9

First, not every section that happens after labour begins is an emergency C section. In an emergency section, the cut is vertical and large, and everyone is in kind of a panic. You might get a general if you don't have an epidural already in place. These things have a bigger impact on you. In a "normal" section, the cut is low, horizontal, and relatively ...


8

If you feel you aren't being heard by your birth team, and there's time, I would strongly recommend seeking out a second opinion or an advocate to help you BE heard. Do you have the option of finding a doula? Having a doula helped me tremendously in my first pregnancy, as I was bucking the medical establishment in my birth plan. If you do not feel you ...


5

I had a c-section at 37 weeks because I was preeclamptic. My initial birth plan was to do the Bradley Method, a natural vaginal birth. One of the greatest things I learned while pregnant was that your plan is a great ideal but not necessarily what ends up happening when it's time to give birth. I kept an open mind and had an absolutely amazing c-section. I ...


5

My question is: how do I respectfully handle this with the midwife and the hospital? How do I tactfully make them fully aware that I'm not paranoid, this is a genuine risk? Your midwife has done many deliveries, and if you're satisfied with her care so far, since there is no way to predict your need for a C-Section (even pelvimetry Xrays most likely won't ...


3

There's not a lot of ways to know if you'll need a c-section or not before delivery. If your baby is breech, or if the placenta is too low, or other conditions then a c-section is basically required for a safe delivery, but apart from obvious indications, there's not a way to know for sure. I have two cousins who had c-sections, they had no idea they were ...


2

Giving birth naturally puts a huge strain on your body and is exhausting, and having an operation also puts a huge strain on your body and is exhausting. Having both one after the other is a significant strain and takes a lot longer to recover from. This is why many women who have a high potential for a c-section will opt for an elective rather than try to ...


1

I believe there are more factors to the health and intelligence of children than the way they arrive in this world. I personally was one of those mothers that wanted to be like every other woman and have a normal delivery, but my body is a carrier, not a deliverer. It was emotionally hard facing the fact that I would never be able to experience a normal ...


1

In the sense that both methods' outcome is a happy, healthy mom and baby, the difference is none. Babies who are born vaginally receive crucial beneficial bacteria from their mother's birth canal that are necessary to populate the gut. This could explain why there is growing evidence that babies born via c-section are more likely to develop asthma and ...


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