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51

First, a note: I am not speaking to whether this is a correct choice on your part on her behalf; I would encourage you to ask that as a separate question. If you have concerns about a particular assignment, you have a few options. Your first and best option is to speak to the child's teacher. Bring up your specific concerns, as to why you believe this ...


32

So it looks like you have two questions, how to foster a love of reading and how to get your son to start reading more reading-level appropriate books (that phrasing was chosen carefully, I'll get to that in a moment). As far as fostering a love of reading goes, it sounds to me like your son already has that. If he enjoys reading, no matter the book, that ...


20

I've had similar reservations about books chosen by my child's teacher, and in every case it's been better to reserve judgement until after the child has at least sampled the book. Some books that I thought was fine have been disturbing to the child and some books I was worried about turned out to be fine. If possible read the book ahead of the child and be ...


18

Your son sounds like my son! A few years ago I went through the same struggle. Bright kid, reading way above grade level, but spends all of his time reading Dogman and Captain Underpants. Tried a bunch of books that I loved, brick wall. He'd read a page or two and then back to the Captain. By now, he reads "text" books all the time. Not ...


8

Continue with your practice of encouraging your son to read, and have patience. Reading to him, buying books and going together to the library to borrow books are all great ways to help develop reading skills. Just be patient. Your child will "graduate" to books with text content when he is ready. To encourage reading books with text content, cast ...


5

You say you already read to your son at night. One option would be to read to him, but then say you've had enough and put the book down just as its getting exciting, and leave him to read on if he wants.


4

This addresses only one aspect of @Becuzz's excellent answer, and @Paul Johnson suggested it (albeit very briefly.) So, nothing new here, just fleshing it out. My first child was reluctant to move from easy reads to more demanding ones. This is how the problem was dealt with: I bought a series of books in a subject that I knew he would love. (I knew what he ...


3

When I read your question, my first reaction is "What's wrong with the world today?": You mention that your child is about twelve years old, and her teacher makes her read a book about children being enslaved into war criminals, children being eaten by lions, bombings, burnings, ... machetes, ... When I was that age, my teachers let me read books ...


2

I must say I agree with Joe, about talking to the teacher first. I can not imagine a teacher that would force reading of certain material onto a child, having trouble with anxiety and the like as you describe. It should be possible to find a solution, and contact to the teacher should of course be first move. But, sometimes - if reason fails to work - my ...


2

Great job getting the foundation set up to prepare your son for reading! While I was doing some searching online, I too saw a ton of expensive workbooks meant for teachers however, there is a really good line of workbooks on amazon by the "I am going to read" series. I recommend checking those out to start. Good luck!


1

I want to maybe touch on something else, that kind of ties into expanding reading avenues outside of "text" based novels, but I've not seen covered. Have you tried getting your son interested in any non-fiction? I was a child who struggled to muster interest in reading books, and my parents managed to get around this by buying me non-fiction in ...


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