

If you can get him to go to sleep while he's with you, and get him into his crib without his waking, more power to you. Any way you can get an infant to sleep on time is a good way.


3

I have a few tips that worked for us to get our son to go to sleep in his crib without crying, although we haven't mastered the staying there all night part quite yet. We are not keen on the leaving to cry (Weisbluth - healthy sleep habits, happy child) or controlled crying (Ferber - solve your child's sleep problems) approach so I won't cover that here ...


3

I think if your child learns to sleep in less than perfect quiet, that is a win. Life is not always white noise and perfect conditions. If you have problems down the road, then try other methods.


3

It might no be the most "accepted" thing to do, but my kids slept with the wife and me from day one. In many ways, this is equivalent to a toddler bed since as soon as they were mobile they could get out of bed. So no time is too early. Our solution to the height issue was to scrap the bed and just have a mattress. Just make sure there is nothing she can get ...


3

Assuming you mean an actual minicrib, which in the US has a size of aroiund 38 inches long by 23 inches wide (for the mattress), this will depend on your child heavily. (For comparison, a full/standard sized crib is 58 inches by 28 inches.) (Note: minicribs seem to vary some, particularly on the width. Make sure the crib you buy and the mattress you buy ...


3

Feed your baby a half an hour to an hour before they normally fall asleep. Food or cereal in their bottle helps if they are over 4months. Make it a routine. Eat, change outfit and diaper, clean mouth, relax, play some music or white noise and cuddle up. Maybe a pacifier if they are a little fussy. Then, before they fall completely asleep, put him down in the ...


3

I did 0-3 months on the top hole, 3-6 months on the next hole and so on moving every three months until I reached the bottom. I don't think I read that in a manual anywhere. It's just a timeline I thought was reasonable so I have no idea of it's the "correct" thing to do.


3

There have been studies done with healthy infants whose ankles were tied to a mobile with a ribbon (the earliest of these is cited below; it has been oft-repeated with additional variables). The reward of the mobile moving produced more leg-kicking. This confirms not only that infants watch mobiles, but also that they attempt to interact with mobiles and ...


2

I think even the most basic of cribs have adjustable mattress height now. Given the size constraints, you might check Ikea's cribs. Most of their cribs also have the advantage not having a specific back - that is a side that should go against a wall - making it easier to find a spot for it.


2

Not medical advice, but from what I've seen, there's nothing explicitly wrong with a toddler sleeping on memory foam or similar. They're past the risk of SIDS, and while some people may be better off sleeping on hard mattresses for back support, it's not true that it is strictly better - it depends on the person. The main concern I'd have with memory foam ...


2

I have an eight month old who used to do this same thing. What worked for me: Give him five minutes or so before going to him. A lot of times, my baby would be at a light point in her sleep cycle, and start stirring and crying, but would still have her eyes closed. If I would let her fuss for a few minutes, she would often move back into a deeper sleep ...


2

The process you are talking about is called "sleep training" and there are a lot of approaches to it. In general the aim is to make your child learn to fall asleep on its own. I can refer you to babycenter's sleep problems page where you can find a lot of information about the methods you can use. In general there are two groups of methods: no tears and ...


2

We switched both of ours to toddler beds between 18 and 20 months, so that's certainly not "too young" in my opinion and experience. Switching to a toddler bed in our case was driven by necessity: both of ours could climb out of the crib by that age. If your daughter can't climb out of the crib yet, you certainly don't need to, but that's not to say you ...


2

I think it is very risky to add anything to a crib. I highly recommend that you do not do it. I am an anonymous, retired special needs teacher -- and this is my opinion. I am not a doctor. Wanting your infant to exercise is exactly right. However, I don't think you need to buy anything. LINK WEBMD Model exercise -- run with your infant in a running ...


1

swbarnes2's answer is the "correct" one because the AAP has lots of data they are basing their advice on. Having said that, I used a breathable mesh bumper with most of my 5 kids because of their tendency to get an arm or leg stuck which at best woke us up at night because they were stuck and at worst led to minor bruising. When I installed my ...


1

I'll weigh in here and risk sounding like a terrible person. We had a very similar experience with our second, except maybe worse. We got some good sleep out of him for the first couple weeks of his life, but it quickly degraded into 30/45min sleep cycles all the time. For the next 3 months he never slept more than 45 minutes at a stretch, ever. I'm ...


1

It's always a risk adding anything to a crib. There are always be safety issues that people don't realize. For example, a longer string is a strangulation hazard. Too small of an object is a choking hazard. Too soft of an object is suffocation hazard. Even though you intend to take it down when the baby is not playing, other caretakers may not know to do ...


1

If your housing situation allows it, you might work around the escape problem by making it safe to escape. Our daughter sleeps in her own room. That room has her cot in it and a regular size mattress on the floor, and not much else, except some books and toys. So there's no harm in her escaping from the cot. Such a setup would also mean you don't have to ...


1

Kids are so adaptable, but one general "rule," if you want to call it that, might be consistency. If you are comfortable and confident, flexible and attuned to your child's needs, that's a great start. Kids vary. Too many prevailing opinions suggest there's a right way and a wrong way in terms of baby sleep practices from cry-it-out to co-sleeping. Not all ...


1

I have been doing some reading up on tantrums recently as my LO is a similar age and started to have them too. I found this link quite helpful - http://www.babycenter.com/0_tantrums_11569.bc as it helps you to see things from their point of view as well. Regarding timeouts it suggests to make the timeout last for about one minute per year of his ...


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