52

L is now so habituated to weeing at this time of night that she basically doesn't wake up at all during the process. When we talk to her about it, she denies any knowledge of it happening at all... So first step, stop carrying her. Wake her, as gently as you can, and make her walk herself to the bathroom. I would pick a weekend to start this process, as ...


19

We recently crossed this bridge with our 5 year old. My wife and I miscommunicated who was taking her for a pee, neither of us did and there was no accident. After figuring out what happened the next day, we just rolled with it. After a few months with zero accidents, last week we took the pee pad off of her bed. So "stop doing it and suck up the handful ...


13

Three ideas (one you might not like, but if it works...): Make sure he goes to the bathroom just before bed. Did wonders for our daughter. Try some higher-absorbency pullups. Since he's almost 6, maybe move to GoodNights or something similar for older kids with bladder control issues. You might just be overloading the capacity of the diaper. If you can ...


10

It's totally normal Don't worry. Many children do experience setbacks like this. It's totally normal, only to be expected, and almost certainly temporary. Keep calm, don't give a payoff My eldest had this problem when he was 4. Here's what we did. If he wee'd in the night, we just kept everything super calm and changed everything, all the sheets and ...


10

You are dream weeing at 10 pm. Every day, move it 1 minute earlier. 9:59 pm tomorrow, 9:58 pm the next day, etc. If it takes longer for her to dream wee, pause at that time until it happens reliably. Then start moving again. As the dream wee moves closer to her bed time (a month or two away), start restricting liquids close to bed time. Move it back at ...


9

Bed wetting, even at 7 years old, is common. About 1 in 40 children at that age wet the bed. Children usually grow out of it. Stop waking her in the night. That doesn't help. Make sure she is drinking plenty in the day time. This will help her train her bladder. She should reduce the amount she drinks in the evenings. Make going to the loo last thing ...


9

Some useful steps we used: Try to move her liquid intake earlier in the day - sounds like you have been trying to do this, but it is what will really make a difference at this age Make sure she visits the toilet just before bed - possibly encourage her to do this both before and after cleaning her teeth. Sometimes trying twice can help a child relatively ...


8

Aside from some physiological or psychological factor another thing to consider is that during potty training you probably (if you were like us) followed a very specific bedtime routine. No water after x:00pm, pee before bedtime etc. After our now 5 year old was all trained, we started to get a little lax on the routine. Sure you can have a drink, I will ...


7

We had a similar situation. We survived. Most nights are dry now. Let me get the bad news out first: There are a few children that will be bed-wetting until their teens. A few. Very, very few. We had a similar problem and worked closely with our trusted pediatrician. There is one thing to keep in mind: Dry nights are a combination of reduced urine ...


6

My wife is the school nurse at an outdoor school (sixth grade camp) and this problem is very common among the sixth graders (10-11 year olds) she sees. They've developed procedures so these kids can attend successfully without the other kids knowing. As annoying as this is, it will pass. Adding shame, even unintentionally, will help nothing and hurt a lot.


6

Frankly you will be told by any professional that you should not. This is what we were told with our first 3. Over the years what we have learnt is this: limit the consumption of liquids, especially water at 6pm. By 7pm and before bed, he should be taken for a pee - this should be a ritual from now on. Thus you would have to build a motivational ...


5

It is certainly not a willful behaviour at this age, especially in the middle of the night. So it won't help to explain your expectations, it will just frustrate her more. Was there any substantial change lately in the child's life? E.g. birth of younger sibling, starting kindergarten / preschool, problems in kindergarten / preschool, mom / dad starting / ...


5

I sleep in the same room as my 4 year old son while my wife sleeps with our 6 month old. One pattern that I have noticed is that he will start to cry out in his sleep and get very restless when he needs to go pee. I will then wake him up and ask him if he needs to go pee. It can be hard to get him awake enough to answer the question and sometimes he gets ...


5

Only anecdotal, but a counter-argument to those who say that by waking him you are encouraging him to be dependent on you to stay dry - we used to take my son to the toilet in the night until he was about 7 and stopped needing it of his own accord. The hormonal changes required to slow down urine production at night don't kick in very early in some children, ...


5

I don't know if this helps or is relevant, but I sometimes drink because I cycle -- some days I arrive home, and most of my skin is coated with salt, as well as wet (from sweating). IMO I retain or don't retain water, and pee more or less, depending on how much salt I have (I add salt to my drink). Adults are warned to beware of salt: they can have too much; ...


4

If your child is often wetting the bed at night, he is likely not ready to be sleeping without a diaper or pull-ups. From PubMed Health (US National Library of Medicine): Nighttime bladder and bowel control develops somewhat more slowly. So, even once your child is dry during the daytime, it can take a while before they notice in their sleep that they ...


4

First of all night time: A child has no control at night until his body does it for him, so stopping the diapers at night is just going to bother him and you. My 4 year old daughter (girls usually have control at an early age then boys) still needs a diaper at night and the pediatrician says they don't worry about it until age 6 and even then don't do ...


4

This is very common. Make sure drinks are done an hour before bedtime and the toilet gets used every night, last thing. Get a waterproof mattress pad and extra sheets, and change them when you need to. It's important that you don't dump a bucket of shame on the kid. She's not doing it on purpose. Try to laugh. This too shall pass.


4

Well, urine has 2 characteristics to consider: Presence of bacteria Acidity For a long time the concept of urine being sterile in non-sick individuals has been well-known. Recent research indicates that that may not be the case. However, if you're sick, you won't make yourself more sick by being exposed to yourself. So, if things are cleaned up in a ...


4

My younger son struggled with night-time wetting until he was 14. In his younger years, we weren't too worried about it; I had several friends who assured me he would grow out of it. He was a VERY heavy sleeper, and even if I went in to wake him for a bathroom break in the middle of the night, he didn't really wake up. I actually stopped doing that after I ...


4

It's good you are looking out for your brother! Hey, tell him don't worry about it... he'll grow out of it someday. Lots of kids do that, and boys are notorious. So, don't worry about, just put some things in place to protect him and the bed, like a protective cover, and some towels, etc. Then, make sure no more fluids after a certain time (depending on ...


4

My daughter had the problem of wetting the bed at night long after she was able to stay dry during the day. We also noticed that having wet the bed did not wake her up. So we bought an alarm that was two sheets of "paper" with holes and an metal layer coating. Between the two metal layers you put a piece of paper. You'd clip a lead to each of the metal ...


3

At the request of the OP I have added this as an answer and deleted the comment. I would like offer an alternative to the maxi pad suggestion: try wool long underwear. I have a heavy wetter (not toilet trained yet, but still...) and I had the same laundry issue as you. And it isn't easy changing crib sheets either, so I feel your pain. Anyway, you can find ...


3

Tangential answer because I don't have comment rights: Perhaps you should look at how his diet influences his night time peeing? I recently noticed that if I limit my carbs in the evening to slow starches, then I'm not as thirsty and I don't sweat at night. (so no sugary goods or even fruit juice, just potatoes, rice, that kind of thing - for me that boils ...


3

At 3yo she may not be ready to be 100% toilet trained. My daughter took a lot longer than that before she could reliably go through the night without wetting herself. The body can just take a while to develop the necessary feedback loop. We tried all the things Rory mentioned, including midnight toilet runs. Didn't help. She was ready when she was ready. ...


3

I think the answers so far are not reading the question. It's not about moving on from nappies, but how to stop the nappy pant leaking. I would look at different brands. The cut and size can make a difference. The clothing worn make a a difference too. Trousers will keep the pants in place. With a good waterproof mattress protectors it needn't be a big ...


3

I have four kids. My youngest two (twin boys) are four, my daughter is six and my son is seven. Of the four, my youngest son (youngest by two minutes) has absolutely no problems staying dry through the night. I honestly don't remember the last time he had an accident. His twin brother is the exact opposite and always needs diapers/pull-ups at night. My ...


3

My son was a bed wetter until he was 8 and his father and I split. I mean it stopped as soon as he left. Maybe stress?


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