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79

This book works differently for people at different stages of their lives. The lesson for young children reading this book, I believe, is about unconditional love. Children need to know and trust that their parents will always be there for them, loving them without question, even if they need them their whole lives. You could say to your young child, "I'm ...


71

First, to make them enjoy books: Read to your children Without competition the most important aspect. Your kids enjoy spending time with you, so they'll love when you read to them. Make sure you read to them every day. Include it in the bedtime routine, but also read to them in the daytime, when the ambition isn't for them to fall asleep, but to listen to ...


56

So it looks like you have two questions, how to foster a love of reading and how to get your son to start reading more reading-level appropriate books (that phrasing was chosen carefully, I'll get to that in a moment). As far as fostering a love of reading goes, it sounds to me like your son already has that. If he enjoys reading, no matter the book, that ...


50

First, a note: I am not speaking to whether this is a correct choice on your part on her behalf; I would encourage you to ask that as a separate question. If you have concerns about a particular assignment, you have a few options. Your first and best option is to speak to the child's teacher. Bring up your specific concerns, as to why you believe this ...


26

Your son sounds like my son! A few years ago I went through the same struggle. Bright kid, reading way above grade level, but spends all of his time reading Dogman and Captain Underpants. Tried a bunch of books that I loved, brick wall. He'd read a page or two and then back to the Captain. By now, he reads "text" books all the time. Not ...


26

First off, I'd recommend you change your language some. "How do I make my kids..." never ends well. Your kids are their own people, and they'll choose to like, or not like, things; trying to "make them" like things is a fool's errand that will more often than not make them dislike that thing. However, I've been where you are. I wanted ...


20

I've had similar reservations about books chosen by my child's teacher, and in every case it's been better to reserve judgement until after the child has at least sampled the book. Some books that I thought was fine have been disturbing to the child and some books I was worried about turned out to be fine. If possible read the book ahead of the child and be ...


16

The lesson in The Giving Tree is not from the tree's point of view. It is from the boy's. The reader will more immediately identify with the boy, after all (if a child, in particular) - and so the lesson is to be aware of people giving to you, and be grateful for it, rather than continually demanding. The boy doesn't feel happy, after all, until the end - ...


15

A Tale of Two Children I have two boys, both grown now, but they were very different. We read to them every night, multiple books, and they both loved being read to. However, when the older one came to reading age he simply wasn't interested at all. We sat with him incessantly, reading with him, taking him to the library, doing everything we could. In ...


13

You are entering the "flood state" of childrearing. At least, that's what we dubbed it at our house: As the child gains more and more "upward mobility", the lower levels of shelves get emptier, valuable items "float upwards". Rest assured: This too will pass. Meanwhile, the empty shelves make a good place for toddler toys. ^_^ (But if you are considering a ...


13

You don't have to avoid them. I read (and listened to) many of these fairy stories when I was young and the child's mind does not take in the same details than an adult one might. In fact, I'm now in my late 20s and this is the first time I've realised that these books treat stealing like this. By the time children really have the attention span to listen ...


12

The only thing that really matters is that you read with her regularly as part of a bedtime or playtime routine. If you find a way to make the laptop work for you so that you both can read it together comfortably before bed, that is excellent. Books themselves are so much less important than enjoying reading that it doesn't even compare. There is no harm at ...


12

There are many, many fictional tales that your child will encounter while growing up. Some are in books, some are in other media (TV, movies), some are cultural (e.g. the Tooth Fairy), some will be games that children and their friends make up. Even observing the world on her own can lead to the impression that there's something magical going on (sunrise! ...


10

Fifteen months is early even for 100% picture books. It's far too early for understanding a storyline - it's too early for the level of imagination capable of understanding that there could be such a thing as a story. Most fifteen month olds aren't interested in books except as a very short and quick interaction with daddy/mommy. They probably aren't ...


10

A 15 month old not only cannot read, but doesn't yet know that those black marks on the paper are words, or that what you are saying is somehow controlled by what is on the paper. This is something they need to learn, and they learn it in modern society through picture-only, no-text books. These are typically heavy cardboard so the toddler doesn't wreck them ...


10

This sounds like pretty normal 15 month old "GOOD LORD I CAN MOVE MYSELF THIS IS AWESOME", but if it's truly looking out of control, you might want to consider talking to your paediatrician, just as a check. I think we do have a few questions on hyperactivity on the site. As far as the reading goes, children generally want to mimic their parents. My ...


10

Continue with your practice of encouraging your son to read, and have patience. Reading to him, buying books and going together to the library to borrow books are all great ways to help develop reading skills. Just be patient. Your child will "graduate" to books with text content when he is ready. To encourage reading books with text content, cast ...


10

Children see, children do. When they hang out with you, or even nearby you, read a lot of books. When they look interested, show them what you're reading and talk to them about it. Make silly faces and voices as you read the books out loud. Name one of the characters after your children or anyone they know well. Then, to capture their interest even without ...


10

I can't beat the existing best answer! But to add a few more points... Don't underestimate the value of pictures If your children are too young to read, the pictures help the child stay with the story, whilst you read the words. The really good ones, like Axel Scheffler for Julia Donaldson's books, add extra depth to the story. And you can involve the child ...


9

Regarding the second point, the idea is that it teaches the child to do things in an appropriate setting. Instead of spitting inside, we go outside into the garden and have a game there. It's about positive reinforcement of what you wanted to say anyway. If our kids start chucking stuff around, we tell them that they can go outside and do that which is fine ...


9

I asked a friend of mine who is a literacy education professor this same question. (My son just started kindergarten and tested in the middle of second grade for reading, and is moving up rapidly.) She offered this professional advice: Congratulations! What it amounts to is that your son already has strong skills for decoding text and has many strategies ...


9

I think this book describes the relationship between mother nature and humans, and quite accurately too. We use the earth in exactly that way. We mine oil, harvest lumber, drive cars, just use, use, use, often without giving the source a second thought. And the earth simply allows us to take. I do not think it models human-human relationships at all, and ...


9

The Giving Tree, like any creative fiction, is open to interpretation. That's the beauty of it. People have interpreted it as you did, and even as satire--not a children's book at all. Some think the tree is God. You see what I mean? It sounds like your son enjoys it, but you're looking for someone to refute your own adult interpretation of it. The problem ...


9

First off, you definitely will find that if you're consistent with your child, she will learn to leave things alone, mostly, that aren't that interesting and she's been asked not to touch, in most cases. However, there are a few steps you can take to improve your odds. Move the bookcases away from areas that she primarily spends her time in. This can be ...


8

At two, while you certainly can begin working on alphabet and numerals and counting, I tend to feel that the most important things are creativity, emotions, and breadth of experience. By breadth of experience I mean to encounter a lot of different things, such that not only can the child learn about new concepts, vocabulary, cultures, and ideas, but the ...


8

This addresses only one aspect of @Becuzz's excellent answer, and @Paul Johnson suggested it (albeit very briefly.) So, nothing new here, just fleshing it out. My first child was reluctant to move from easy reads to more demanding ones. This is how the problem was dealt with: I bought a series of books in a subject that I knew he would love. (I knew what he ...


8

To answer your first question, comic books are fine to introduce your children to reading. Our approach was "whatever works best" and we used a variety of book types and reading-related games. In general: Reduce screen time to a minimum. This will free up some time for more productive activities, such as reading and free play. See also ...


7

Emergent Readers This is actually fairly easy for emergent readers because there are plenty of "leveled" books for them such as Frog and Toad, and Owl at Home. Early readers are labeled by the publishing company as being part of a series of steps clearly explained somewhere on the book. The "I Can Read" system, for example, has books labeled as "My First" ...


7

We've started trying to bring the stories alive by acting the stories and using props and toys. For example: We're Going on a Bear Hunt - Searching the house for different "animals" i.e. stuffed toys. We ask what the animal sounds like, what it looks like and where does it live. A hidden iPod with speakers can add to the realism (Or dad doing his best ...


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