New answers tagged

1

This amount of screen time, in the context you mentioned, does not seem excessive according to my experience, and also according to the American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement. Note that the policy statement does not mention any hours per day data on specifically programming or video games. The lowest hours per day data point for watching TV after ...


2

The conflict that you've highlighted here isn't resolved by limiting screen time for your child. Since you saw benefit in your own childhood having unlimited screen time, it's obvious that you're actually more concerned with the content that your child is interacting with while using the screen than the screen itself. Resolving this (in a very naïve way; I ...


2

As others have pointed out, there's a difference between video game addictions and using computers productively. You should absolutely set limits for screen use, no matter how productive the screentime is (sitting in front of the computer all day is not healthy). Video games and social media offer two desirable things for children: socializing and an outlet ...


2

I was also a kid in the 90s, a professional programmer now. I'm trying to follow with my own kids what worked well for my mother back then. Don't focus on forbidding or limiting access to the computer --focus on insisting that your children have a well-rounded range of activities. When my mother thought I was spending too much time on the computer, she ...


2

How to properly set time limits to access to computers and phones to my kid, My way to do it is to make it a technological problem, mostly without any human intervention. That is, the technology itself gets restricted, thus avoiding constant fighting; especially so that I never have to go and turn their device off (and thus incur the wrath of a little ...


3

The benefit you got from screens was from using hackable systems; most screens I got most of the same benefit without 'net access, and with only 30 minutes access a week (later, a day), because I just had access to an old Windows 98 SE notebook (and, later, an old Windows XP laptop), a DVD full of mostly-compatible arcade games, and a folder of flash games. ...


19

The screen is not the problem. I believe we're dealing with a XY problem here. Surely screens are damaging our children irreparably. Breathe. Relax. Grab a cup of tea and consult the wikipedia list of moral panics. We've been worrying about the effects of new evil stuff on our children since forever. Listening to the devil music (Blues, Jazz, Rock and roll,...


22

In addition to all the other answers, I'd like to concentrate on the addictive behavior you described. Gaming addiction is just as real as drug addiction and very dangerous because many games, especially "harmless" free of charge mobile apps, are specifically designed to be as addictive as possible. Teenagers (which is an age your son is ...


25

My situation is very similar to what you describe: we have multiple kids — one of whom is 9, one slightly older, and one slight younger — I grew up with mostly "unlimited" computer access (though for me it was the 80s, so no interwebs — I didn't even have a modem); and I, too, struggle with the disparity between what I was allowed to do (or should ...


4

Like others in this thread I had a similar upbringing to you. When I was younger (say early primary school), I had unrestricted use on the (only) computer in the house. There was a slow and problematic internet connection, but most of my time was spent playing 'hand-me-down' games from floppy disks. The thing is, the games I played then are appallingly basic ...


12

As you say in your question, the beneficial part of your access to computers was your early exposure to programming and other productive computer skills, and the part that you are concerned about is over exposure to screens as a primary source of entertainment or distraction. I think that already contains your answer, you should allow as much access as they ...


85

My own upbringing and later career has followed much the same trajectory as you describe, so this is something I too have pondered quite a bit. But as you've already noted, we are indeed no longer in the 90's. I'd argue the technological progress in the intervening decades have rendered that frame of reference obsolete. Unlimited access to devices was by ...


9

You're saying you want to change your mind and take the computer back, but I'm assuming from your open question (and from that it in general seems like a sensible thing to do) that you'll also be open to suggestions on how to help him find a more constructive use of his computer time more in line with what you had in mind when you bought it. I find your son'...


16

What should I do? Do not engage in a power struggle with your son. It's a lose-lose situation; it will cause him to resent you if you win, and it will cause untold damage for both him and you if he wins, because it will teach him something damaging. Power struggles aren't the way successful people achieve their goals in the real world unless the issue is ...


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