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10

There exists a UK study dating from 2005, which was updated in 2008. A good summary can be found at the Kimberly-Clark Australia and New Zealand homepage. To summarise the summary: It depends... If you are always washing the fabric diapers at 95 °C and put them in the dryer, the overall energy use will be higher than if you use disposable diapers. If you ...


7

Having used both types of diapers with our kids, I found there are advantages and disadvantages to each. Where cloth diapers have the advantage: Cloth diapers are touted as more environmentally friendly Cloth is often cheaper in the long run Cloth is said to lead to easier eventual potty training (several cloth diaper delivery services such as Happy ...


7

Some babies are extremely sensitive, and will cry about the slightest wetness. Some babies will have a huge soaking blowout in the middle of the night and barely make a peep. We've had both ways. If you're lucky, your baby will be somewhere in between. Newborns wake up to get fed a lot, so generally you'll be just fine if you check the diaper just before ...


6

In general, an hour or two between changes is fairly typical. It takes a while to produce more urine or feces, so you can expect more than 15 minutes before diaper changes. Waiting for the infant to cry is not perfectly reliable, because some children don't seem to mind wet diapers -- my youngest finds a wet diaper to be pure torture, my oldest couldn't ...


6

I tried this but found the ammonia smell wasn't washed out of the diapers when dry. I have a high efficiency washer though so it may have a different outcome if you're using a standard top loader (more water!). Other variables to consider are how sensitive your kids bum is, type of detergent and how smelly their pee is... YMMV. Why not give it a shot?


5

I would be most concerned about the added duration or use that your neighbors may not appreciate. For my routine I have to pre-wash which takes about 1:10 in my machine, followed by a heavy wash with extra rinse which takes another 1:25 in the same machine. After the wash, I also end up drying for two cycles or about 1:15 total dry as the brand I use can ...


5

Newborns need to be checked and changed much more frequently than older babies, simply because they poo more often. For the first few weeks, you can expect some poo in almost every nappy / diaper, and should check every half hour or so if they're awake, probably changing once every 2 or 3 hours. If they're asleep I wouldn't bother waking them up to check / ...


4

As a mother of three (for 20 years) and daycare provider for over 10 years here is the best way that I can answer this, and any other potty training/diaper question. Potty training has NOTHING to do with diapers, cloth or disposable. Potty training is about your individual child's readiness and consistent parental guidance. I've seen so many different ...


4

In China, babies and toddlers wander around without diapers, only a flap in the back of their clothes, even in the coldest winter, in order to quickly do their business. Apparently, they can potty train from as early as two months (hearsay). How could a nation of over a billion people be wrong?


4

An alternative I've seen is gDiapers which are sort of a cross between disposable and cloth diapers. Basically, there is a reusable cover that go along with a disposable insert that fully dissolves in the toilet or go into the compost after use. On their website, there are many videos of the gDiapers in action including this one. We tried them on our son ...


4

From an article by Laura Schmitt for Mothering magazine ("Crazy for cloth: The Benefits of Cotton Diapers." By: Schmitt, Laura, Mothering, 07333013, Jan/Feb2003, Issue 116): "If you opt for a diaper and separate cover, the diaper will not be waterproof, and its main absorbent fabric will be cotton or hemp. It is best to avoid diapers that blend in polyester ...


3

Yes they are much cheaper, my total investment to date is $315, and my son is 14 months old. Prefolds are $1 per diaper in bulk, and I have around 60 of them, and then I bought Thirsties Duo covers at $10 per cover, which I have 10 of. You only change the cover if it gets soiled by a BM, or after a full day of use. I also use Kawaii diapers for day care, ...


3

I also think it depends on your living situation. For our family, our unit doesn't have laundry so at $2 a load to wash and then $2 to try it is not even close. I even used a cloth vs disposable diaper calculator to test out my theory and I am correct http://www.groceryalerts.ca/cloth-vs-disposable-diaper-calculator/. Assuming cost of 20 cents per ...


3

The root cause may be that the baby is more sensitive to wet diapers, and therefore holds back. Cloth diapers generally feel more wet than disposables from the same amount of fluid; disposables are designed to draw all the moisture away and bind it in gels. There are probably only a few options, none of which seem really great to me: Go back to disposables....


3

We have gone through two girls using cloth nappies (diapers). Our current procedure is basically: Rinse used nappies by hand as necessary to get most of the poo off Toss them in a bucket, which may or may not contain enough water to soak them (the bucket lives in our shower, which is next to the washer and easy to isolate by closing the shower door) Every ...


2

Try Elimination Communication. Offer opportunities to use the bathroom At opportunistic times (after naps, half an hour after bottle/breastfeeding, before meals, before and after car rides, etc.) When your baby has a worried (deer-in-headlights) look on his/her face When your baby is gassy, has low appetite, or is making grunting noises You general ...


2

If you live in or near a major city, there are a lot of cloth diaper delivery services that will manage pickup/delivery/cleaning of cloth diapers, saving you a lot of the hassle. Dirty diapers go in a bin, get picked up and replaced with clean ones by the service once a week. We used Happy Nappy for our first child, and it was just as easy as disposables (...


2

Yes ... having a 3 month old and a newly potty trained 2 and a half year old , I notticed how much eaiser the cloth diapers were with the breast fed baby. Once they are on solids you need to rinse .


2

Based on Vicky's comment to just try it, and in response to Guillaume's comment/question, I did try to put the ~15 diapers through a single wash cycle, and there is some residual smell compared to diapers which are put through a single wash cycle with ~15 diapers, then washed a second time with other laundry to make a full laundry load. Using two wash cycles ...


2

Since first rinse is only done to wash out urine and poop, and later you wash it again more thoroughly with clothes, you don't really need any detergent for that first wash. Baking soda is enough of a detergent to do the job any way... I used to rinse off any poop left on the diapers (what slipped off the liners) and then simply throw them in with the ...


2

We use cloth diapers for our son and mostly it's been a positive experience. Chris has outlined nicely the positives and negatives of cloth and disposable in his answer so I just want to add some advice if you do decide to use cloth. We were given as a gift a sample of different cloth diapers from a many several manufacturers. I think there were about 10 ...


2

It depends on how much you use them! If you use them at all times - certainly. But if you're like us, it's quite likely you won't. We originally got MamaBless cloth diapers with bambino mio diaper covers and flushable liners. We like them a lot - mostly because they're just nicer than the plastic kind. We also hope that they will help speed up toilet ...


2

The best method that seems to work for me is to soak the poopy clothes in hot water and 1/2 scoop Vanish stain remover. After that I just put it in Washing Machine with 2 caps of Dettol (disinfectant) and without adding any detergent. The hot water seems to take away the stains very fast. The hot water does the trick most of the time even without the stain ...


2

A 2005 study by Britain’sEnvironment Agency (which has now been lost from my browser bookmarks) took into account some of these technological advances. In making their calculations regarding cloth diapers, the study used average energy-consumption figures for machines made in 1997. They concluded that there was “no significant difference” between the ...


2

I actually used cloth diapers for my son because I find it cheaper compared with using diapers. Even if you have to wash the cloth diapers and spend for water, detergent and so on, you can still use cloth diapers in a longer run which will make it cheaper, compared with diapers. Newborn babies also tend to pee a lot, so a diaper can only lasts for four ...


2

I don't know if there are specific or recomended rules of thumb for this, but we have been using the same brand of diapers as you for our son since he was 2 months old (he's now nearly 19 months) and had similar problems with leaking. When he was your son's age, we had three buttons open in the middle and he leaked through during the night approximately 75% ...


2

When I bought ours, I bought them lightly used (don't judge. =]). That means I tried a few brands. The ones I likeds best are the one size fits all. Our boy just turned one and we have been using bumGenius since we ran out of disposables that were given to us. And the doctor just told us he's about the size of an average two year old. If I could have, I ...


2

I've cloth diapered two of my three kids. No one way, one type of diaper/cover arrangement is best. It changes with the age of he child, your child's "build" (long and lean vs chubby) and the situation (night vs day, car rides vs playing outside). Sorry, but it's not as simple as 'sposies (disposable diapers). But, it is worth the effort, both physical and ...


1

I totally agree with Chris' answer: "It has to fit in with your lifestyle." In my experience your lifestyle will probably change dramatically once the child is born. At least that's what happened to us. You sleep less and have a lot of things to think about. So while we were getting used to the new lifestyle we simply used disposables. We weren't sure how ...


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