40

If you have OCD, then this might be the intrusive thoughts of OCD, as there is a genetic component to it. However, diagnosing kids this young is difficult, and it's not at all uncommon that kids with a psychiatric diagnosis at one point are found a few years later to have been misdiagnosed. So... time will tell. As someone with OCD, you are in the perfect ...


14

Following from my comment. Your older daughter has been the apple of your eye, until recently. She has had centre stage, with no rivals. Now she has one - a 3 mth old sibling, who, understandably (for us) is now the 'star'. She doesn't appreciate the situation, but does inderstand the things which get adults' attention. She's using those to gain back at ...


9

Six is certainly an age to have a conversation about seeing things through, and make a plan together. Decide what's an acceptable outcome for you, and talk to him about what is important to him. I've had roughly the same kind of conversation with my six year old, who decided he wanted to play violin and take a ballet class instead of some other activities. ...


8

Sure they can. It depends on how the parents raise them and their level of interactivity with the subject. My older daughter was about 2 or 3 when I started telling her my own recollection of the story of the predator. Yes, that Schwarzenegger film. Because she saw a painting of it in the trees in a mural I painted in her room and asked about it. From that ...


7

In an adult I would say this sounds like the obsessive part of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). I don't think this is normal for a 5 year old, so you should seek professional help with it.


4

To summarize: You now live with your wife's teenage siblings. You no longer have adequate sleeping arrangements for yourself, your oldest son, or your wife. Your son's teenage uncle is being a bad role model for your son. You struggle with your job (work from home or at an office?). Your wife focuses her time on the youngest son, swinging his bouncy (I ...


3

Disclaimer: anecdotal evidence only. My nephew exhibited similar behaviour. He has a high IQ, but not Asperger; he grew up to be a healthy functioning adult, and we were eventually able to discuss his childhood. The seemingly random crying, and the "I don't know" answer, happened to him often at school. He was actually answering honestly; there was a great ...


3

I don't even watch R-rated films myself, because I don't like how they make me feel, and I won't let my son watch PG-13 films until he turns 13, which will be in a few months. Nevertheless, he gets seriously into the characters of movies he has never watched, and is not even aware of the basic plot. He is constantly asking for toys from those movies. I'm ...


2

I offer toys to kids based on their and my personal preferences (not backed by research studies). Just like any other toys, Alien-based toys can be suitable for healthy playing for some 8-14-year-old children and not suitable for others. The short answer is "it depends" on the child. Fictional material with high levels of gore and violence is ...


2

It's simple. We have a 4 and 7 year old boys whom both neglected to flush and wash their hands with soap and water after a number one or worse a number two. Big bug bear!!!! But I made a little rhyme for them to remember and IT WORKS 😊😊😊 "Wee, poo, flush the loo and wash your hands right after" The youngest then taught his elder brother and now they ...


2

Your son wants attention, your attention. It's the primal behavior of (younger) children. The only way you can take a break is by talking to the adults. If your wife plays with your son that's probably a time he won't follow. If he is left on his own he will go look for you. Some things you can do with your son (he can go color while you study). Same applies ...


2

Some personal opinions (based on experiences with my own children): Material is not so much "age-appropriate" as "child-appropriate". Each child has different things they handle well or not so well. The same child may enjoy a Tyrannosaurus going on a rampage, yet have nightmares over a kitten getting hurt. I feel that with material the child is exposed to ...


2

Yes, but...make a conscious decision about how you want to balance commitment and the ability to explore. First, every child is different. But in my personal experience I discussed and enforced a certain amount of follow through with each of my three children when they were five and started getting small chores. They seemed to understand and while it took ...


2

This could be a game I slept on this and woke up with a thought I don't think has been mentioned. This is a bright child and quite possibly has a vivid imagination. Such people can become excellent authors of fiction through being able to live in an imaginary world as well as the real one. β€œStories of imagination tend to upset those without one.” ― Terry ...


1

EDIT Some of my ideas have been challenged by @anongoodnurse and I welcome this. I want to be clear that my answer is my personal opinion, I am not an expert in psychiatry or psychology and am definitely making no attempt at diagnosis (no-one could on the basis of a Stack Exchange question alone) - I am merely throwing out ideas. I agree that professional ...


1

You are introverted Honestly this sounds more like you are an introvert than an issue with your child. I am introverted as well and I can tell you from experience that having children makes finding a balance an incredibly difficult struggle, but not impossible. Without "me" time, quiet time, and time to yourself to recharge your social meter you will ...


1

I strongly suggest you don't try to fight this. Your toddler will grow fast. This is just a phase. It will pass before you know it. Like most things in the early child age, it is probably better to endure and find the comedy in everything than to make an uncomfortable spectacle of your home life based on minor incidents you will almost positively forget in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible