83

At 15 months old, a rubik's cube would not be appropriate. First, it's kind of a complex puzzle. Most adults can't solve it. A 15 month old is going to see it as a brightly colored cube and nothing more. She will get entertainment value out of it by probably trying throw it or eat it (the stickers aren't good to eat and the individual block pieces are ...


70

At six months old, the key is to talk a lot, and to give the baby lots of opportunities to explore their environment. One approach that worked well for us was to follow the Montessori approach to organizing our house and what our children played with. One example for that approach is on this site, which gives a good overview of the concepts. Key things to ...


47

I would not recommend this as a toy, but for a different reason. As a brightly colored geometric shape a Rubik's cube would probably be appealing to small children, and at that age they will likely try to put it in their mouths. Many cubes can be dismantled into separate pieces, which could be small enough to be swallowed. Also, some cubes use colored ...


41

Turn off the TV and interact with your child If your IQs are so high, use that intelligence. You can't make a child more clever. That's built in, by nature. What you want are skills they can develop through nurture. You can help a child to build language skills by constantly interacting with them, talking to them, singing to them, reading to them. The more ...


26

There are huge soft 2x2 rubik's cubes for toddlers. Like this one: Jumbo 12157 - Rubik's Baby - My first Cube, Kleinkindspielzeug They are soft and not easily breakable. There is a youtuber called "redkb" who gave one these as a present to his nephew if I remember correctly for his 2nd birthday. So maybe that could be an alternative for you?


17

Five year old son successfully built a lego set meant for 6-12 year olds... Is this common? Yes, it's quite common. The age range on the boxed toy is not based on intelligence or aptitude. It is put there to comply with recommendations, most importantly whether the toy is safe for the child to use. In the US, the agency responsible for determining ...


15

Above all else, let her play. In my opinion there is way too much focus on academics in the early years these days, and not enough on creativity and play which are integral to how a child learns about the world around it. Let her play, be creative, use her imagination. These things will serve her phenomenally well later in life (problem solving, deductive ...


13

Your question sounds related to object permanence -- the understanding that an object should still be there even when it's out of sight. There's been research and studies into those ages in which babies start showing an understanding of object permanence. According to wikipedia, by the age of 8 to 12 months, babies will start showing the earliest ...


12

Including your children in your life and activities builds both intelligence and capacity. Especially for young children, avoid passive activities like videos, or non-human interactions such as computer games --resist the temptation to let YouTube raise them for you. Instead, have real conversations with your children. Talk to them and listen. Do creative ...


11

I think that comprehension doesn't come until reading is more effortless for the child. Early on, they're expending all their effort just reading letters and figuring out the words. As a point of reference, I noticed that my oldest daughter seemed to have very poor comprehension through Kindergarten and first grade. It seemed that in second grade the ...


11

Tips to develop intelligence in infants: Create a safe environment for the child at home, where they feel secure and loved, and have an opportunity to explore the world without excessive stress. Avoid screen time. For details, see: Should I show my six month old educational videos? Talk to the child. A lot. Use "parentese" (the exaggerated ...


10

Porn is, even to adults, the junk food of sex; it is a complete fantasy, and while some of it may be plausible, the primary reason to watch porn is to see something you're not getting in your everyday life. While a certain amount of such escapism is normal and even healthy, it depicts activities that are typically more fun to do than to watch. A few genres ...


10

In psychology we were taught that imaginary friends are very common from ages 3 through 7, and they occur in ~65% cases (both for boys and girls), so that is nothing extraordinary that one should worry about. However, we were also taught it is important for the child to distinguish between the reality and their imaginary friends. It is healthy if those ...


10

My seven year-old only differentiates time out to about a week. He understands longer time intervals, but just doesn't care. To him, if it's not until next week, it may as well be next year. My four year-old often still says "tomorrow" when she means "sometime in the future." However, if I press her, she will admit she didn't mean tomorrow tomorrow, she ...


10

https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/traits/intelligence I think a loving, healthy home is an excellent foundation. As a special needs teacher, I can tell you that parents might not control how intelligent their child might be, but that a bad influence can and does matter. You can help them achieve their best self. (I am not talking about parents who smoke or do ...


9

Most studies I've found indicates that toddlers will realize that the cute little person in the mirror is them around months 16 - 18, give or take. Free cites: “So Big”: The Development of Body Self-awareness in Toddlers Your Clever Toddler in Week 85: Mirror Recognition Self-Recognition — When Toddlers Know Who That Kid in the Mirror Is Scholarly cites (...


9

I don't know whether it's common or not but my son could certainly do that; he first got into Lego aged 4 and it really clicked with him (in fact he's only just growing out of the Lego obsessed phase now at 14). With him it didn't particularly translate into advanced spatial skills or a design flair or anything like that. He's just an ordinary boy who ...


9

What can I do to a 6 month child so she end up smart and have high IQ? Your child's IQ is what it is. (The constant drive of IQ test developers is to take the child's socio-economic and educational background out of the picture.) The only thing that can change it is damage (via trauma or exposure to certain chemicals). Thus, nothing that any of the other ...


8

Because you care about mathematical concepts and your daughter learning them, most likely she will learn them. You will point them out and talk about them. "see honey, you had one slice of banana, now, you have more slices of banana." You will be drawn to stories that contain math concepts (yes, they are out there) and games that teach mathematical ...


8

I actually assissted in a math classroom for one of my internships to become a teacher. My lead teacher pretty much handed over the control of her "resource class" (those are generally the kids that have the hardest time with math, hate it, and think they don't need it) What I did with them that worked really well, was to present them with a project that ...


8

This is a guess. I'm wondering if it might be a situation where he made the following two, distinct cognitive steps: (1) A while back, he developed the understanding that he could choose things. Make decisions. Affect the outcome. Make his will known, and have it followed. This is a big, important thing to understand, and it gives him control over his ...


8

I found one source that claims 14 to 18 months for long-lasting memory, though without defining "long-lasting". Remembering comes on various levels, though: Specific Daddy turned to page 134. General Daddy read me The Phantom Tollbooth Abstract Daddy read me stories Experiential I loved my time with daddy Ask yourself this: Why will your ...


7

Even I have trouble sometimes comprehending what I am reading while I'm reading it, especially when I am reading aloud, and I'm 30. Often it can be easy to forget to focus on the actual meaning of the passage when reading aloud and just focus on the actual reading. I'd expect this to be even more true for a newer reader. Some people might naturally pay ...


7

Based on my comment on Beofett's post, some would say "well, look at you just defending porn." Yeah? So? Porn -- like sex, drugs, and rock n roll -- is a subject to be discussed with your kids. It's not to be taken lightly or assumed that it'll take care of itself in due course... that's honestly how babies get made. I grew up in suburbia and started ...


7

There are several reasons not to do that: Infants have very simple minds that can easily be overloaded by too much information. A psychedelic, high-contrast video can do more harm than good. Infants develop best, if more/all senses are used together. That is why those famous toys you hang over their beds look funny, play music and are in range for the ...


7

I don't have any real 'evidence' for this, but my nephew used to do the same thing. When he was being potty trained, he would go hide in a corner and poop his pants instead of in the toilet, which baffled us completely. He used to hide when wearing a diaper too. One day though, he walked in on his grandma in the bathroom and asked what she was doing, so she ...


7

For the record I am looking at this question as two different sub question. First question is when do humans gain temporal awareness? and when are they are they able to make sense of this temporal awareness? (I.E when are humans able to construct a meaningful relationship between their temporal awareness and a language). Also, I think I should make this ...


7

No, at 15 months this doesn't make sense. I'd recommend a book with little flaps that show pictures underneath. These are fun for kids that age. Pick a book that shows colors, numbers, animals, etc. Activity books that ask the kid to find objects in the picture are also appropriate. That way parents can say "where is the horse?" and kids learn the words ...


6

This may seem counterintuitive, but babies and small children will do the best at math if they are told stories and learn to tell stories themselves. O'Neille et al. (below) found that storytelling is an essential precursor for the development of logical thinking. This makes sense when you think about the fact that storytelling is ingrained in centuries of ...


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