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14

Your sister has a real problem. This is the kind of behaviour that she should have left behind at preschool. Is she violent towards others or just you? If she has more general violence issues then I suggest talking to a professional counsellor or therapist. Your parents ought to be doing this of course, but if they won't then you may have to step in. She is,...


11

At four, there's not a lot of point in "later" punishments. Your child isn't thinking about long term consequences; she is acting in the moment, primarily. Issues like biting need to be handled in two parts. One, they need to be handled in situ when they occur. That's going to be up to the daycare/school, of course, and you might want to talk to them ...


10

Toddlers this age (and younger) bite. That's just a fact. Most of them outgrow it fairly unceremoniously. They bite for a number of reasons, three of which are 1) reaction, 2) attention, and 3) frustration. Usually this frustration stems from not being able to "use their words" to adequately express their frustration. To combat this, show him all the time ...


9

At 7 months, the various responses are unlikely to have that much affect, so while your wife could try removal from the breast / firm no / etc the problem will have probably fixed itself before they work. The key is to pay attention to the change in latch which usually signifies baby is going to bite (babies can't bite while latched properly - the tongue ...


8

At that age you are going to have a hard time teaching a child to fight back appropriately. There's too much nuance in when it's ok vs when it isn't (even adults debate this) for a 14 month old to fully grasp. You are going to be far better served dealing with it yourself. Protect the children, separate them, console them. If they can't be trusted ...


6

First off, she probably is teething to some degree. Kids generally have at least mild teething from 9 months or so to 15 months, at a minimum. Not to say they're in pain, but chewing/gumming feels good to them, just like it does sometimes to adults who have mild tooth issues. Unless she's breaking the skin, I would let her do this. If it's not breaking ...


6

The main way that worked for us was any time he bites, take him away and don't let him feed for a few minutes. If he continues, actually put him down on the floor for a few minutes. Say something while you're doing it so he knows what's going on - don't get mad or yell, just tell him "No thank you, biting hurts. Mommy doesn't like that." They usually ...


6

Attempting to reason with a child of this age is FUTILE. I'll be vilified by child-protection advocates for this answer, but here goes: bite back! Clearly, the child has little or no idea of the painful effect of his actions -- NOT HIS FAULT, he's simply not at a stage of development where these effects register to him as such. He may bite out of frustration,...


5

Biting must be taken seriously. The site Bugs provided is excellent, so I will repeat it here Biting is a very common behavior among toddlers, which means there are a lot of concerned parents out there. You are not alone. The good news is that there is a lot that parents and caregivers can do to reduce and, ultimately, eliminate biting. To set ...


5

Biting is tough; my oldest went through a stage at just over a year and it was very difficult to train him out of it. It took around four months to get him to stop; he just didn't understand it was wrong, even with books, 'Ouch, Biting Hurts', giving more attention to the bitee, etc. Biting at three is a bit different, though. A three year old has some (...


5

Based on your comments, I would still focus on trying to get him to teeth on teething rings or other similar toys. Get that redirection going and pretty soon he won't be interested in your fingers anymore. In the meantime though, there are some steps you can take to make sure he understands it's not OK. Nobody laugh. It's funny. Everyone gets that; the baby ...


5

As you have not provided much info, this answer is somewhat based on conjecture. It sounds as if your child is neuroatypical. Whatever the condition, he does not like the feeling he experiences (either physical or psychological) when someone hugs or touches him. For some reason, he doesn't welcome touch, and he 'fights back' when someone violates his space. ...


4

I assume that this is just "a thing" between the two of you and she behaves reasonably non-violent against other people. If that's not the case, the answer would be quite different. Most likely she does this to get attention and a strong reaction out of you. It may help to respond in a way that doesn't meet her goal and shows that this is kind of silly. ...


4

The literature strongly suggests that caregivers and parents not bite the child back as a punishment or to show the child how it feels to be bitten. Biting back communicates to the child that violence is acceptable (Claffey, Kucharski, & Gratz, 1994; Garcia, 1999; NAEYC, 1996). Because theorists think that biting may be related to the child's ...


3

I think you are making a mistake by focusing on punishment. Your goal is a better response to frustration. Punishment might be a part of your plan, but then again, it might not. You need as much information as you can get about what led up to the problem an how the school handled it. Then you need to work with your daughter to react in an appropriate way. ...


3

I have watched biters & had one of my own be a biter. This is what has helped me most. Firstly, for me the only biters I had were non-talkers. I think this is very normal from speaking to others, researching it myself. It really is a communication. It might be one we do not prefer, but it is a communication/expression. It is more useful to stop ...


3

Generally if a child is biting it's either because they're teething or they're upset. Given your comments I would guess that he is biting the other child because he is jealous. Is he an only child? Has he had much interaction with other children while in your care? If your baby-sitting Stephanie's child is a relatively new thing, or if it happens more in ...


3

I'm going to offer a counter to the "bite back" suggestion. I affirm, it is a developmental stage and rationalization is likely not possible at that age. When I was nursing and biten, a loud firm "no" and abruptly ended the nursing session. I never entertained "cute" biting and kept a serious face, and sometimes acted more hurt than I felt. The response ...


3

I know this won't be a popular answer, but it worked when my friends three year old was biting. Sometimes natural consequences is the best teacher. My daughter, the same age, had had enough. While we were driving out for some activity, so I was unable to respond without parking the car, instead of screaming for help and letting the adult take care of it, ...


2

This is completely normal at 20 months. Your daycare should have a strategy to remind him that he doesn't bite and distract him and to also look out for situations in which he is likely to bite in order to avoid them. At home, if he bites you, I'd say "ow that hurt. teeth are for eating." If you are holding your child when they bite, I'd put them down for ...


2

We used the exaggeration of consequences treatment with our son when he went through this. A huge and loud "OW! That hurts!" followed by an immediate time-out addressed the situation at home in just a few iterations. He has never bitten anyone other than me or his father, though; he started with us when he was just over 15 months, and I'm guessing he didn'...


2

My son also received some serious bite marks as a toddler, and he learned to do the same. We made sure to tell him at every given situation that biting is wrong and he must speak up when it happens (daytime caregivers did the same). Thankfully he learned that biting and hitting is never okay, even in defense, and it always works to speak up, to move away ...


2

I mostly agree with anongoodnurse's answer (+1 from me), and would add: Between 2 and 4 is the phase where children learn to deal with the frustration of not getting something they want, and where they can be very demanding, impulsive, and sometimes violent. However, that doesn't mean they are evil or mean. They just have to learn how to do that thing ...


2

My daughter has been bitten a couple of times, including once in the playground while waiting behind a boy to go off the slide. (I include this example to show the problem (and thus solution) are not limited to the kindergarten.) I felt that the best solution would be if my daughter learned to stand up for herself a little better and in particular how to ...


2

The best thing I can suggest to make a difference now, is to role play it! Act out the situations over and over and have him rehearse how he is expected to react. I explain to my daughter that feelings are like clouds (we look at the clouds as we're having this conversation, and we've had it hundreds of times). They come and go, they are always moving, and ...


2

According to this article from healthychildren.org (an American Academy of Pediatricians site): Around 3 months of age, babies will begin exploring the world with their mouth and have increased saliva and start to put their hands in their mouth. Many parents question whether or not this means that their baby is teething, but a first tooth usually appears ...


1

For breastfeeding you can use nipple protectors (or even take the top of a bottle (the baby feed kind of bottles) and cut a hole in it) Many kids that age go though a stage of wanting to explore the world. And they do explore with their mouth. Biting seems to be a natural part of that experience. I do recommend bite toys (especially those you put in the ...


1

LINK WebMD LINK I liked what both these sites had to say. I'd try re-direction and a firm 'NO, we do not bite. It hurts." Then I would also try to make up a picture symbol board that allows your children to share how they are feeling. Cut simple pictures from magazines or copy images from the web. Post them in a prominent, reachable spot. Use the board to ...


1

Your interesting question sent me looking for empirical basis for the advice not to bite the child who has bitten someone. I've found it challenging to trace this back to empirical work. A featured article published in 2011 by the American Psychological Association, Biting questions, stated: One intervention to absolutely avoid is biting children back, ...


1

It can be rather difficult for a parent to address a problem that arises in school, and even more so when the child is quite young and may not be able to describe what is occurring at school, and how s/he is experiencing school. If you have time to do a little fly-on-the-wall observing of your child's functioning in school, that might be helpful. In ...


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