49

Here's a great way that has nothing to do with money but instead something tangible that's easier for young minds to grasp. Plants! What you want to do is get your hands on some heritage-grade seeds - the sort that will grow plants that then make their own seeds that will produce more plants. Some sort of beans might be a good choice, but look into various ...


39

Well, I'm not keen on the idea that there is one set of activities which are suitable for girls and a different set of activities which are suitable for boys. I try to give my daughters the idea that they can be engineers, scientists, astronauts or dragon-tamers (ok, maybe lion-tamers) if they want to be when they grow up, and not limit their options to ...


28

I started looking into research relating to the value that toddlers might get from a museum visit, and I'm almost overwhelmed by the number of quotes and discussions I found (much of it from the museum's perspective). The Importance of Taking Children to Museums from the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works Blog (the post includes links to a great deal ...


27

There are many board games in the market which are designed exactly in this way. The overall idea of this kind of games is that you earn points (XPs) and money. Points are important at the end - they make the final score. Money is important only in the course of the game, you need it to get XPs but it is not the goal of the game. The games usually work in ...


25

I started running with my dad and he did usually do some warm up with me and then run around the block with me. When we were back again I got a glass of water and a sandwich, while he went out again running his real training. I think just spending time with her, and telling her that you enjoy running with her is a good start at her age.


22

First of all, my advice is that you should avoid television and computers for now. He's too young to really benefit from it, and these things can train him to become even more impatient and shorten his attention span. I think this related question has several useful answers for you: How can I keep a 14 month old busy at some activity for longer than 3 ...


22

I meet people at local meetups. Where I live there are about three Python meetups a month. My experiences have been great: excellent programmers who just like to talk shop. While you will likely meet others at your skill level, you won't meet people at your age level. It will mostly be older people (e.g. college age or higher), but if the goal is to talk ...


21

A 14 month old will have a short attention span - letting him watch the TV might seem like a pain free solution, but it generally is considered to actually make things worse. What you should do is plan for a lot of engaging activities - almost simultaneously. For example sitting with him on the floor surrounded by a range of different toys which do ...


21

Expressing an opinion of not wanting to be near/liking another parent is for the most part very natural for someone of that age, and certainly the opinions need to be explored with the child. Appropriate questioning like "Tell me why you don't want [parent] to join us," spoken in a gentle fashion will help show the child that it is ok for him to have ...


18

I have some good news and some bad news. Good news is, this behaviour is entirely normal. For the bad news, re-read the good news. At around 2.5+, your child works out that one way to get a little bit more attention is to make you a little less secure about their affection. Anecdotally, my 2-year-old daughter occasionally says "I don't like Daddy", or ...


16

Cook! Every kid should learn how. Start with pancakes (not a mix . . . make it from scratch!) If she's on the high side of four and you have an electric griddle, she could probably flip them with practice and you right there. Every time you repair something have her assist. My youngest daughter could replace a doorknob/lock set when she was seven because ...


16

First, good on you guys for recognizing this and addressing it both with your daughter and the group that held the event. It's not always easy to speak up in a group setting when this happens RIGHT THEN; although I'm a pretty much "in the brain, out the mouth" kind of person, I fully advocate taking the time to make the CORRECT response, not just any ...


16

This can be a common issue in children who are very successful in almost anything: when they are motivated by success, and that success is easy to achieve, they see no reason to work hard to achieve basically the same success. The returns for additional success tend to be diminishing; being a big fish in a small pond can be very comfortable to someone ...


16

Very, very carefully. Seriously, one of the easiest ways of offending friends is criticizing the way they raise their children, even if you mean well. I'm sure that you have only the best intentions for these children, but so do they. Or at least I hope so. Being a parent is challenging in more ways that I would ever had though possible before I had my ...


15

I'm 15, and I had this same problem about a year ago. There's an awesome community called HS Hackers on Facebook. To call it lifechanging would be a gross understatement. Hackathons are the best way to meet other talented (and often young) programmers. Hackathons are basically coding marathons. The best event to go to would be a CodeDay. It's a 24 hour ...


13

There's a common saying among highly-successful people, which is to never be the smartest person in the room. You grow by surrounding yourself with people who challenge you to be better. Somewhat counterintuitively, if you want to be truly successful, you need to fail sometimes. If you never fail, you're not pushing your boundaries. You're playing it too ...


13

At this point, you're not teaching your daughters how to run a tea party. That's their job to teach you. You're teaching them (by example) how to cooperate, negotiate, share, make decisions, respond and adapt to change, resolve disputes, and tidy up when they're done. Don't sweat it if they don't understand what you're trying to show them right now. The ...


12

Yes, visiting an art gallery or history museum is great for toddlers. We live in London and are blessed with a huge number of world class free museums and I would say that taking a toddler to a museum is an amazing experience for both parents and toddler. You will be surprised by how rewarding it is for all of you. We have been taking our daughter to ...


11

First of all, why are you making him take piano? Do you feel he'll gain something from it? Is he naturally good at it, so you want to foster that in him? Are you trying to make him learn it, because that's what you feel society expects? Are you doing it because it's something you enjoy and want to pass that on to him? Additionally, why are you being his ...


11

Maybe he needs to try something less "sportsy" and more "artsy". Maybe he would enjoy getting involved in theater or taking some art classes or joining a children's choir or piano lessons? If his sisters excel in athletics then finding something completely different might be the push he needs to distinguish himself. If athletics is a priority in his ...


11

Make beef jerky A tasty lesson about how important water is in living organisms. The fact that the human body is 70% water is pretty well known, but really on its own it's just a simple factoid. It doesn't teach you much. Instead, make the knowledge part of a lesson in biology revolving around the importance of water to (all!) life. Since practical ...


11

If they can count well then here is a a quick and easy challenge you can set them: Challenge them to place a grain of rice on the first square of a chess/checkers/draughts board. Then have them place two on the second square, 4 on the next, 8 on the next,... They will soon realise the impossibility of the task and will learn the compound interest/growth ...


10

Where and how are you going camping? Woods survival style (no power etc)? Campsite at a local lake? Campsite at a state park? Someone's back 40? For the sake of the answer, I'm going to assume that you're doing like most people and get a powered campsite near a local reservoir. So basically a mowed lawn bordered by non-mowed scrub vegetation bordered by ...


10

Our son started really getting into certain types of building toys around that age, wooden trains/tracks, duplos, and megablocks. Megablocks are easier to put together than duplos if you child is not dexterous enough for duplos yet. Spend as much time as you can doing physical (for him) things too, take walks together, or take a soft ball outside and show ...


10

It really depends entirely on the child. As for: what to do if they are bored after 5 minutes Leave. Be prepared to NOT make it through the entire film and be OK leaving early if need be. That takes a lot of stress out of the whole process.


10

I don't think your older son really has a choice in being okay with it or not. If the friend and the younger child want to be friends, hang out, and do stuff together, your son can either tag along and be cool with it or find another friend. Your older son is not in possession of this friend. He's not a toy that he can refuse to let his younger brother ...


10

I hear your frustration! I have a 5 year old daughter who is slower than molasses waiting on Christmas. The mornings have turned into a routine for us though. She used to get up and want to watch a show on TV before getting breakfast. We quickly learned that this led to her watching her show and not eating. So we put the rule in place that she couldn't watch ...


10

I think the first step is recognizing that your desires are in conflict with your children's. You are craving some special event time, and they have been craving unstructured time. It's natural and okay to have conflicting desires with your family, just be aware the conflict exists and make a conscious choice about whose needs are going to be paramount at ...


10

Diffuse these situations without adding to a perceived disparity. A simple comment to the tune of "oh, my daughter is at the right age, not my son" would probably have been the best bet. Treat these situations as simple oversights, don't teach your daughter that she will be prejudice against or that she will need to be catered to. You have encountered ...


10

As for the recommended amount of sleep, sources vary - most state between seven and nine hours for teens, with a rather new study suggesting that the lower amount may be linked to better academic performance. If you read them carefully, you will soon notice that individual needs can vary and current recommendations usually add the caveat that each child ...


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