27

Honestly, if it was my toddler I would either just brush top teeth - carefully - or skip a day or two. That type of injury in a little child usually heals extremely quickly, and I think the long term goals of healthy dental hygiene will be set back more by causing some pain in the hurt lip and accidentally reinforcing that brushing teeth is an undesirable ...


5

See first of all you should make sure whether all his teeth are alright from the trauma. Just check if any tooth is not moving or is painful to touch. If you are in doubt then you must take your son to the dentist to rule out a tooth fracture. Because if there is a crack in tooth then that crack may invite infections and later on so many complications. And ...


3

In addition to practicing with water, what helped us was to use a 'big kid' or 'adult' toothpaste - one that tasted of mint. We found that the little kids bubble gum ones he wanted to eat, but the minty stuff he wanted to spit out. If you check, you can see that the kids toothpaste actually have the same fluoride content as adult ones - at least the ones ...


3

I don't know how logical your two-year-old is, but here's what worked for my son: I explained to him that some foods make your teeth sick, and if we don't scrub them off then your teeth will eventually fall out. I told him that if he couldn't be a good helper and let mama brush his teeth, then we wouldn't be able to eat those foods anymore. Then I told him ...


2

My daughter is 2 and 3 months. We had been having problems with manual toothbrushes, so I was advised to use an electric one because they are more "fun" (I have never have an electric toothbrush so at first I did not get the fun part). I bought an electric toothbrush for her and it was an amazing experience. On the warnings at the back of the toothbrush it ...


2

My 16-year-old son, who is a nonverbal autistic, has spitting problem since he was a child. We tried showing him every possible way to spit out anything that is in his mouth, but he wouldn’t spit out. When it comes to food, he would be gagging if it is just a little bigger than a bite size. Still he would not spit out. One thing that helps with brushing ...


2

Disclaimer: I'm not a parent, so this is not based on experience. Since deworde already answered the question about when to brush teeth, I want to add a possible solution to your other question: How do we handle this dilemma? Dental hygiene is important to you, but you are reluctant to wake your infant up after the nighttime bottle. And after drinking ...


2

I think first you need to check why the child does not want to brush his teeth? Since he is two years old, he might resist anything to prove that he is in charge. They do these things when the parents show some kind of inconsistency. In that case, you need to work on boundaries and maybe you can brush your teeth together with all family. So he will join and ...


1

It is not crucial to brush with toothpaste every single day; skipping a day once in a while is fine. One way to deal with a cut on the lip is to use one (washed) hand to hold that lip, covering the cut with the soft part of the thumb/finger, while using the other hand to brush whatever is easy to brush, just with plain water. This keeps the teeth relatively ...


1

When my 5yr old got hit by a swing in the teeth, the dentist said to always brush the teeth! But gently. The germs in the mouth can cause more problems. They also suggested to use mouthwash in case of difficulties. When in doubt ask a dentist.


1

As some of the comments have already stated, perhaps this is not an issue with bad breath originating in the oral cavity. This is no cause for immediate alarm but please bring it up with the child's doctor. Bad breath can result from issues occurring from the stomach. You may notice that after a burp, breath stinks. This doesn't occur because of poor ...


1

You wouldn't normally "need" to clean your baby's tongue. Unlike with their teeth, plaque doesn't usually cause any harm on the tongue. If your baby's breath smells fine, then you don't need to worry. Some children never really get much plaque on their tongues. Our daughter is 6, and we've never found it necessary to clean her tongue. However with our son, ...


1

If you kids age is 3, then start teaching him how to brush his/her teeth with a manual toothbrush. They won't be able to brush on the first day. Keep teaching them and hopefully, after a couple of days, your kid will be able to brush his own teeth. Here's an article that can help: When is your kid ready for a toothbrush? A useful quote from that site: Well, ...


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